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By MIKE ROYKO | March 17, 1993
It's hard to believe that John Dillinger was once the best-known criminal in America.And that his fame lives on. Movies have been made and books written about his crime career. His biography is in almost any encyclopedia.To this day, crime buffs stand in front of the Biograph Theatre on Lincoln Avenue in Chicago and say: "Wow, that's where the FBI gunned him down."How big a story was it, when he was killed? Under the giant headline of the July 23, 1934, Chicago Tribune -- "KILL DILLINGER HERE" -- were three Page 1 stories.
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NEWS
July 17, 2009
Bruno * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS ) $30.6 million $30.6 million 1 week Rated: R Running time: 81 minutes What it's about: Sacha Baron Cohen's gay fashionista Bruno leaves Austria for Los Angeles, hoping to become a towering international celebrity. Our take: Yesterday's emperor of movie comedy truly has no clothes. For a portrait of a monomaniac, it's alarmingly random; for an expose of charlatans, it's maddeningly shoddy. Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs ** ( 2 STARS) $27.6 million $119.
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FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | January 4, 1991
If it wasn't for made-for-television movies, we might all have a very distorted recollection of our own history.For example: You probably thought the 1930s gangster John Dillinger was a bad guy. You might even believe that he was an ordinary man who simply went bad. It might have crossed your mind that he wasn't all that sexy either.Wrong.Sunday night, ABC sets the record straight with "Dillinger," a two-hour movie (9 p.m., Channel 13) starring that brooding, menacing, wrong-side-of-the-tracks actor, Mark Harmon.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | July 17, 2009
Public Enemies *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 ) Every time a movie doesn't state its thesis, it's accused of "not being about something." But Michael Mann's account of the last 14 months in the life of Great Depression bank robber John Dillinger raises Maileresque questions about the tactics and connections of cops, Feds and crooks while treating "the golden age of bank robbery" in the folkloric manner of Jesse James films. And as Dillinger and his true love, Johnny Depp and Marion Cotillard really ignite the romantic melodrama - the ending is a killer in a good way. Opening next Friday 500 Days of Summer: (Fox Searchlight)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Great Depression bank robber John Dillinger (Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Without ever telling viewers what to think or how to feel, it raises more questions about the corruption of crime and crime fighting than any expose or thesis. And if it sometimes registers too coolly, by the end it rouses more bruised feelings than any four-hankie weepie.
FEATURES
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1996
CHICAGO -- Frankie swaggers onto the black bus with bullet holes in the windows and snarls at the passengers. "All right, shut up!" Then he pulls out his gun and starts firing.Everybody ducks, before the momentary shock gives way to guffaws. Frankie, a k a Michael Moylan -- surrogate gangster, tour guide, historian, comedian -- smiles mischievously. "Hmm," he mutters, "you must all be from New York."With that, we're off to Prohibition-era Chicago on a most unconventional tour, led by Moylan and his partner in crime re-creation, "Shoulders," street name for Randy Craig.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
Students in Jack Dillinger's art classes at the University of Maryland University College often ask him after final critiques if they can see some of his artwork. There isn't enough time, he tells them. Besides, he doesn't want to show his painting and drawing students just a few of the pieces he has done throughout more than 45 years as an artist and have them think that's the kind of creativity he's looking for. But now the longtime Columbia resident has invited his students and the public to see a collection of his life's artwork in a retrospective at Mill River Gallery in Ellicott City.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1934: FBI kills John Dillinger1934: Dionne quintuplets born1935: Will Rogers' plane lost1935: Social Security approved
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
COUDERAY, Wis. - There's not much here, even if you count the abandoned general store, shuttered antique shop and vacant bar lined up along the slight strip that passes for a downtown. Beyond the clapboard church and stone post office, this remote town consists mostly of thick forests, a blue lake and vacation homes. The area is good for hunting and fishing - and peace and quiet. As folks nicknamed The Terrible, Machine Gun and Greasy Thumb discovered. During the 1920s and 1930s, rural Wisconsin and Minnesota were a summer sanctuary for gangsters.
NEWS
April 22, 1997
Thomas J. Connor, 91, the last surviving member of the FBI detail that gunned down John Dillinger in Chicago in 1934, died April 14 in Southbury, Conn.As part of the Dillinger detail, he was stationed in an alley at the side entrance to a theater and didn't witness the fatal confrontation. Dillinger, "Public Enemy No. 1," had robbed more than three dozen Midwestern banks and killed more than a dozen people.Mr. Connor resigned from the FBI in 1935 and later worked with the CIA in New York.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | July 3, 2009
Public Enemies *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS ) Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Depression bank robber John Dillinger ( Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Depp goes all the way with the role of a wry, wily Midwesterner. He really nails this character - the scion of an age of speed who says he wants "everything" and wants it "right now."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Great Depression bank robber John Dillinger (Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Without ever telling viewers what to think or how to feel, it raises more questions about the corruption of crime and crime fighting than any expose or thesis. And if it sometimes registers too coolly, by the end it rouses more bruised feelings than any four-hankie weepie.
NEWS
June 5, 2008
Peacefully, on June 4, 2008, MILDRED " Millie" WIGGINTON; beloved mother of Frances Schneider, Peggy Fick, Charlotte and her husband John Dillinger, Bernie Wigginton and his wife Carol and Margie and her husband the late Edgar Denson; cherished grandmother of 17 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren and 4 great-great-grandchildren. Family members and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Friday from 3-5 and 7-9 P.M., where a funeral service will be held at 8 P.M. Interment private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove | August 29, 2004
Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 by Bryan Burrough, Penguin Press, 570 pages, $27.95. What an electrifying moment it must have been when Bryan Burrough made the discovery that was the genesis for this ceaselessly exciting book. During one two-year period, some of the most notorious -- and most colorfully named -- criminals in American history were all on the loose, creating havoc and diversion in a Depression-addled nation. Baby Face Nelson (a psychopath)
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
COUDERAY, Wis. - There's not much here, even if you count the abandoned general store, shuttered antique shop and vacant bar lined up along the slight strip that passes for a downtown. Beyond the clapboard church and stone post office, this remote town consists mostly of thick forests, a blue lake and vacation homes. The area is good for hunting and fishing - and peace and quiet. As folks nicknamed The Terrible, Machine Gun and Greasy Thumb discovered. During the 1920s and 1930s, rural Wisconsin and Minnesota were a summer sanctuary for gangsters.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 3, 2003
A pickup truck smashed into the rear of a tractor-trailer on the shoulder of Interstate 97 north of Annapolis yesterday morning, triggering a multivehicle pileup and a long traffic jam but causing only one minor injury. About 10 a.m., the northbound pickup truck struck the parked tractor-trailer, breaking the pickup into two pieces. The rear section of the pickup bounded into the traffic. Trying to avoid the accident, the driver of a flat-bed tow truck swerved to the left, sideswiping a second tractor-trailer.
NEWS
June 5, 2008
Peacefully, on June 4, 2008, MILDRED " Millie" WIGGINTON; beloved mother of Frances Schneider, Peggy Fick, Charlotte and her husband John Dillinger, Bernie Wigginton and his wife Carol and Margie and her husband the late Edgar Denson; cherished grandmother of 17 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren and 4 great-great-grandchildren. Family members and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, on Friday from 3-5 and 7-9 P.M., where a funeral service will be held at 8 P.M. Interment private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove | August 29, 2004
Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 by Bryan Burrough, Penguin Press, 570 pages, $27.95. What an electrifying moment it must have been when Bryan Burrough made the discovery that was the genesis for this ceaselessly exciting book. During one two-year period, some of the most notorious -- and most colorfully named -- criminals in American history were all on the loose, creating havoc and diversion in a Depression-addled nation. Baby Face Nelson (a psychopath)
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
Students in Jack Dillinger's art classes at the University of Maryland University College often ask him after final critiques if they can see some of his artwork. There isn't enough time, he tells them. Besides, he doesn't want to show his painting and drawing students just a few of the pieces he has done throughout more than 45 years as an artist and have them think that's the kind of creativity he's looking for. But now the longtime Columbia resident has invited his students and the public to see a collection of his life's artwork in a retrospective at Mill River Gallery in Ellicott City.
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