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By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
When Southern Living magazine asked Baltimore botanical artist Meg Page to create dinnerware that can bridge the fall and winter entertaining seasons, she asked them to send her clippings from branches in their own backyards so she could get it right. Page then arranged the nandina, boxwood, holly and mistletoe on the edges of white china, as she would a natural garnish, and began to create. The result: dinnerware and serving pieces that have the same effect "as you would have if you ran out and clipped some holly for your cheese plate," said Page.
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By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
When Southern Living magazine asked Baltimore botanical artist Meg Page to create dinnerware that can bridge the fall and winter entertaining seasons, she asked them to send her clippings from branches in their own backyards so she could get it right. Page then arranged the nandina, boxwood, holly and mistletoe on the edges of white china, as she would a natural garnish, and began to create. The result: dinnerware and serving pieces that have the same effect "as you would have if you ran out and clipped some holly for your cheese plate," said Page.
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By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | December 19, 2004
Holly, like other evergreens, breathes life into a snowy landscape. With its glossy, rich green foliage and ruby berries that dot the shrub like ornaments, its brilliance in the winter garden can't be matched. The red and green palette and the familiar jagged leaf shape have been a popular holiday motif since ancient Roman times. The plant started out as a pagan symbol sacred to Saturn. At the Saturnalia festival, Romans gave one another holly wreaths. Centuries later, early Christians decorated their homes with holly to avoid being persecuted.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Tablescape. Is there a more perfect word to describe the collection of fruits, flowers and found objects that have taken the place of a conversation-stopping vase of posies in the middle of the holiday dining table? What your mother called her "centerpiece" has been replaced by an eye-catching profusion that runs the length of the table, charming guests with sparkle or whimsy. "I like to call it opulent simplicity," said Sascha Wolhandler of Sascha's 527 Cafe on Charles Street.
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By Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 5, 1993
Q: Is my Red Wing dinnerware decorated with tree branches and blue blossoms collectible? I believe it's about 25 years old.A: The Red Wing Stoneware Co., established in 1878 in Red Wing, Minn., initially made utilitarian flowerpots, crocks and jugs. In 1935 it began producing dinnerware and dropped "Stoneware" from its name. Red Wing products frequently turn up at flea markets and garage sales and are popular with collectors.Your circa-1953 "Driftwood" pattern dinnerware in Red Wing's "anniversary" shape "has a very stylized 50s look, and is not among Red Wing's most sought-after patterns," said dealer Ed Stump, of the Raccoon's Tale, 6 High St., Mullica Hill, N.J. 08062, (609)
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 19, 2008
Golf British Open 9 a.m., [chs. 2, 7]: Normally, I wouldn't suggest getting up early on a Saturday to watch golf, but the Open at Royal Birkdale in Southport, England, is getting a little interesting what with 53-year-old Greg Norman in second place trailing K.J. Choi by a stroke. Until now, Norman has spent most of the year picking out dinnerware patterns in anticipation of his recent nuptials to former tennis star Chris Evert and hasn't made a cut all season. At 7 p.m., on MASN, the Orioles are at home against the Detroit Tigers.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | November 11, 2001
The Thanksgiving table traditionally is the one marked by the most warmth and bounty, although other holidays may present more opulent settings. It's a nice practice, after all, to sit down with loved ones and give thanks for all the good things in our lives. To that end, setting a welcoming table is more than merely a cordial gesture. It's an occasion to decorate in celebration of all we hold dear. Some hosts reserve dinnerware to be used just for this hearty meal. Even so, introducing new accessories can freshen the table and make it more festive and colorful.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
Servings of history Lenox and Colonial Williamsburg have teamed up to introduce a new seasonal dinnerware set made with modern technology in a design that the Founding Fathers would have appreciated. The Boxwood and Pine Dinnerware collection features colorful seeds, fruit, berries and boughs on ivory china encircled with a gold band that is safe for both the dishwasher and the microwave. The collection is sold by the piece and includes a 12-inch dinner plate with a decorative spray of boxwood and pine accented with pine cones and red berries that sells for $29. The collection also includes cups and saucers, accent plates, mugs, bowls and serving pieces.
FEATURES
By Elaine Mar and Elaine Mar,koutsas Universal Press Syndicate | December 22, 1991
The holiday feast is as much a visual as a gustatory treat, a time for extra fussing to make the table festive. We are inspired not only by the pleasure of gathering family and friends around the table, but by feelings of stability and warmth.No matter what your favorite style for a holiday table, a little tradition is a necessary ingredient. It can be present in a ritual carried on from one generation to the next; in the china, silver, glasses, linens or tabletop decorations inherited from loved ones or chosen during travels to favorite places; or in dinnerware whose patterns boast some sort of history.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Contributing Writer Universal Press Syndicate | November 14, 1993
Looking for inspiration to get set for the holidays? Turn your table into a bountiful harvest of fruits and vegetables. As you search for new twists on old traditions, you'll find everything from rainbow-colored goblets that happen to be lead-free to dinnerware and table linens whose patterns are derived from nature. Ecological concerns are nurturing a healthy appetite for some symbol of the great outdoors. While you are mixing what you have with real leaves or evergreens -- or persimmons, for that matter -- also consider an object made by hand instead of machine.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | July 19, 2008
Golf British Open 9 a.m., [chs. 2, 7]: Normally, I wouldn't suggest getting up early on a Saturday to watch golf, but the Open at Royal Birkdale in Southport, England, is getting a little interesting what with 53-year-old Greg Norman in second place trailing K.J. Choi by a stroke. Until now, Norman has spent most of the year picking out dinnerware patterns in anticipation of his recent nuptials to former tennis star Chris Evert and hasn't made a cut all season. At 7 p.m., on MASN, the Orioles are at home against the Detroit Tigers.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | December 19, 2004
Holly, like other evergreens, breathes life into a snowy landscape. With its glossy, rich green foliage and ruby berries that dot the shrub like ornaments, its brilliance in the winter garden can't be matched. The red and green palette and the familiar jagged leaf shape have been a popular holiday motif since ancient Roman times. The plant started out as a pagan symbol sacred to Saturn. At the Saturnalia festival, Romans gave one another holly wreaths. Centuries later, early Christians decorated their homes with holly to avoid being persecuted.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
Servings of history Lenox and Colonial Williamsburg have teamed up to introduce a new seasonal dinnerware set made with modern technology in a design that the Founding Fathers would have appreciated. The Boxwood and Pine Dinnerware collection features colorful seeds, fruit, berries and boughs on ivory china encircled with a gold band that is safe for both the dishwasher and the microwave. The collection is sold by the piece and includes a 12-inch dinner plate with a decorative spray of boxwood and pine accented with pine cones and red berries that sells for $29. The collection also includes cups and saucers, accent plates, mugs, bowls and serving pieces.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | November 11, 2001
The Thanksgiving table traditionally is the one marked by the most warmth and bounty, although other holidays may present more opulent settings. It's a nice practice, after all, to sit down with loved ones and give thanks for all the good things in our lives. To that end, setting a welcoming table is more than merely a cordial gesture. It's an occasion to decorate in celebration of all we hold dear. Some hosts reserve dinnerware to be used just for this hearty meal. Even so, introducing new accessories can freshen the table and make it more festive and colorful.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | August 20, 2000
An African flavor in dinnerware James Roland canvassed department and specialty stores with growing frustration. Where was he to find fine dinnerware that reflected his African-American heritage? "There was nothing out there," he says. So Roland, who recently moved to Baltimore, set out to change that -- though it took some time. Things came together about two years ago, when he heard about Main Street Studios in Warrenton, Va., a subsidiary of Ohio's East Palestine China that specializes in small custom orders and also does designs for Tiffany, Neiman Marcus and Royal Doulton.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Brown and Rachel Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 1999
Say "church" and most people conjure images of "sanctuary," "somber" and "formal." For Jim Griffin, the word church means "home."For the past 13 years, he has lived in a converted Dickeyville church built in 1849.The stone building originally served as a Quaker meeting house (then called the Ashland Chapel) for local mill workers and later was used as a Methodist church. In 1960, it was converted to a house, and since then it has changed hands twice. Griffin bought the house in 1986 for $195,000 and has invested $20,000 in repairs and renovations.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | November 30, 1997
Festival of LightsJust in time for the holidays, here's a menorah that's charming in both senses of the word.Handmade by Rina Peleg, the off-white, functional ceramic sculpture has little "charms," including Judaic memorabilia, hanging from it. Priced at $315, it's one of 12 menorahs in the native Israeli artist's Ora Illumination Collection, new for 1997.The menorahs are available at Craft Caviar, 1433 Reisterstown Road, 410-653-7333.Don't blinkYour favorite glasses wearers will never lose their specs again if they can park them on one of these whimsical cat or dog glasses rests.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | August 20, 2000
An African flavor in dinnerware James Roland canvassed department and specialty stores with growing frustration. Where was he to find fine dinnerware that reflected his African-American heritage? "There was nothing out there," he says. So Roland, who recently moved to Baltimore, set out to change that -- though it took some time. Things came together about two years ago, when he heard about Main Street Studios in Warrenton, Va., a subsidiary of Ohio's East Palestine China that specializes in small custom orders and also does designs for Tiffany, Neiman Marcus and Royal Doulton.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | November 30, 1997
Festival of LightsJust in time for the holidays, here's a menorah that's charming in both senses of the word.Handmade by Rina Peleg, the off-white, functional ceramic sculpture has little "charms," including Judaic memorabilia, hanging from it. Priced at $315, it's one of 12 menorahs in the native Israeli artist's Ora Illumination Collection, new for 1997.The menorahs are available at Craft Caviar, 1433 Reisterstown Road, 410-653-7333.Don't blinkYour favorite glasses wearers will never lose their specs again if they can park them on one of these whimsical cat or dog glasses rests.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | November 30, 1997
To many of us, the holiday table brings poignant feelings of nostalgia, for it is around the table that memories were born when we were children: memories of home and of family and of cheer.For some, holiday dinnerware is a central element to the season. The dishes are brought out ritually each winter like favorite decorations. Some are classics, such as Lenox's Holiday, introduced in 1974; or Spode's Christmas Rose, which debuted in a plum pudding dish in 1890 and re-entered production several years ago in a full dinnerware line.
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