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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 3, 2003
A chapter in local music history ended over the weekend when T. Herbert Dimmock III wrapped up a remarkable 25 years at the helm of the Handel Choir of Baltimore. He retains his association with the group as music director emeritus. That quarter-century saw significant growth for the 69-year-old choir, which expanded from 34 singers when Dimmock arrived to more than 200 today, with several ensembles (including one of children's voices). Education and outreach programs were hallmarks of the Dimmock years, which also saw more than 400 pieces added to the Handel Choir's repertoire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2005
`Frankie and Johnny' Everyman Theatre wraps up its 2004-2005 season with Terrence McNally's Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, opening tomorrow. Described by its director, Vincent M. Lancisi, as "probably the most intimate play we have ever done at Everyman," Frankie and Johnny is an account of a one-night stand "that looks like it might blossom into a more permanent, deep, lasting relationship." Everyman company member Deborah Hazlett plays Frankie, a waitress, and, in his Everyman debut, Zachary Knower (son of company member Rosemary Knower)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2003
For the past 2 1/2 decades, no one has kept his finger on Baltimore's musical pulse with greater acuity than choral conductor T. Herbert Dimmock. The 51-year-old Peabody-trained conductor has guided the city's Handel Choir, Johns Hopkins Choral Society and choir of the Cathedral of the Incarnation and currently directs the singers of First English Lutheran Church, Chizuk Amuno Synagogue and the Harford Choral Society. But something he sensed back in the 1980s began to puzzle him. "It seemed like just about everything being performed here chorally was aimed at a Christian audience and was being sung at maybe a dozen or so churches up and down Charles Street," Dimmock recalls.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 5, 2005
When all is said and heard, the music of Johann Sebastian Bach remains both the foundation and pinnacle of Western art. His B minor Mass alone proves that. Everything Bach learned and everything he could teach is found here - and not just principles of counterpoint and harmony. In his grandly scaled setting of the Latin liturgical text, Bach also demonstrated an enormous range of expression, musical and personal. As a testament to one man's faith, the Mass is monumental enough. The work also unhesitatingly embraces all of humanity and makes a profound, universal plea for peace in this life and the world to come.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 5, 2003
After 25 years as music director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, T. Herbert Dimmock III would be entitled to put his feet up and rest a spell. Instead, he's plunging into no less than four different choral projects. "The thing that drives me to do this kind of thing," he says, "is a passionate love of choral music, which is a great way to bring people together, to find a common humanity and create something that is beautiful." Dimmock will be putting that philosophy to work quadruply this coming season, starting with a new group, the Maryland Jewish Choral Society.
NEWS
July 8, 2004
On July 6, 2006, ROBERT A. BROXHAM, of Baltimore. He was the beloved husband of the late Alice (nee Dimmock); devoted father of Charles Broxham and his wife Ruth. Service will be held at Druid Ridge Cemetery in the mausoleum on Friday, July 9, 2004 at 12 noon. Services entrusted with Loring Byers Funeral Directors, INc., 8728 Liberty Road, Randallstown, MD 21133
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2004
A `gift' of Bach The annual Bach Concert Series at First English Lutheran Church -- its "gift to the community" -- is held on the first Sunday of each month, October to June. The programs feature choir, soloists and orchestra, as well as a pre-performance introduction by music director T. Herbert Dimmock. It's a great opportunity to explore some of the most inspired works in the choral repertoire -- all at an unbeatable price. This free series opens on Sunday with one of Bach's early cantatas, Wir danken dir (No. 29)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 3, 1999
The Handel ChoirThe Handel Choir of Baltimore got some well-deserved Christmas cheer at the lovely home of Madge and Haswell Franklin Sr. after putting on a holiday performance at Goucher College. Choir members, board members and guests attended this gala reception that celebrated the choir's 65th year of performing Handel's ``Messiah.''The party's guest of honor was Christine Meadows of Portland, Ore. Each year the Anne Dimmock Memorial Chair pays to bring a rising young star to town to perform in the ``Messiah.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
THE CATHEDRAL of San Marco in Venice, an enormous domed building with layers of balconies, is famous in musical history because Giovani Gabrieli (1557-1612) composed choral works that singers and other musicians in separate places would send reverberating around the hall in luscious High Renaissance sound bites.Gabrieli is known as the culmination of the antiphonal school of music, responsive singing by different units of a choir, said T. Herbert Dimmock, music director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, organist, baritone and sacred choral music fan.Singers, brass choirs and organs would speak to each other from different balconies and other spots.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 17, 1990
HANDEL'S "MESSIAH" is so melodic, familiar and beloved, some listeners can't abide even fine choruses having it all to themselves. So Saturday night at the Second Presbyterian Church on St. Paul Street, several listeners out of more than 650 in the audience softly sang or hummed parts as the Handel Choir and orchestra superbly performed the oratorio.It was just one more tribute to the music of Handel, who wrote the masterpiece in 24 days. But the private sing-along also honored director T. Herbert Dimmock, the 75-member chorus, four soloists and 20 instrumentalists who teamed up for the choir's impressive 56th consecutive annual "Messiah."
NEWS
July 8, 2004
On July 6, 2006, ROBERT A. BROXHAM, of Baltimore. He was the beloved husband of the late Alice (nee Dimmock); devoted father of Charles Broxham and his wife Ruth. Service will be held at Druid Ridge Cemetery in the mausoleum on Friday, July 9, 2004 at 12 noon. Services entrusted with Loring Byers Funeral Directors, INc., 8728 Liberty Road, Randallstown, MD 21133
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2003
For the past 2 1/2 decades, no one has kept his finger on Baltimore's musical pulse with greater acuity than choral conductor T. Herbert Dimmock. The 51-year-old Peabody-trained conductor has guided the city's Handel Choir, Johns Hopkins Choral Society and choir of the Cathedral of the Incarnation and currently directs the singers of First English Lutheran Church, Chizuk Amuno Synagogue and the Harford Choral Society. But something he sensed back in the 1980s began to puzzle him. "It seemed like just about everything being performed here chorally was aimed at a Christian audience and was being sung at maybe a dozen or so churches up and down Charles Street," Dimmock recalls.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 5, 2003
After 25 years as music director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, T. Herbert Dimmock III would be entitled to put his feet up and rest a spell. Instead, he's plunging into no less than four different choral projects. "The thing that drives me to do this kind of thing," he says, "is a passionate love of choral music, which is a great way to bring people together, to find a common humanity and create something that is beautiful." Dimmock will be putting that philosophy to work quadruply this coming season, starting with a new group, the Maryland Jewish Choral Society.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 3, 2003
A chapter in local music history ended over the weekend when T. Herbert Dimmock III wrapped up a remarkable 25 years at the helm of the Handel Choir of Baltimore. He retains his association with the group as music director emeritus. That quarter-century saw significant growth for the 69-year-old choir, which expanded from 34 singers when Dimmock arrived to more than 200 today, with several ensembles (including one of children's voices). Education and outreach programs were hallmarks of the Dimmock years, which also saw more than 400 pieces added to the Handel Choir's repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,Special to the Sun | November 29, 2001
For many families, the winter holidays wouldn't be complete without hearing Handel's Messiah or seeing The Nutcracker or A Christmas Carol. For families that don't have such a tradition, this holiday season may be a good time to start one. This year more than ever, families in the United States are looking for ways to reconnect and reaffirm their celebration of life. Continuing or initiating a tradition of seeing a classic holiday production may be just the thing to accomplish that as this year of turmoil comes to a close.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 20, 2001
George Bernard Shaw, who took a dim view of many things, once unleashed this unrivaled definition of oratorio: "Unstaged operettas on scriptural themes, written in a style in which solemnity and triviality are blended in the right proportion for boring an atheist out of his senses." This weekend, several Baltimore-area groups should have an easy time disproving that notion with performances of oratorios and a near-oratorio. Although the public never tires of "Messiah," there is much to savor in the rest of Handel's roughly two dozen oratorios.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,Special to the Sun | November 29, 2001
For many families, the winter holidays wouldn't be complete without hearing Handel's Messiah or seeing The Nutcracker or A Christmas Carol. For families that don't have such a tradition, this holiday season may be a good time to start one. This year more than ever, families in the United States are looking for ways to reconnect and reaffirm their celebration of life. Continuing or initiating a tradition of seeing a classic holiday production may be just the thing to accomplish that as this year of turmoil comes to a close.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 3, 1999
The Handel ChoirThe Handel Choir of Baltimore got some well-deserved Christmas cheer at the lovely home of Madge and Haswell Franklin Sr. after putting on a holiday performance at Goucher College. Choir members, board members and guests attended this gala reception that celebrated the choir's 65th year of performing Handel's ``Messiah.''The party's guest of honor was Christine Meadows of Portland, Ore. Each year the Anne Dimmock Memorial Chair pays to bring a rising young star to town to perform in the ``Messiah.
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