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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
Home video production still isn't as easy as it should be - or as easy as PC makers promised it would be a few years ago. To be sure, computers are faster than they were and better-designed to manipulate digital video. For their part, video software publishers have continued to try to make the process simple enough and fast enough for people to use confidently. But all too often, prospective videographers are still struggling to get raw footage out of the camera and then edit it into something watchable.
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BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | October 12, 2006
Spend an hour browsing the videos posted on YouTube.com. Then ask why anybody would pay $1.6 billion for this collection of stupid pet tricks, fraternity pranks, garage bands, car crashes, natural disasters, amateur acrobats, soccer game snippets and hokey comedians demonstrating why their careers are on the express train to Palookaville. That astronomical sum, by the way, is what the folks who run the Google search engine agreed to pay for the Web's favorite video site. When I heard the news this week, my first thought was of H.L. Mencken's famous observation that nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
When I tried to convert my old home videotapes to a format I could edit on my PC a few months ago, I ran into one hassle after another. The video capture technology failed so often that, for days, I spent more time talking with technical support than with my wife. But video needn't be so hard to get into a computer. If you're willing to start from scratch with digital video from a new Mini-DV camera, the word "ordeal" slips out of your vocabulary. With relative ease, you can import DV into your computer, remove the chaff surrounding the few precious moments of tape that are worth saving, toss a few titles over the images and then dump them to videocassette, CD-ROM or the Internet.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN and JON VAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 25, 2005
For Comcast Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Brian L. Roberts, the key challenge in today's digital video world is how to become the Google of television. Roberts, who heads the nation's largest cable television provider, said broadband Internet makes the traditional cable TV business obsolete. As a result, he said, Comcast is stressing its on-demand video service, which enables customers to view movies and programs whenever they want. Consumers are beginning to get more choices in how they view video content, whether it is online, on mobile phones or new delivery schemes coming soon from the phone companies.
BUSINESS
By JON VAN and JON VAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 25, 2005
For Comcast Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Brian L. Roberts, the key challenge in today's digital video world is how to become the Google of television. Roberts, who heads the nation's largest cable television provider, said broadband Internet makes the traditional cable TV business obsolete. As a result, he said, Comcast is stressing its on-demand video service, which enables customers to view movies and programs whenever they want. Consumers are beginning to get more choices in how they view video content, whether it is online, on mobile phones or new delivery schemes coming soon from the phone companies.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 26, 2000
"Time Code" is the kind of experimental digital video movie that until now has been the stock in trade of college classrooms and arty festivals, so if only for bringing an otherwise marginal aesthetic to the marketplace it should be congratulated. Director Mike Figgis, whose bent has always been for testing rather than resting on laurels, even after the Oscar-winning "Leaving Las Vegas," here tests the boundaries not only of digital video technology but also of narrative itself. Using four hand-held video cameras to film four real-time story lines in one continuous, 93-minute take, Figgis has created a "quadraphonic" movie, which unfolds in a four-way split screen.
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and Jon Healey and P.J. Huffstutter and Jon Healey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2002
NICASIO, Calif. - Oliver Stone stared in disbelief. Here he was, sitting in a velvet seat in George Lucas' private screening room, listening to the Star Wars director foretell the death of film. To Stone, director of such films as Platoon and JFK, Lucas' vision of digital moviemaking sounded like blasphemy. Around him, other A-list directors, including Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola and Robert Zemeckis - fidgeted as Lucas challenged a century of tradition, warning his colleagues to embrace the future or be left behind.
NEWS
November 27, 2002
The crime report is a sampling of crimes in Howard County compiled from police. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 410-313-3700. East Columbia Cradlerock Way: 7100 block, Owen Brown. A man armed with a handgun robbed the Owen Brown Tennis Club of an undisclosed amount of money Nov. 18. Stone Cloud Lane: 8900 block, Long Reach: Someone took digital video discs, money and food from a home Nov. 19 or 20. Montgomery Run Road: 8300 block, Long Reach. Someone stole about $50 from a house between Nov. 15 and 20. West Columbia Centennial Lane and Route 108: Wilde Lake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,Hartford Courant | March 28, 2004
In the attic, in the garage, in the shed or in the basement, you just can't have too much storage. The same goes for personal computing. It's long past the days when we marveled about how quickly we filled up those once seemingly bottomless 1-, 2- and 5-gigabyte hard drives. The reality is that having available hard-drive space is only a temporary condition. No matter how big a new drive is, you'll find a way to fill it -- and probably quite soon. What's gobbling up the gigabytes is data.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | December 3, 1992
Ushering in a new era in home television viewing, the nation's largest cable television operator said yesterday that it would soon employ a revolutionary technology capable of providing more than 500 TV channels to cable subscribers.The announcement by Tele-Communications Inc., which serves more then 9 million homes nationwide, is the first major step in what is expected to be a worldwide shift to so-called "digital video" technology.By converting a video image into the ones and zeros of computer code, digital video makes possible a huge increase in the number of channels.
BUSINESS
By Meg James and Meg James,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - In the eyes of the television industry, Charlie Flint is the enemy. His Beverly Hills apartment has not one but two TiVo digital video recorders. Flint records television shows - even when he and his wife are at home - so that when they watch them later, they can skip commercials. He persuaded his parents to buy their own digital video recorder, or DVR, so his sports-fan father could instantly review any play he wanted. "Once you've used one, you can't imagine life without TiVo," said Flint, 36, a project manager for a company that builds Web sites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 9, 2004
IF YOU started shooting videos of the family before the advent of digital camcorders, chances are good that you have a lot of analog tapes on the shelf - VHS, 8-millimeter, maybe even some old Betamaxes. With DVD players rapidly replacing VCRs, you may also have thought about transferring those old movies of birthday parties and soccer games to DVD. And why not? Magnetic tape doesn't last forever, doesn't take kindly to changes in temperature and humidity over time and every time you play one the sound and image quality degrade.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2004
It seems like a no-brainer: Since digital camcorders and digital still cameras use the same kind of electronic sensor to record images, why not build a single device that does both really well? Like many ideas that seem simple on the surface, the devil is in the details. It's almost impossible, for now at least, to design a sensor that delivers outstanding performance both ways. The result, which I've seen over and over in recent years, are digital camcorders that take bad still pictures and digital still cameras that shoot bad video.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 12, 2004
Four summers ago, Michael Broumberg sat, glued to his television set, trying to witness every highlight of the 2000 Olympics. This year, the mass marketing of a revolutionary technology has changed how he and millions of Americans are watching TV. With just a few clicks of a button, the retired environmental specialist plans to program a digital video recorder - best known by the brand name TiVo - to capture Olympic events from swimming to shot put....
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2004
Cable companies, which have been weighed down for years by heavy investments and sagging subscriber growth, are starting to turn the corner. Comcast Corp. said yesterday that it earned $262 million in the second quarter, after losing $22 million in the quarter last year, thanks to an increase in the number of customers signing up for high-speed Internet and digital video services. Comcast said it earned 12 cents a share, compared with a net loss of $22 million, or a penny a share, in the second quarter last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,Hartford Courant | March 28, 2004
In the attic, in the garage, in the shed or in the basement, you just can't have too much storage. The same goes for personal computing. It's long past the days when we marveled about how quickly we filled up those once seemingly bottomless 1-, 2- and 5-gigabyte hard drives. The reality is that having available hard-drive space is only a temporary condition. No matter how big a new drive is, you'll find a way to fill it -- and probably quite soon. What's gobbling up the gigabytes is data.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2000
My problem is choosing a camcorder so that I can use it with the new IEEE 1394 (FireWire) digital video cards for Windows PCs. Some have i.LINK DV interface and others have i.LINK IEEE 1394 digital video interface. I do not understand FireWire. The Canon Ultura has been recommended to me; would I be able to play my Sony analog tapes on this camera? In this reviewer's strong opinion, backward compatibility with one's existing videotapes is the single most important feature in a camcorder for use with the glorious new home computer high-speed digital video editing feature known as FireWire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | March 18, 2004
The MICROMV digital video cassette has allowed Sony to make what it calls the smallest digital video camcorder in the world. But unlike some of the other downsized gadgets I've played with, I think the Sony DCR-IP1 MICROMV Handycam ($1,200) makes the case that quality can come in small packages. This camcorder, which is just a little bigger than a couple of decks of cards pushed together, fits easily into a shirt pocket. The tape is 70 percent smaller than other Mini-DV camcorder tapes.
NEWS
February 12, 2004
The crime report is a sampling of crimes in Howard County compiled from police. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 410-313-3700. East Columbia Stevens Forest Road: 5600 block, Oakland Mills. Someone forced a ground-floor window of a home and stole video game systems and digital video discs between 8 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Feb. 2. Berger Road: 9200 block, Kings Contrivance. Police responding to the Lube Center found a broken window and cash stolen about 11 p.m. Feb. 5. Tamar Drive: 8900 block, Long Reach.
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