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By STAFF GRAPHIC | November 10, 1993
The United Nations appeared to make no headway in its attempts to negotiate the release of two Croats seized in central Bosnia by Serbs from a U.N. armored vehicle Monday. The Muslim-led government halted an evacuation of Serbs from SARAJEVO in apparent retaliation for the kidnappings. Almost 300 of the 642 scheduled evacuees remain in the city.Bosnia's Muslim-led government said there was no point reviving peace talks unless mediators stopped presenting "ultimatums" to accept partition based on Bosnian Serb conquests.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 13, 2004
Steve Foran headed to Iraq in January for risky but lucrative work as a truck driver, running a fuel tanker on dangerous highways with a soldier riding shotgun and hopes of banking $60,000 or more for the year. But now he thinks he has found an Iraqi payday that could dwarf his Halliburton contract. Like thousands of other U.S. contractors and troops -- and stateside Americans drawn by Web pitches from newborn businesses with names like BetOnIraq.com -- Foran is taking a chance on the new Iraqi dinar.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - As the focus in Iraq shifts from waging war to paying wages, the Bush administration plans to run Iraq on dollars until it fosters a replacement for today's nearly worthless Saddam dinars. American military officials are paying Iraqi civil servants in dollars, and they expect to continue doing so for at least the next several months. But a team of experts from the Treasury Department is commuting to Baghdad from Kuwait City, trying to determine the fastest and smoothest way for Iraqis to have a new currency and a central bank to control it. Yesterday, a senior administration official said discussions were under way with Peter McPherson, who was a deputy treasury secretary under President Ronald Reagan, to serve in Iraq as a coordinator on financial issues during reconstruction.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Lebanese security officials in Beirut seized a plane Thursday that had arrived from Baghdad carrying 19.5 billion in new Iraqi dinars, or about $12 million, said Lebanese journalists who spoke to the country's prosecutor general. The officials then detained three Lebanese businessmen for questioning on possible smuggling charges, the journalists said. Separately, in the Shiite holy city of Kerbala, a representative of Grand Ayatollah Ali Husseini al-Sistani told worshipers at Friday prayers that protests would be held if the American-led administration of Iraq refused to hold direct elections as part of its effort to turn over governance of the country to Iraqis by July 1. One of the men detained in Lebanon, Muhammad Issam Abu Darwish, the scion of a prominent Shiite family from southern Lebanon, told investigators that the money had come from the American-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad and was intended to buy armored cars.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 1994
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- After four years of economic sanctions, Iraq has become impoverished, with its citizens struggling to survive in a world of roaring inflation, dwindling supplies of goods and salaries that never catch up with prices.Last summer, there were two antique stalls in the lobby of the smart Al Rashid Hotel in Baghdad where middle-class Iraqis, desperate for cash, deposited their Arab antiques in the hope that they might find a buyer.Today there are 10.Amra Mufta, who presides over a stall, explained: "Everyone needs money.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Lebanese security officials in Beirut seized a plane Thursday that had arrived from Baghdad carrying 19.5 billion in new Iraqi dinars, or about $12 million, said Lebanese journalists who spoke to the country's prosecutor general. The officials then detained three Lebanese businessmen for questioning on possible smuggling charges, the journalists said. Separately, in the Shiite holy city of Kerbala, a representative of Grand Ayatollah Ali Husseini al-Sistani told worshipers at Friday prayers that protests would be held if the American-led administration of Iraq refused to hold direct elections as part of its effort to turn over governance of the country to Iraqis by July 1. One of the men detained in Lebanon, Muhammad Issam Abu Darwish, the scion of a prominent Shiite family from southern Lebanon, told investigators that the money had come from the American-led Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad and was intended to buy armored cars.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- On the narrow, crowded streets of the Wihdat Palestinian refugee village, the word passed quickly: The wing of an American jet shot down over Iraq would go on the auction block just after sundown.Anyone wanting a piece of the action had best be at the recreation hall and bring plenty of dinars.So, by late yesterday afternoon, that's just where 3,000 men were; shoving, grunting, surging and sweating their way into the smoky hall for a look at the booty of war, fresh from the front.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | January 1, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Yugoslavia ushered in a new year with a million percent monthly (yes, monthly) inflation rate that has plunged this once-prosperous heart of the Balkans into deep poverty and chaos.The end of 1993 was also marked by the first signs of serious social unrest that diplomats here fear would lead to emergency rule.In releasing the staggering inflation figures, the government Statistics Bureau said the cost of living rose over 6 billion times during 1993. Retail prices in December were 1,790 times higher than those in the previous month.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 5, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- Here on the glass top counter of Feisal Afghani's curiosity shop, there are at least 100 Scud missiles, freshly painted and made only this morning. Mr. Afghani is gently blow-drying the final coat of varnish.Each Scud is three inches long, stamped and cut from a sheet of zinc. Within an hour they will become key chains and brooches, and by late afternoon not a single one will be left.At 2.50 dinars ($3.75) apiece, they are the hottest-selling items in Amman.Such are the oddities of life during wartime in the neutral zone of Jordan, an oasis of unsettled peace between Israel and Iraq.
NEWS
October 2, 2003
A RIOT ERUPTED outside a Baghdad police station yesterday among demonstrators who were angry because they had paid bribes to get hired as police officers, but still hadn't gotten the jobs they said they'd been promised. They wanted their money's worth. On this side of the Atlantic, the Senate Appropriations Committee had just finished wrapping up the $87 billion bill to provide security and begin rebuilding Iraq and Afghanistan. Included in the many provisions of that bill is $290 million to pay the salaries for Iraq's spanking-new American-created police force.
NEWS
October 2, 2003
A RIOT ERUPTED outside a Baghdad police station yesterday among demonstrators who were angry because they had paid bribes to get hired as police officers, but still hadn't gotten the jobs they said they'd been promised. They wanted their money's worth. On this side of the Atlantic, the Senate Appropriations Committee had just finished wrapping up the $87 billion bill to provide security and begin rebuilding Iraq and Afghanistan. Included in the many provisions of that bill is $290 million to pay the salaries for Iraq's spanking-new American-created police force.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 10, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Every day, with the blessing of U.S. officials, Iraqi government printing presses produce 4 million portraits of Saddam Hussein. Hussein is rendered in purple ink against a filigreed pink and blue background, in a pose reminiscent of George Washington. One difference is that he is depicted wearing a business suit and striped tie. The portraits, printed by the mint, are on Iraq's 250-dinar notes, probably the most widely circulated paper currency in Iraq. The reasons the United States has been forced to approve mass-produced portraits of this country's fugitive leader while offering a $25 million reward for his capture suggest how complicated the reconstruction of the country now seems.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Pushing through the pickpockets and gun merchants clogging Kifah Street, a few men huddle in tight circles and engage in frenzied bidding wars, trading piles of Iraqi dinars and American dollars. The money-changers hold shopping bags bursting with bills. The men thrust their hands in the air and shout their prices. In lawless Baghdad, this is the money bazaar, part of a trash-ridden street where everything from eggs to night-vision goggles can be bought or bartered for and where the daily exchange rate is set for the dinar.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - As the focus in Iraq shifts from waging war to paying wages, the Bush administration plans to run Iraq on dollars until it fosters a replacement for today's nearly worthless Saddam dinars. American military officials are paying Iraqi civil servants in dollars, and they expect to continue doing so for at least the next several months. But a team of experts from the Treasury Department is commuting to Baghdad from Kuwait City, trying to determine the fastest and smoothest way for Iraqis to have a new currency and a central bank to control it. Yesterday, a senior administration official said discussions were under way with Peter McPherson, who was a deputy treasury secretary under President Ronald Reagan, to serve in Iraq as a coordinator on financial issues during reconstruction.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 1994
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- After four years of economic sanctions, Iraq has become impoverished, with its citizens struggling to survive in a world of roaring inflation, dwindling supplies of goods and salaries that never catch up with prices.Last summer, there were two antique stalls in the lobby of the smart Al Rashid Hotel in Baghdad where middle-class Iraqis, desperate for cash, deposited their Arab antiques in the hope that they might find a buyer.Today there are 10.Amra Mufta, who presides over a stall, explained: "Everyone needs money.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | January 1, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Yugoslavia ushered in a new year with a million percent monthly (yes, monthly) inflation rate that has plunged this once-prosperous heart of the Balkans into deep poverty and chaos.The end of 1993 was also marked by the first signs of serious social unrest that diplomats here fear would lead to emergency rule.In releasing the staggering inflation figures, the government Statistics Bureau said the cost of living rose over 6 billion times during 1993. Retail prices in December were 1,790 times higher than those in the previous month.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Pushing through the pickpockets and gun merchants clogging Kifah Street, a few men huddle in tight circles and engage in frenzied bidding wars, trading piles of Iraqi dinars and American dollars. The money-changers hold shopping bags bursting with bills. The men thrust their hands in the air and shout their prices. In lawless Baghdad, this is the money bazaar, part of a trash-ridden street where everything from eggs to night-vision goggles can be bought or bartered for and where the daily exchange rate is set for the dinar.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 10, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Every day, with the blessing of U.S. officials, Iraqi government printing presses produce 4 million portraits of Saddam Hussein. Hussein is rendered in purple ink against a filigreed pink and blue background, in a pose reminiscent of George Washington. One difference is that he is depicted wearing a business suit and striped tie. The portraits, printed by the mint, are on Iraq's 250-dinar notes, probably the most widely circulated paper currency in Iraq. The reasons the United States has been forced to approve mass-produced portraits of this country's fugitive leader while offering a $25 million reward for his capture suggest how complicated the reconstruction of the country now seems.
NEWS
By STAFF GRAPHIC | November 10, 1993
The United Nations appeared to make no headway in its attempts to negotiate the release of two Croats seized in central Bosnia by Serbs from a U.N. armored vehicle Monday. The Muslim-led government halted an evacuation of Serbs from SARAJEVO in apparent retaliation for the kidnappings. Almost 300 of the 642 scheduled evacuees remain in the city.Bosnia's Muslim-led government said there was no point reviving peace talks unless mediators stopped presenting "ultimatums" to accept partition based on Bosnian Serb conquests.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 8, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- On the narrow, crowded streets of the Wihdat Palestinian refugee village, the word passed quickly: The wing of an American jet shot down over Iraq would go on the auction block just after sundown.Anyone wanting a piece of the action had best be at the recreation hall and bring plenty of dinars.So, by late yesterday afternoon, that's just where 3,000 men were; shoving, grunting, surging and sweating their way into the smoky hall for a look at the booty of war, fresh from the front.
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