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By Peter Jay | August 1, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- One of the great successes of our moment in time is the comic strip Dilbert, which lampoons office life.Thomas Hobbes said it is the natural condition of human life to be solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short. To cartoonist Scott Adams, creator of the white-collar prole Dilbert, those who toil (or cleverly evade toiling) in the mid-level warrens of big companies are likely to be cynical, dour, lazy, churlish and curt. And their bosses are worse.As one who has spent probably too much of his life working in offices, not always unhappily, but who doesn't any more, I read Dilbert with a mixture of amazement and nostalgia.
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NEWS
August 10, 2011
Lately, I have become increasingly put off by Stephan Pastis' comic strip, Pearls Before Swine. I enjoy reading the strip but it seems lately there has been a lot more swearing by his characters. The problem I have is that my three children read every comic every day and short of cutting the strip out of the paper, there isn't any way that I could prevent them from reading it. I have had conversations with each of them about swearing and using inappropriate language and I think they understand.
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By David Zurawik | December 10, 1998
A reeling UPN, which is down a staggering 40 percent in audience share from last year at this time, announced a midseason overhaul of its prime-time schedule yesterday.The network is pinning its hopes mainly on the launch of the animated series "Dilbert," based on the popular satire of corporate life. "Dilbert" will premiere on Jan. 25 and air Mondays from 8 p.m. to 8: 30 p.m., followed by "DiResta," one of the only new UPN series to show any signs of life.Scott Adams, who created the "Dilbert" comic strip, serves as co-executive producer for the series.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
He's been an extra in his own comic before -- but he's never appeared as himself until this week. Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, the popular comic strip that lampoons business office life, headlined his strip Monday under the title "Note from the Author." Adams, a rather pointy-headed comic character himself, proceeded to buckle under fan pressure and tell the following "unfunny" office joke: "If you can't connect to the network, send a trouble report by e-mail." The author's head then pokes out of the corner of the strip and says, "Happy?"
FEATURES
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 1996
DUBLIN, Calif. -- We are approaching Nerdvana, as Dogbert would say. Scott Adams climbs the stairs into his study, the hub of a thriving revenge-of-the-nerds empire.It is here, in an office just slightly bigger than a cubicle, that Mr. Adams transforms tales of idiotic bosses and meaningless empowerment teams into humor, and thus into the life of Dilbert, the chinless comic-strip hero to millions of cubicle-confined workers.Powerless, socially awkward, doomed to work for inept superiors, Dilbert the overweight engineer slogs through corporate life in the '90s.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | February 12, 1998
"Dilbert" will bring its corporate angst to television next season in a series on UPN.The network announced yesterday that the comic strip's creator, Scott Adams, and producer Larry Charles, whose credits include "Seinfeld" and "Mad About You," will be the executive producers of the animated series from Columbia TriStar Television." 'Dilbert' is a perfect fit for prime-time animation," Adams said in a network statement."The readers have been begging me to bring it to TV. It's exciting to find the talent and resources to make it happen."
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 25, 1999
PASADENA, Calif. -- The biggest problem with "Dilbert," the new UPN series based on the comic-strip satire of corporate life, is expectations.The United Paramount Network lost almost one-half its audience in the last year after a disastrous fall lineup of flops, like "The Secret Diary of Desmond Pfeiffer," and "Dilbert" has been positioned as the show to stop the bleeding at UPN.That is too much to ask of any new series. And, judged in that super-hit context, some are going to call "Dilbert" a disappointment.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
He's been an extra in his own comic before -- but he's never appeared as himself until this week. Scott Adams, creator of Dilbert, the popular comic strip that lampoons business office life, headlined his strip Monday under the title "Note from the Author." Adams, a rather pointy-headed comic character himself, proceeded to buckle under fan pressure and tell the following "unfunny" office joke: "If you can't connect to the network, send a trouble report by e-mail." The author's head then pokes out of the corner of the strip and says, "Happy?"
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 1997
Whenever I watch a management guru on TV talking about how corporate executives need to "think outside the box" and workers need to prepare for the adventure of changing jobs seven times in their lifetimes, I think of Panfilo Julius Ciampa.Ciampa was organizing director of a national union for which I worked. He'd gotten his start working in steel mills and aerospace plants, became a leader in the United Auto Workers, founded a local health clinic, and eventually organized state and local government workers.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | October 9, 1996
First there was Dilbert. Well, first there was Scott Adams, who decided he wanted to be a syndicated cartoonist, although he really couldn't draw that well. "Dilbert," his cubicle-eye view of the modern office, became wildly successful after he began printing his e-mail address, urging readers to send ideas.Best-selling "Dilbert" cartoon books followed, and then "The Dilbert Principle," which went to No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Now, like most successful managers, Adams has learned to delegate, turning over the writing chores to Dogbert, the canine consultant who has just produced "Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook" (HarperBusiness, $16)
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 10, 2003
As if it leapt from the mind of Dilbert himself, Despair Inc., offers "demotivational" products for gift-giving in the workplace. "No matter who you are, you have the potential to be so very much less," the catalog touts. "Are you ready to unleash the power of mediocrity?" Among the season's offerings from this antidote to the ubiquitous Successories line are a variety of not-the-least-bit inspirational posters, such as "Get to work: You're not being paid to believe in the power of your dreams" and "Consulting: If you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem."
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
Scott Adams used to struggle for material for "Dilbert," his renowned, syndicated comic strip that chronicles a pointy-haired boss and his tormented staff, such as Tina the Tech Writer and Asok the Intern. But in recent years, real-life tales of worker disgust and job frustration have poured into Adams' electronic mailbox and provide fresh fodder for the strip as jaw-dropping as any fictional cartoon. There was the e-mail he received about a worker who was asked to contribute to his own farewell party.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 25, 1999
PASADENA, Calif. -- The biggest problem with "Dilbert," the new UPN series based on the comic-strip satire of corporate life, is expectations.The United Paramount Network lost almost one-half its audience in the last year after a disastrous fall lineup of flops, like "The Secret Diary of Desmond Pfeiffer," and "Dilbert" has been positioned as the show to stop the bleeding at UPN.That is too much to ask of any new series. And, judged in that super-hit context, some are going to call "Dilbert" a disappointment.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 11, 1999
PASADENA -- All questions and answers at the troubled United Paramount Network these days seem to begin or end with "Dilbert," the new animated series about life in a corporate cubicle from cartoonist Scott Adams that will debut Jan. 25.The biggest question: Can "Dilbert" save UPN?Dean Valentine, the CEO and president of UPN, started his network's midseason presentation to television critics here by putting on a black stove-pipe hat and saying, "Fourscore and 15 days ago, UPN brought forth upon this nation a new sitcom, conceived in silliness and dedicated to the proposition that a television show about the Lincoln White House was created funny."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | December 10, 1998
A reeling UPN, which is down a staggering 40 percent in audience share from last year at this time, announced a midseason overhaul of its prime-time schedule yesterday.The network is pinning its hopes mainly on the launch of the animated series "Dilbert," based on the popular satire of corporate life. "Dilbert" will premiere on Jan. 25 and air Mondays from 8 p.m. to 8: 30 p.m., followed by "DiResta," one of the only new UPN series to show any signs of life.Scott Adams, who created the "Dilbert" comic strip, serves as co-executive producer for the series.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1998
Despite a growing reputation among the theater-literate in Washington, Rep Stage remains largely unknown among Baltimore theatergoers -- and that's a good thing, at least for Howard County residents. It leaves more tickets available for locals to see "Neville's Island," Rep Stage's latest production."Neville's Island," by British playwright Tim Firth, is a self-mocking comedy with a soul of darkness.Tickets are, deservedly, selling out fast, thanks to word-of-mouth about the fine performances, fabulous set and overall excellence of the production.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 10, 2003
As if it leapt from the mind of Dilbert himself, Despair Inc., offers "demotivational" products for gift-giving in the workplace. "No matter who you are, you have the potential to be so very much less," the catalog touts. "Are you ready to unleash the power of mediocrity?" Among the season's offerings from this antidote to the ubiquitous Successories line are a variety of not-the-least-bit inspirational posters, such as "Get to work: You're not being paid to believe in the power of your dreams" and "Consulting: If you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem."
NEWS
August 10, 2011
Lately, I have become increasingly put off by Stephan Pastis' comic strip, Pearls Before Swine. I enjoy reading the strip but it seems lately there has been a lot more swearing by his characters. The problem I have is that my three children read every comic every day and short of cutting the strip out of the paper, there isn't any way that I could prevent them from reading it. I have had conversations with each of them about swearing and using inappropriate language and I think they understand.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 15, 1998
The new ABC midseason sitcom, "Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place," opened last week with one of the main characters, a woman in her 20s, complaining to two male friends about how much she hates her job."I have to put on heels, which I hate, and go out in the real world and sell chemicals, which I hate, while you two knuckleheads get to play golf, which I also hate.""Yeah, but you make like a bazillion dollars," one of the guys says."Selling my soul! Look, if I close this deal today, I make commission on 500 gallons of toxic cleaner I'm selling to some oil rig. So, I can enjoy a weekend at the cape while killing off all sea life between here and Guam.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | February 12, 1998
"Dilbert" will bring its corporate angst to television next season in a series on UPN.The network announced yesterday that the comic strip's creator, Scott Adams, and producer Larry Charles, whose credits include "Seinfeld" and "Mad About You," will be the executive producers of the animated series from Columbia TriStar Television." 'Dilbert' is a perfect fit for prime-time animation," Adams said in a network statement."The readers have been begging me to bring it to TV. It's exciting to find the talent and resources to make it happen."
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