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November 14, 2012
In response to your letter to the editor on dinosaurs not being around 67 million years ago ("Bloody evidence undercuts dogmatic view of dinosaurs," Nov. 8): Yes, Dr. Mary Schweitzer's article in Dec. 6, 2010 Scientific American does talk about her finding preserved soft tissue in a fossil ... but it also says that fossil was 67 million years old. Elizabeth Reindollar Laurel
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NEWS
By Marty Conway | June 2, 2014
The recent three-day 2014 NCAA Men's Lacrosse championship event at M&T Stadium drew the lowest attendance yet - 78,234 - since Baltimore introduced it to NFL stadiums in 2003. And the Baltimore Ravens, the main stadium tenant, did not submit a bid to host the event in 2015 through 2018 in part because of potential parking lot conflicts during simultaneous Orioles games. How does this happen with a sporting event and geographic region, that seem to be so right for one another? With the sport's national governing body, US Lacrosse, here, along with the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame,  there is little doubt about the depth of both participation and support for the sport locally, and within 100 miles from Baltimore.
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NEWS
April 10, 1991
We stopped by a lunch-time seminar the other day at the Center for Communications Programs for Hopkins' School of Hygiene and Public Health and were offered a chocolate dinosaur cookie, a new version of ever-popular animal crackers. The sweetness of the cookie didn't take away the gloom of the topic at hand -- the relentless pressure on the Earth's resources caused by burgeoning numbers of human beings. (We learned, for instance, that at current levels of food production, 64 of 117 developing countries will be unable to feed themselves by the end of the decade.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
My former colleagues in police work made large amounts of overtime due to Maryland's marijuana prohibition, and commentator Sidney Rocke was correct that defense attorneys also make tons of money dealing with marijuana possession cases. I am certain that defense attorneys in Colorado have a lot less to do now that people there have voted to deal with marijuana like beer. Yes, Del. Joseph F. Vallario Jr. is a dinosaur who needs to be retired ( "A dictator in the House," May 5)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 7, 1991
They were big, nearly brainless and have proved to be irresistibly fascinating to scientists and laymen alike. No, we're not talking about NFL players but dinosaurs, the towering topic of an engaging documentary series premiering this weekend on basic cable's Arts and Entertainment Network."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
Thanks to Steven Spielberg and Michael Crichton, whose "Jurassic Park" roared through movie theaters last year, everyone who digs dinosaurs knows all about velociraptors.Those wily, pack-hunting creatures could out-terrorize giant Tyrannosaurus rex. Yet they stood only a little taller than a human, right?Uh, well, maybe not.A reborn dinosaur animatronics show at the Maryland Science Center suggests Hollywood took some liberties in introducing viewers to the heretofore little-known species.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 30, 1995
Here's a new summer boredom buster: Send the children outside and tell them to start watching the sky for flying dinosaurs. When they roll their eyes, insist the flying dinosaurs will be along any minute. And they will -- just as soon as some birds fly over. Birds evolved from some small meat-eating dinosaurs.Just ask the folks at the American Museum of Natural History's wonderful new Dinosaur Halls. That tidbit of knowledge and many others are here for the taking at New York's newest family crowd-pleaser: The Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs and the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs were just unveiled after a $10 million-plus renovation.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | February 5, 1991
The sophistication of your knowledge about dinosaurs is generally restricted by how long ago your children went through their dinosaur period.Even the simplest of kids' picture books shoots down the image of lumbering bloodthirsty beasts that was fodder for the fascinated baby boomer 35 years ago. Hey, silly, they didn't drag their tails, otherwise we'd have found tail tracks with their footprints. Don't you know that, Dad?Even now, if it's been a few years since your child was finding out that the apatosaurus and the brontosaurus were one and the same, you might think that the brachiosaurus was the biggest dinosaur of all, not knowing about the few bones found of the ultrasaurus or seismosaurus.
NEWS
By JOHN R. ALDEN and JOHN R. ALDEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
Dinosaurs are rising from the dead. That, at least, is what a glance at the new novels section of any library or bookstore would seem to prove. But while dinosaurs deserve resurrection as much as the dodo or the great auk, the triumphant return of these hulking brutes to the literary stage is a mixed blessing. I'm ready to send all those fictional saurians back to the museums from whence they came.It has nothing to do with literary merit. Yes, "The Lost World" (Knopf. 393 pages. $25.95), Michael Crichton's sequel to "Jurassic Park," is clunky and dumb.
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 16, 2000
IF YOU'VE BEEN to a gas station lately, you have no doubt been shocked by the prices: $1.67, $1.78, even $1.92. And that's just for Hostess Twinkies. Gas prices are even worse. Americans are ticked off about this, and with good reason: Our rights are being violated! The First Amendment clearly states: "In addition to freedom of speech, Americans shall always have low gasoline prices, so they can drive around in `sport utility' vehicles the size of minor planets." And don't let any so-called "economists" try to tell you that foreigners pay more for gas than we do. Foreigners use metric gasoline, which is sold in foreign units called kilometers, plus they are paying for it with foreign currencies such as the franc, the lira and the doubloon.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2012
In response to your letter to the editor on dinosaurs not being around 67 million years ago ("Bloody evidence undercuts dogmatic view of dinosaurs," Nov. 8): Yes, Dr. Mary Schweitzer's article in Dec. 6, 2010 Scientific American does talk about her finding preserved soft tissue in a fossil ... but it also says that fossil was 67 million years old. Elizabeth Reindollar Laurel
EXPLORE
November 8, 2012
The article "Dinosaur hunters know where to look in Laurel" in the Oct. 25 issue of the Laurel Leader begins, "It's true: Dinosaurs once roamed in Laurel. Of course, that was about 110 million years ago. ... " I wonder if anyone was there to see what the reporter confidently asserts. Or do dinosaur fossils come with little tags attached saying: "Hi, I am 110 millions years old"? Actually, the idea that fossils are millions of years old originated about 200 years ago among people such as James Hutton and Charles Lyell, who didn't like the Biblical account of Noah's flood.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 17, 2012
On Monday, a dinosaur walked inside the Under Armour Performance Center and was introduced as the guest of honor at a 3:30 p.m. news conference. Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome spoke of the first time he had spotted it, which seems like eons ago with the futuristic pass attacks of this age blurring memories of when the Ravens outmuscled the NFL while winning Super Bowl XXXV back in 2001 A.D. Then the dinosaur talked, reminisced and marveled that...
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Description: Two 110-million-year-old footprints that a massive plant-eating dinosaur and, perhaps, its offspring left behind has been uncovered on the campus of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. That age dates it to the Cretaceous Period, the last of the Mesozoic Era. NASA Goddard facilities officials are not revealing the exact location of the footprint but said it isn't going anywhere — moving it would violate laws protecting archaeological and paleontological artifacts found on federal lands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
The Academy Award nominations will be announced Jan. 24. So we asked staff who most deserves a nod but will likely be ignored by the Academy. The dinosaur in"The Tree of Life. "It was a tough decision, but he did the right thing. Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun I know reactions were mixed to"Martha Marcy May Marlene,"but I think it was powerful - moreso than"Take Shelter. " Anne Tallent, editor, b When will the "Harold & Kumar" franchise get its due?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | December 12, 2011
The countdown to the season finale has begun on “Terra Nova,” and God help me, at this point, I am invested in this outcome. Gosh, where to begin. Well, Lucas is back, with his CrazySexyMath, insane blue eyes and -- unexpectedly -- some pretty prominent pectorals. The 11 th pilgrimage is days away, putting the entirety of Terra Nova on high alert, with good reason. Lucas has finally perfected his calculations, which would allow him to travel forward in time, as well as backward.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Reporter | April 30, 2008
If you liked the Jurassic Park movies but long for a more intimate look at dinosaurs stomping around in a bad mood, this could be your big chance. Starting tonight, Walking With Dinosaurs - The Live Experience kicks off the first of nine performances at 1st Mariner Arena, having played to mostly glowing reviews since opening in July. The $20 million show, based on the award-winning BBC television series, features 15 "live" dinosaurs, snarling fight scenes, lush scenery, erupting volcanos and a massive comet that slams into Earth and signals the end of the species.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
ABC's INVENTIVE new "Dinosaurs" has all the ingredients of a breakout hit -- a great premise, a gimmicky hook, good characters, solid ideas, fine writing, extraordinary production values. But it shows in its premiere episode that it still has to adjust the seasoning a little if it's going to become a staple of the American television diet."Dinosaurs" was hatched in the fertile mind of the late Jim Henson, and now his son, Brian, and successful sitcom producer Michael Jacobs ("My Two Dads," "Charles in Charge")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | September 26, 2011
Subtlety isn't a strength of the new FOX show “Terra Nova.” With all the mystery and none of the finesse of “Lost,” and all the dinosaurs and none of the excitement of “Jurassic Park,” the show has all the makings of a glorious, wonderful disaster. The premise is simple - and ominous - enough. In the year 2149, the planet Earth has become a nearly uninhabitable dystopia of rancid air and Orwellian undertones, so the government has begun sending people back in time - 85 million years back in time, to be precise, to start a new life in fortressed cabanas in the midst of a dinosaur-inhabited jungle.
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