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NEWS
May 5, 2005
On May 3, 2005, EVE ANN E. DIMARCO (nee Rodgers); beloved wife of the late Joseph Dimarco; devoted mother of Joy L. Rhodes and the late Roy R. Rhodes, Glenn L. Fuller and his wife Becky and Joelle A. Martin and her husband Frank; loving grandmother of Tony, Jeffrey, Christopher (C.J.), Joshua, Alex, Rachel and Taylor; great-grandmother of Madison. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue, on Friday at 11 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
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By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Ravens are signing veteran linebacker Austin Spitler after a successful minicamp tryout, according to NFL sources. Spitler was a seventh-round draft pick of the Miami Dolphins in 2010. Spitler, 27, is a 6-foot-2, 250-pounder who has 31 career tackles in four NFL seasons. He is a former Ohio State starter and team captain. The Ravens are also signing undrafted rookie outside linebacker-defensive end Nick DiMarco. DiMarco is a 6-foot-2, 250-pounder from William Penn. The Ravens are expected to add other players, with veteran cornerbacks Aaron Ross and Dominique Franks regarded as likely additions.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | September 26, 2005
GAINESVILLE, VA. -- Presidents Cup As Chris DiMarco surveyed the 15-foot birdie putt he was about to take on the 18th green yesterday at Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, his caddie, Pat O'Bryan, said quietly, "It's the moment you've been waiting for your whole life, so go ahead and do it." DiMarco, who went from stalwart to star over the course of four days in this year's Presidents Cup, seized the moment, and the U.S. team, which had been waiting five years to win an international competition, took home a trophy that it had shared in South Africa in 2003.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Fresh from unveiling the new Hobo International accessories truck, Koren Ray is ready to take her fashion show on the road. In a couple of weeks, the owner of the Annapolis-based firm plans to cruise through the Mid-Atlantic to her most loyal retailers, using the truck as a mobile showroom. Inside, she displays handbags and leather accessories amid the same rustic, contemporary decor of her flagship store - right down to the live-edge wood shelving and lit plexiglass walls.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | April 11, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Usually, at the end of the Masters, there is a runner-up burdened with disappointment and regret. You can see it on his face and hear it in his voice. He can't stop thinking about the key shot he hit poorly or the errant judgment that cost him the lead. He knows he is going to have to live with having failed to come through, and it isn't going to be fun. Then there is Chris DiMarco, who exhibited no such sadness after bowing to Tiger Woods in a classic final-round duel at Augusta National yesterday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Most figured Chris DiMarco would fade quietly back into obscurity in yesterday's third round of the 65th Masters. They figured that leading after each of the first two rounds might have been a fluke for DiMarco, and the prospect of playing with Tiger Woods would bring him back to reality. Guess what? The skeptics were wrong. While DiMarco went from a one-shot lead to being two behind Woods after shooting an even-par 72, the 32-year-old journeyman stood up well under the pressure that comes with playing in his first Masters, as well as being paired with the world's best player.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
AUGUSTA, Ga. - A year ago, Chris DiMarco went to bed after the third round of the Masters sharing the lead with Phil Mickelson going into Sunday at Augusta National. About the most memorable thing DiMarco did in the final round was to give Mickelson a great read on what turned out to be his winning putt. "I learned, I watched how it was done," DiMarco, who shot 4-over-par 76 and faded to a tie for sixth, recalled last night. "If anybody had sat back and had the best seat in the house, it was me. [Mickelson]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2001
AUGUSTA, Ga. - The second-round leader of the 65th Masters is Chris DiMarco, who also happened to be the first-round leader. Not that many noticed. Given the history of the tournament and some of the names under his on the leader board yesterday at Augusta National, does anyone here except for DiMarco, his caddie and a small coterie of friends and family really believe the 32-year-old journeyman will be donning the coveted green jacket come Sunday night?...
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Sleeping on the lead going into the final round of a major golf championship is much like trying to get a few winks before your wedding day: You hope to rest enough so that you don't trip going down the aisle. Phil Mickelson, who has spent a star-crossed career catching golf's bouquets without winning a single major tournament, took half of this proverbial bed last night here in the 68th Masters at Augusta National while Chris DiMarco plopped onto the other side of this often lumpy mattress.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
AUGUSTA, Ga. - The list is filled with the not-so-rich and not-quite-famous, the long-forgotten and barely remembered. It is a list that dates back to the first Masters, when the tournament was still called the Augusta National Invitation and a fellow named Emmet French found himself in a three-way tie for the lead with an opening-round 70. French shot 83 the next day, withdrew and never came back. PGA Tour journeyman Chris DiMarco joined the list yesterday at the 65th Masters, becoming the third player here in as many years and the 16th in history to make his Masters debut with a share or sole possession of the first-round lead.
SPORTS
July 8, 2007
At Bethesda Third round, par 70 9-under Stuart Appleby 66-67-68-201 7-under K.J. Choi 66-67-70-203 6-under Steve Stricker 67-70-67-204 5-under Mike Weir 72-66-67-205 4-under Lucas Glover 71-69-66-206 3-under Shigeki Maruyama 72-70-65-207 Charley Hoffman 71-69-67-207 2-under Jim Furyk 66-74-68-208 Tiger Woods 73-66-69-208 Kevin Stadler 69-70-69-208 Justin Rose 69-69-70-208 1-under Boo Weekley 70-72-67-209 Mathew Goggin 73-69-67-209 Charles...
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
Augusta, Ga. -- As he walked off the 18th green last year after turning a late collapse into a sudden-death victory over Chris DiMarco, Tiger Woods looked sadly into the fading sunset hovering over Augusta National, his mind elsewhere. Woods had just won his fourth Masters, but he was thinking more about his father, Earl. The prostate cancer that had first been diagnosed in 1998 and recurred in 2004 had spread, and his weakened condition had prevented the elder Woods from leaving the nearby house the family was sharing that week.
NEWS
January 20, 2006
On Monday, January 9, 2006, HELEN ANNE Di MARCO of Picayune, MS, died at her residence. A native of Canansburg, PA, she worked with monogram/embroidery and a member of the St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church and she was a former member of St. Alphonsus Catholic Church, Baltimore, Maryland. Survivors include her brother-in-law: Robert Di Stefano, Picayune, MS; three nieces: Sandra and Lowell Webb of Picayune, MS; Donna and Erv Terwilliger of Ellicott City, Maryland; and Toni and John Del Guzzo of Pennsylvania.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2005
Gainesville, Va. -- The Presidents Cup, like the winning U.S. team, is finally getting its props. It took 11 years and more than a few tweaks to the format for an event that has often been referred to as the Ryder Cup Lite to register with a larger audience than just golf's cognoscenti. It took two scintillating competitions, the first two years ago in South Africa that ended in a tie and the one that concluded with Sunday's 18 1/2 -15 1/2 victory for the Americans at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, for the Presidents Cup to get recognition and respect for what it has become - an international event with more talent and less gamesmanship than the Ryder Cup. "I like that there's a genuine respect for both teams and it's more about the game of golf and not necessarily somebody being ugly and somebody not being ugly," said American Chris DiMarco.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | September 26, 2005
GAINESVILLE, VA. -- Presidents Cup As Chris DiMarco surveyed the 15-foot birdie putt he was about to take on the 18th green yesterday at Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, his caddie, Pat O'Bryan, said quietly, "It's the moment you've been waiting for your whole life, so go ahead and do it." DiMarco, who went from stalwart to star over the course of four days in this year's Presidents Cup, seized the moment, and the U.S. team, which had been waiting five years to win an international competition, took home a trophy that it had shared in South Africa in 2003.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 13, 2005
IT IS WRONG to say Tiger Woods was more likable than usual in winning the 2005 Masters. As one of the world's most popular athletes, he obviously was already immensely likable. But before the most recent of his nine major tournament victories, he was popular primarily because of what he did, not who he was. He was a ruthless competitor, a once-in-a-lifetime athlete, and people loved him more for his talent and accomplishments than his personality. In winning the 2005 Masters, however, Woods was more sympathetic, human and adult.
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne and Chris Dufresne,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 2004
HAVEN, Wis. -- He fired a 4-over-par 76 on the final day, played 21 holes and made one -- count it, one -- birdie and may draw up papers today to file for divorce from his putter. Ladies and gentlemen, welcome in and congratulate the winner of the 86th PGA Championship, Vijay Singh. "Wow," Singh said, "a bit surprised that I won the way I scored today." Ugliest win he has ever been involved in? "A good 76," Singh would joke. Yesterday's overtime final round at Whistling Straits proved what can happen to a golfer if he makes his tee time.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
POTOMAC - Playing in the Kemper Insurance Open is still a big deal for Woodholme assistant pro Wayne DeFrancesco. It's a chance for DeFrancesco to test his game against some of the world's best players, as he did yesterday with an opening round of 1-under-par 70 at the TPC at Avenel. But DeFrancesco is using this week's PGA Tour event, and next week's Buick Classic in Harrison, N.Y., to get ready for his biggest tournament of the year. That will take place in three weeks, when he defends his title in the PGA National Club Pro Championship at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ky. "I kind of describe the National Club Pro Championship as the biggest tournament I have a reasonable chance of winning," said DeFrancesco, who won last year's tournament at the Sun River Resort in Bend, Ore. "It's by far the greatest thing I've ever done."
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