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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 23, 2001
One thing you gotta say about American Dime Museum boosters -- they know how to party. At the museum's second anniversary celebration, they ate fire and light bulbs, twisted themselves into knots, lay on a bed of nails and pounded 8-inch nails up their noses. OK, so maybe "they" were the featured entertainers, Todd Robbins and Ula, the Pain-Proof Rubber Girl. But the other 348 folks in attendance at the Dime Museum and at the Charles Theatre ate it up -- along with the party food of corn dogs, popcorn and cotton candy.
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NEWS
By Sloane Brown | April 8, 2007
If you couldn't head down to the islands for your spring break, you still could have caught a tropical breeze just by swinging by M&T Bank Stadium. That's where TurnAround Inc. - which helps victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse - was throwing its annual fundraiser, and this year's theme was "Steppin' Out to the Tropics." As they entered the North Club Lounge, guests were greeted by volunteers in Hawaiian shirts, sarongs and leis. The area was decked out in sunny tropical colors, with light sculptures of pink flamingos and tropical fish, and branches of orchids springing from coconut vases.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and By Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | November 17, 2002
A first for the American Dime Museum -- it made money at its recent benefit. In the past, co-founders Dick Horne and James Taylor have just requested a donation of "paper money" for admission to their wing-dings, which usually helps them break even, if that. In exchange, guests get a gander at the North Charles museum's collections of sideshow oddities while chowing down on popcorn, corn dogs and wine. Guests have also enjoyed performances by visiting sideshow artists. This year, some 400 folks enjoyed all those things plus shuttle rides and free admission to the "World Famous Insanitarium" sideshow, which the Maryland Institute College of Art helped bring to town, that was set up under a tent on Mount Royal Avenue.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2007
They came in cat ears, in polka-dot scarves, in leather jackets. Their glasses were chunky, their ears pierced, their eyes wide with wonder. As video cameras rolled, as checkbooks flipped open, as a few eyes misted with tears, they came one and all, stepped right up and took their chances, these 300 or so bidders who packed a Timonium auction hall last night for the liquidation sale that spelled the end of Baltimore's American Dime Museum. Richard Opfer, the auctioneer, said the phones started ringing at 2 p.m., three hours before the auction began, and never stopped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | December 9, 2004
Where: 1808 Maryland Ave. When: 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Why: Bored with the tired pickup lines you hear at bars and clubs? The strange, creepy and exotic memorabilia at the American Dime Museum should foster more inspiring conversation. (However, the museum's singles-night event takes place every second Thursday, so there is still the threat of hearing "Come here often?") Information: Call 410-230-0263 or visit www.dimemuseum.net. Event is BYOB, with some snacks provided. Admission: $5
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | November 24, 2005
Where can you find artwork made from human hair? A two-headed calf? An alligator girl? At Baltimore's American Dime Museum -- but only for a little more than another month. The eclectic museum, which opened on Maryland Avenue in 1999, will close at the end of the year, curator Dick Horne announced yesterday. Pointing to rising operating costs, maintenance problems and a lack of donations, Horne said the museum will close Dec. 31. Despite its popularity with the general public, Horne said, admission fees alone weren't enough to support the museum.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
Not so fast. Baltimore's American Dime Museum - that repository of the bizarre and the curious - may not disappear after all. Although one of the co-founders, James Taylor, announced that he is pulling out and taking his portion of the collection with him, his partner, Dick Horne, insisted yesterday that he would soldier on by himself. As reported in yesterday's Sun, the buildings that house the 4-year-old museum on Maryland Avenue are being auctioned off Nov. 20. Horne, who could not be reached for the earlier story, says he hopes to put in a bid, and if that is unsuccessful, to continue the museum's tenancy under a new owner.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome. - Isaac Asimov, science-fiction writer Richard Hoff can tell you everything you ever wanted to know about embalming. Whether it's the workings of embalming pumps (electric nowadays, not manual), the evolution of materials (arsenic salts through about 1855, formaldehyde thereafter), or the disposition of blood after embalming ("it can go straight down the sewer," Hoff says enthusiastically), the Pikesville jeweler can dissect his favorite topic with the erudition of a scholar and all the passion of a sports nut on a barstool.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
It is, in most ways, just another art exhibit. There is wine and cheese, and classical music, and people with art degrees peering intently at abstract paintings, talking about curvilinear shapes and undulating lines and the echoes of Pollock's style. There are also bananas. "Would you like a banana?" someone asks. But other than the bananas; and the photographs of a chimpanzee wearing a dress; and the fact that the chimpanzee wearing the dress painted the 15 works in this retrospective - which opened Friday night for a 10-week run at the American Dime Museum - this is, in every other way, just another art exhibit.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2007
They came in cat ears, in polka-dot scarves, in leather jackets. Their glasses were chunky, their ears pierced, their eyes wide with wonder. As video cameras rolled, as checkbooks flipped open, as a few eyes misted with tears, they came one and all, stepped right up and took their chances, these 300 or so bidders who packed a Timonium auction hall last night for the liquidation sale that spelled the end of Baltimore's American Dime Museum. Richard Opfer, the auctioneer, said the phones started ringing at 2 p.m., three hours before the auction began, and never stopped.
NEWS
February 22, 2007
WORLD Impact of British withdrawal Britain's decision to pull 1,600 troops out of Iraq by spring, promoted by U.S. and British leaders as a turning point in Iraqi sovereignty, was seen as an admission that the British military can no longer sustain wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. pg 1a Insurgents target Iraqi civilians For the second time in two days, suspected Sunni Arab insurgents in Iraq targeted civilians with a crude chemical weapon: a bomb attached to chlorine gas canisters that killed two people, sickened 25 and injured eight others.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 3, 2007
This time it's for real. After struggling to persuade Baltimore and beyond to believe in its homage to the grotesque, the freakish and the phony, the American Dime Museum's strange seven-year show has come to an end. In a few weeks, the entire collection will go to auction -- every shrunken head, every bizarre biological specimen, every mummy. "To the bare walls, as they say," says Dick Horne, the museum's owner, curator and biggest fan. "No offers refused." In the last few years, the museum's faithful have grown accustomed to hearing that the dusty Maryland Avenue space was closing -- only to find out that it wasn't.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 25, 2006
A column in the Maryland section on July 25 stated that the American Dime Museum in Baltimore had closed because of financial difficulties. The museum closed, but subsequently reopened by appointment or reservation. Not to be alarmist or anything - oh, what the heck, this is no time to mince words: Baltimore is losing its weirdness. It is escaping town and migrating to Washington, of all places. The first sign something was amiss came last month when D.C. Mayor Anthony Williams was photographed cannonballing into a swimming pool to promote the city's summer programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH YURGEALITIS | December 29, 2005
MUSEUM AMERICAN DIME MUSEUM CLOSING The American Dime Museum has long been lauded as one of Baltimore's most unique attractions. Unfortunately, it will close its doors permanently Saturday at 5 p.m. If you've never been or want to get in one last visit, now's your chance. ....................... The American Dime Museum, 1808 Maryland Ave., will close permanently on Saturday at 5 p.m. Hours are noon-3 p.m. today and tomorrow, and noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5; $3 for ages 7-12; free for ages 6 and younger.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
While many in Baltimore are itching to explore the soon-to-open $74.6 million "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes" addition to the National Aquarium on Pier 3 at the city's Inner Harbor, there are other attractions on a smaller scale that are worthy of attention. Two particularly inviting choices are Dick Horne's American Dime Museum at 1818 Maryland Ave., just north of the Jones Falls Expressway, and Rebecca Hoffberger's American Visionary Art Museum, perched on the south shore of the Inner Harbor with a spectacular view of the hubbub at the aquarium.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
Like an art connoisseur wondering what a Monet would look like above his mantel, Bob Wolfe spotted a museum piece that he said would look nice in his home. "I'd make room for the Amazon mummy woman in my garage, for sure," Wolfe said, admiring the 9-foot-2-inch remains - or purported remains - laid out in a glass case at the American Dime Museum. Like the mummy, the little-known museum at 1808 Maryland Ave. will soon be going belly-up. The publicized announcement last week of its likely demise at the end of December sent Wolfe, 55, out on his Harley-Davidson motorcycle yesterday to join the hundreds of visitors who have been streaming into the museum's cramped rowhouse quarters for a glimpse at its collection of oddities.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2005
Like an art connoisseur wondering what a Monet would look like above his mantel, Bob Wolfe spotted a museum piece that he said would look nice in his home. "I'd make room for the Amazon mummy woman in my garage, for sure," Wolfe said, admiring the 9-foot-2-inch remains - or purported remains - laid out in a glass case at the American Dime Museum. Like the mummy, the little-known museum at 1808 Maryland Ave. will soon be going belly-up. The publicized announcement last week of its likely demise at the end of December sent Wolfe, 55, out on his Harley-Davidson motorcycle yesterday to join the hundreds of visitors who have been streaming into the museum's cramped rowhouse quarters for a glimpse at its collection of oddities.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | November 24, 2005
Where can you find artwork made from human hair? A two-headed calf? An alligator girl? At Baltimore's American Dime Museum -- but only for a little more than another month. The eclectic museum, which opened on Maryland Avenue in 1999, will close at the end of the year, curator Dick Horne announced yesterday. Pointing to rising operating costs, maintenance problems and a lack of donations, Horne said the museum will close Dec. 31. Despite its popularity with the general public, Horne said, admission fees alone weren't enough to support the museum.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome. - Isaac Asimov, science-fiction writer Richard Hoff can tell you everything you ever wanted to know about embalming. Whether it's the workings of embalming pumps (electric nowadays, not manual), the evolution of materials (arsenic salts through about 1855, formaldehyde thereafter), or the disposition of blood after embalming ("it can go straight down the sewer," Hoff says enthusiastically), the Pikesville jeweler can dissect his favorite topic with the erudition of a scholar and all the passion of a sports nut on a barstool.
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