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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 5, 1994
Q: I have inherited some dining-room furniture that is a high-quality reproduction of both Hepplewhite and Sheraton styles. Now I'm puzzled about how to treat the dining room itself. It's a fairly large space with a 9-foot ceiling and two narrow but not-so-tall windows.Any suggestions?A: I assume that you want the room to look elegant and relatively formal.That shouldn't be too difficult to achieve, though you will have to sort through a number of choices relating to your taste, budget and the availability of certain items.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
At the end of a long driveway in the Reisterstown development of Chestnut Woods, an all-brick and gabled home sits on 1.75 acres of picturesque landscaping in front of a tranquil wooded area. With its 6,630 square feet of interior living space, 2609 Chestnut Woods Court is a great home for a family or those who love to entertain. "The exterior is Colonial, but the interior showcases a contemporary layout," said Michael Schiff, listing agent with Keller Williams Realty Baltimore.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 8, 1994
Q: I'm looking for some comfortable dining-room furniture that doesn't need constant care even though it will be used by a young family. The pieces are to accompany Oriental rugs and a mixture of antique and contemporary furnishings. I also prefer that the dining room ensemble not go out of style as soon as the latest fad passes. One possibility, I'm told, is "art or architect's furniture." Where can it be seen?A: You should start with the understanding that "art furniture" and "architect's furniture" are not synonymous.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2014
Ananda, a new Indian restaurant from Binda and Kehar Singh, the brothers who own the  Ambassador Dining Room  in Tuscany-Canterbury, is now open in Howard County's Maple Lawn community.   Ananda, which serves a menu similar to the Ambassador, is in a quiet-opening, or soft-opening, phase -- the low-key method some restaurants use as they work out kinks and train the staff. The official opening will be in a few weeks, Binda Singh said. Ananda is open daily from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Ananda is at  7421 Maple Lawn Blvd.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 8, 2006
Now that our kitchen restoration is finished, my wife and I have moved on to the next phase of such a project, namely second-guessing ourselves. Figuring out what we did right and wrong. It is amazing how quickly you move from enjoying a comfortable and well-functioning space, to entertaining nagging doubts about how you restored it. In our case, a once-dark and narrow ground-floor kitchen was transformed into a large, airy, combination kitchen and sitting room. Daylight now streams through windows that we barely noticed before.
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By Barbara and Ken Beem, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
When it came time for Stephanie Blatchley and her husband, Tyler, to buy their first house, the young couple knew exactly what they wanted. Having grown up in western Howard County, she was most comfortable in a country setting. Both of them wanted to be near family and friends. And the idea of easy access to major thoroughfares was appealing. They also knew what they did not want: a formal dining room. "We lived in an apartment for two years, and although we enjoyed that lifestyle, we wanted to buy a house of our own," Blatchley explained.
FEATURES
By RITA ST. CLAIR | January 6, 1991
Q: For the last 20 years my dining room has included a glass-and-chrome table, matching leather chairs and a beige wall-to-wall carpet. I want to soften the look and make it more interesting, but I can't afford to replace everything at once. Where do I start?A: My initial reaction is to urge you to break up the matching dining set, but on reflection, I think you should start with a plan. First decide on the colors and design direction you prefer.Since you have to proceed on a piecemeal basis, the easiest way to create a soft and interesting look is by assembling a mixture of furnishing styles that will form a coherent whole.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 13, 1995
Q: I would like your opinion as to the most sensible way of giving my dining room a more dramatic look. It's currently filled with mahogany pieces, including a 7-foot-wide breakfront.A: The photo will give you an idea of how great a transformation can be wrought in an entire room by altering the appearance of its single most important element.In this instance, designer Celeste Cooper singled out a breakfront for unusual treatment. The piece was painted in a faux tortoise-shell pattern with white accents that look like ivory inlays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2000
We have been casting around for a new watering hole with decent food since two of our former favorites, McCabe's and Alonso's, began experiencing culinary hiccups. So it was a pleasure to find Shannon's in Ellicott City - a popular, easygoing saloon with good food. Shannon's, which has been around for close to 20 years, expanded and redecorated recently, and the newness shows. Tucked into one of the small, innocuous strip centers along Route 40, the restaurant has a fresh polish and subdued gleam.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR and RITA ST.CLAIR,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 13, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a floor plan of our house, which is located on the beach in California. The dining room has a floor-to-ceiling bay window that provides a great view of the ocean. As you can see, however, the dining room has a lot of wasted space. How do you suggest I furnish this room?A: A floor plan of the room and its location in the house certainly helps me make suggestions. But there are other equally important pieces of information that I don't have available. Most significantly, I need to know how this room can best serve the user -- you.No design can be truly successful unless it meets the needs of those who have to live with it. But perhaps I'll be safe in assuming that at least a portion of your leisure time is spent watching the sun set over the Pacific.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
I am fascinated with hotel restaurants. It might turn out that I like to think about them more than I like to dine at them. Consider that a hotel restaurant is designed to appeal to a typical diner, or at least what the hotel industry has determined the typical diner to be, and a hotel restaurant becomes a mirror of our dining tastes, preferences and attitudes. And when, as has happened frequently in Baltimore over the past three years, a hotel redesigns, remakes or otherwise reconceives its restaurant, the picture comes into sharp focus.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
In the Lutherville development of Mayfair, 1 Seaberry Court is a traditional Colonial-style home. The interior, however, is designed for a modern, minimalist lifestyle. "This home has a current, versatile [floor plan] that features an open design in the casual areas, but also includes the formal adult entertaining areas of the living room and dining room," said listing agent Diane Donohue of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. "People love the flow from the living room to the office and from the breakfast [room]
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Keith Kratz grew up in White Hall in northern Baltimore County with happy memories of visits to the general store just across the two-lane street from his home. "It was a mom-and-pop convenience store back then," he said. "There was even a gas pump out front. " Kratz, 49, hasn't strayed far from his roots. In fact, he purchased that general store in 2001 for $170,000. His intention was to turn the property, sitting on 2.2 acres, into a home for himself and commercial space for his landscaping business, Outdoor Expressions.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Terry Stafford grew up in Chatham, Va., before bringing her Southern lifestyle to Abingdon some 28 years ago. Of her dream house, she proudly remarks, "Everybody who comes into this house says it should be in Southern Living magazine. " That was her plan all along when the builder she worked for designed a three-gabled, Colonial-style home for her and husband, Jim Boyd, for which they paid just under $750,000. A licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Premier Realty and the host for 20 years of the WCBM talk radio show "All About Real Estate," Stafford, 64, insisted that her home fit the couple's lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Like the song says, sometimes you want to go where everybody knows your name. For many Glenelg locals, that place seems to be Ten Oaks Tavern, in the Ten Oaks Shopping Center - and it's easy to understand why. Despite somewhat uneven food and a few service lags, the atmosphere at Ten Oaks is cheery, with the vibe of a family-friendly house party. Scene & Decor On a recent Thursday night, just before seven, Ten Oaks Tavern was packed. Both the bar and dining room are on the small side, warm and outfitted with comfortably familiar Irish-themed artwork.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
When Steven and Mary Lynn Lakin purchased their two-story Colonial-style home in Gambrills 12 years ago, they didn't see it as a longtime residence. "I thought we were one house away from 'the one,' but as it turns out, we've lived here longer than we ever thought we would," said Steven Lakin, president of a construction trade association. Plans change all the time, and the Lakins are proof of that. "And so, we decided many years ago to make this house the home we always wanted - [and]
NEWS
By Leslie Brenner and Betty Hallock and Leslie Brenner and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2007
The chef reaches up, pulls down a ticket, shouts out an order, spins around and inspects a couple of plates going out, wiping the edges with a towel. A loud clatter of dishes, a line cook barks back and another order goes out. This is the Foundry on Melrose, Eric Greenspan's hot new restaurant in Los Angeles. It's hectic and tense and noisy, but we're not in the kitchen - we're in the dining room. Though the new spot already has become known as a place to be entertained - there's live music six days a week - the real show is chef Greenspan himself.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 28, 1999
There's a scene in A.R. Gurney's "The Dining Room" in which a college student photographs his Great Aunt Harriet in her dining room as she explains the use of such arcane items as finger bowls."
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
A funny thing happened to Joe and Morgan Horvath on their way to a community art show in Reservoir Hill a few years ago. They fell in love at first sight with this Baltimore neighborhood of rehabbed rowhomes - many in the Italianate architectural style of the late 19th century. Adding to that feeling were the inhabitants, who to this day, the couple feel, are some of the best things about the neighborhood. "We were welcomed by everyone, from the young folks who rent a house across the street to the neighborhood veterans who bought their homes 30 years ago," said Morgan Horvath, a 31-year old preschool behavioral specialist with Project ACT (All Children Together)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The Little Italy restaurant formerly known Germano's Trattoria is now Germano's Piattini. Germano's was doing just fine as a trattoria, the owners said, but they wanted to keep one step ahead of changing tastes. So they revamped just about everything. The main dining areas in the restaurant were renovated last fall, and the menu was given a nearly complete overhaul. But really, the restaurant's whole approach to dining has changed. Dining at Germano's Trattoria was always a commitment to a full dinner, your basic Little Italy package of appetizer, entree and bottle of wine.
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