Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDinner Table
IN THE NEWS

Dinner Table

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2004
For our parents' and grandparents' generations, the daily dilemma for any household cook was the question: "What's for dinner?" These days, as calendars grow dense with activities and obligations, the question in many households is not so much what to have for dinner but whether there's time for dinner at all. If you can't seem to get your family together for meals, take heart. You've got good allies, both in terms of practical advice and in research that backs up the common-sense hunch that there is something inherently healthy about a family chattering around a dinner table -- something healthy enough to prompt a reassessment of the frantic schedules that rule many American households.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
I had one of those soul-satisfying, I-love-Baltimore nights a few Saturdays back at Cafe Gia Ristorante, a colorful, cheerful and satisfying Italian restaurant on the corner of High Street and Eastern Avenue. We showed up for early dinner reservations and were whisked right upstairs to the narrow second-floor balcony, which was pretty darn magical on this particular night. The view from there isn't spectacular, but it's captivating, a mix of old and new. Across the street, you can see diners on the balcony at Dalesio's, and further back, the high- and medium-rise luxury apartment buildings of the Harbor East development.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
CHESTERTOWN - The questions were flying fast and furious around the formally set tables in a dining room at Washington College last night. Is it OK to tuck in your tie? What if the person you're eating with has food in his teeth? What's the proper way to sneeze? And what if your knife gets taken away with your salad? The occasion was the college's second etiquette dinner, a chance for students to learn how to eat soup and break bread with the best of them. "I know the basics," said Nicole Kesecker, a junior from Columbia, before the dinner started.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
When you grew up in Baltimore, in the late 1970s/early 1980s there were certain things you had to accept or you would never be able to speak at the dinner table. They were truths passed down by my father, brothers and sisters, and though I may not have witnessed the things with my own eyes, I had to accept them as the Gospel of Balmer. No quarterback was better than Johnny Unitas. Don't even try to suggest Joe Montana or that machine-gunning Dan Marino. There simply was no room for argument at my dinner table.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1997
Matchmaking is what Ahuva Albrecht of Pikesville does for a living -- finding husbands for single Jewish women and wives for single Jewish men.For Passover, an eight-day Jewish celebration that begins at sundown today, she volunteers to use her talents to arrange different kinds of matches: Passover Seder companions. Albrecht finds those with nowhere to celebrate Passover and matches them with empty seats at a family's dinner table."I expect that when they first arrive at the house, it will be a lot like a first date," Albrecht said of the Passover matches she has arranged.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 10, 2000
Q: My son, who will be 4 in October, has decided to be a cat. For about two years he pretended off and on to be a dog. Everyone said it was a phase. Well, now he's a "kitty," as he says. He even sits at the dinner table on his haunches with his fists balled up like paws and wants to be fed like an animal. I have tried to play along, but I feel this dinner-table bit is going too far. We have two cats he teases relentlessly, even though he knows this is not acceptable. I am a stay-at-home mom, and he is my only child -- so it's not about attention.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | January 17, 1991
Los AngelesProducer Norman Lear said yesterday that his new sitcom, "Sunday Dinner," will have a Baltimore connection.The show, starring Robert Loggia, is about a father and three grown daughters, who live in Long Island. One of the daughters, Lear said, is a 32-year-old single parent who has returned to the Johns Hopkins University to earn a Ph.D. in microbiology.When reminded at a press conference here that Hopkins is in Baltimore, not New York, Lear said, "I know, but she commutes back every weekend."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | March 13, 1996
I HAVE been lighting a lot of candles. It used to be that candles were reserved for weekend meals or semi-special occasions, which were also marked by the removal of the stack of newspapers from the end of the kitchen table.But lately I have been lighting candles virtually every time the tribe gathers for an evening meal. Sometimes I take the newspaper stack off the table, sometimes not.There are probably a variety of reasons, some conscious, some not, for my increased fondness for candles on the dinner table.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - So, what are you doing for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Day? Not much? Not a surprise. While we have rituals to celebrate other holidays - put up a tree for Christmas, watch fireworks on Independence Day, lie about losing weight on New Year's - King Day is less a celebration than a commemoration. Meaning that while some of us mark it by attending parades and interfaith breakfasts, many allow it to pass unmarked. Some folks in Dallas are out to change that. They'd like you to honor King Day by going to dinner.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
When you grew up in Baltimore, in the late 1970s/early 1980s there were certain things you had to accept or you would never be able to speak at the dinner table. They were truths passed down by my father, brothers and sisters, and though I may not have witnessed the things with my own eyes, I had to accept them as the Gospel of Balmer. No quarterback was better than Johnny Unitas. Don't even try to suggest Joe Montana or that machine-gunning Dan Marino. There simply was no room for argument at my dinner table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The idea that beer has just as much right as wine to be on a fancy dinner table is not a novelty. And during the annual Baltimore Beer Week celebration, which begins Friday, it's a matter of principle. The beer dinner, a multicourse meal built around beer pairings, is not only a staple of Baltimore's annual craft-beer celebration, it's become a year-round event in restaurants with adventurous beer programs, where suggested beer pairings now show up on menus as often as wine recommendations.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
Annette Stanley may no longer set a place at the dinner table for her daughter, Toya Hill, something she did for about a year after the 8-year-old disappeared while going to buy candy at a store near their East Baltimore home. It has been, after all, almost 29 years since the quiet, bespectacled little girl vanished, a span of time in which Stanley has married, moved and seen Toya's three siblings grow up and give her 15 grandchildren. But with or without an actual place setting, her lost daughter remains a constant, if elusive, presence.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2009
Polly Ailor Tucker of Knoxville, Tenn., was looking for a recipe of her late mother's for what she called "Pittsburg Potatoes." While she watched and even helped make the dish over the years, it's been too long for her to remember the specifics. She says the dish was a mainstay at her mother's dinner parties and that "it is legend among all those who joined us at the dinner table." Carol Rohn of Cockeysville had the recipe Tucker was searching for, and she said that this was a favorite dish while she was growing up. I tested the dish using a good-quality sharp cheddar cheese, which gave it a nice, rich flavor.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 3, 2008
Let me begin by saying how lucky we are to live in an area where you can visit a replica of an 11th-century castle and feast on hunks of roasted chicken while knights on horseback joust and sword fight and a comely wench keeps coming up to your table and saying: "More to drink, sire?" Until the other night, however, I had not availed myself of this particular pleasure, owing to one major factor: Tickets are $50.95 each for adults. And I'm too cheap to fork over that kind of iron for anything less than Springsteen singing while I eat. Then Medieval Times Dinner and Tournament, the company that puts on these feasting-and-fighting extravaganzas in nine cities around the country, held a "Media Night" at its sprawling Arundel Mills site to preview its new show, billed as a "spell-binding evening of royal entertainment!"
NEWS
By Sandra Pinckney | October 7, 2007
When I was growing up, dinnertime was the most important time of the day. Table manners were strictly enforced. No hats, no T-shirts, no elbows on the table and absolutely no television. My father sat at one end of the table, my mother at the other. My two brothers, sister and I sat in between. In the early years, dinner conversations revolved around school and friends. As we got older, we talked about world events and politics. At the table, we were learning how to present our ideas, how to defend them and how to do so in a respectful manner.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | January 17, 2007
THE CHALLENGE: Susan Kornick, an exhausted mother of three, needed relief from the nightly routine of making five separate dinners for her family. We helped design one meal with something for everyone. Robin Spence, the nutritionist for our monthly Make Over My Meal series, wanted to start the new year with a challenge, and we had one for her. "PLEASE HELP! MOM DESPERATE!" the subject line of the e-mail read. "I am the food preparer for our family -- me, hubby and 3 kids ages 12, 9 and 6," wrote Susan Kornick of Cockeysville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TRICIA BISHOP | May 4, 2000
Dinner time in houses with finicky kids -- as some of you know -- is often met with scowls, tantrums and defiant cries of "yuck!" The Chef Ladies at Barnes & Noble in White Marsh try to expand kids' tastes beyond peanut butter and jelly during a celebration of Cinco de Mayo today. Drawing ideas from "The Kids' Multicultural Cookbook: Food and Fun Around the World," the pair teach children how to make tortilla chips and then entertain them with stories while the chips bake. The idea is for kids to realize the importance of careful reading, especially when executing recipes.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
SAINT-DIZIER, France - U.S. Postal delivered yesterday. It was a chain letter, but not the kind you toss. Nine linked riders crossed the finish line in tight formation, a half-minute ahead of the next-best team. And as chain letters tend to promise, riches were bestowed on everyone. Postal's dominant, 30-second team time trial victory in Stage 4 of the Tour de France was its first and also the first in Tour history for a U.S.-based team. It gave four-time defending champion Lance Armstrong second place overall, one second behind his teammate Victor Hugo Pena, of Colombia.
NEWS
By Pam Lobley | December 25, 2006
In an effort to make nightly dinners with our young sons bearable, my husband and I created a conversation starter: We each go around the table and say a good thing and a bad thing about our day. This helps the kids focus their thoughts and lets us in on any goings-on at school we might not know about. I don't know about your dinner table, but ours borders on a free-for-all. One boy hates all vegetables, and one hates most meats, and they both hate a sauce of any kind. They salt their food until it's white.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
When someone you love dies, the stories you tell about them - whether you're telling them to strangers on the street or to family members sitting around the dinner table - don't change. For the most part, it's the same details, same anecdotes, same punch lines, even years after they're gone. It's the tense, unfortunately, that changes. He has a great laugh gets replaced by He had a great laugh. And while that might seem like a minor thing, it's not.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.