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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
The television is being revolutionized. Last year, consumers saw high-definition digital TV become the standard in homes across the nation. And now 3-D TVs are for sale. The next step may be a moving television set. A coalition of broadcasters and other companies are putting the finishing touches on new technology that would bring digital television directly to cell phones, laptops and gadgets embedded in automobiles. The mobile devices would receive TV signals, not Internet video you can watch now. The new technology is being tested in the Washington-Baltimore area and in several other regions across the country.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
The television is being revolutionized. Last year, consumers saw high-definition digital TV become the standard in homes across the nation. And now 3-D TVs are for sale. The next step may be a moving television set. A coalition of broadcasters and other companies are putting the finishing touches on new technology that would bring digital television directly to cell phones, laptops and gadgets embedded in automobiles. The mobile devices would receive TV signals, not Internet video you can watch now. The new technology is being tested in the Washington-Baltimore area and in several other regions across the country.
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NEWS
By (C) 1997, KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE INFORMATION SERVICES | April 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Here are answers to some questions about digital television:Q. How is digital television different from existing television?A. The digital signals can carry more information, capable of producing more detailed pictures, clearer images, brighter colors and sharper sound on the same amount of broadcast bandwidth.Q. Will I have to buy a new television set?A. Not for several years. The Federal Communications Commission expects traditional broadcasts to continue along with digital service until about 2006.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | June 16, 2009
Some disgruntled viewers remain in the dark after last week's digital television switch-over. "We were not able to watch 60 Minutes on Channel 13," said Hanuman Agrawal, 73, a retired Owings Mills resident. "My wife had to read her magazine and books. It was an enormous inconvenience." Television stations say the problems are largely confined to households with antenna problems, or those where digital converter boxes have not been reset to account for frequency changes at some stations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1996
Ending years of squabbling, the broadcasting, consumer electronics and computer industries will announce an agreement today on a technical standard for the next generation of television.The accord, which is subject to approval by the Federal Communications Commission, opens the door for the crystal-clear pictures and expanded services promised by digital television. It also sets up a titanic battle for the nation's living rooms between computer companies and TV set manufacturers, both of which want to build the digital device that will display these images.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 14, 2008
In the minutes of our retirement community town meeting, I find that the property management committee is concerned about our having to change to HDTV in 2009. I'm pretty sure I've read in your column that HDTV and digital TV are two different things. Am I correct? - Anne Townes All HDTV is digital, but not all digital is HDTV. Here's how to think of it. Draw a big circle and label it digital. Then draw a smaller circle inside it and label it HDTV. HDTV is a subset, a part, of digital TV. Digital just means the signal is sent out in the language of computers into tiny hunks of information that are assembled at the other end. That conversion to digital means cleaner signals.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 9, 1998
Digital television arrives tonight on PBS.While you won't be able to experience it if you don't own a digital set -- and who does? -- several PBS programs this week have information that may help you decide if you want to buy one.WETA (Channel 26), in Washington, is one of seven PBS stations that will actually start transmitting a digital signal tonight. Maryland Public Television (MPT, Channels 22 and 67) will begin digital broadcasting in 2000.PBS' first digital showpiece, "Chihuly Over Venice," airs at 9. It looks at a project by glass artist Dale Chihuly to create spectacular chandeliers to hang over the canals of Venice.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael K. Powell expects to postpone until early next year a vote on his plan to convert the U.S. television system to digital technology by January 2009, a Powell aide said yesterday. Broadcasters such as the Walt Disney Co.'s ABC network have lobbied against the plan, saying consumers aren't prepared to switch to digital television sets. Police and fire-safety groups have pushed the transition because it would free airwaves for emergency services.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
With the switch to all-digital television exactly a year away, vouchers to defray the cost of converter boxes necessary to keep older sets working will begin hitting the mail this week - and officials are urging people to request them early, as they are going fast. The federal government is offering each family up to two $40 vouchers to purchase the boxes, which will translate digital broadcast signals so they can be viewed on analog TVs. But the number of requests for the vouchers has been higher than predicted, raising concerns that the $1.5 billion set aside by the government might not be enough to meet consumer demand.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
From its seventh-floor studio in a Greenbelt high-rise, tiny WRAV-TV Channel 58 airs a multicultural smorgasbord -- Chinese news, Philippine talk shows, Haitian music, programs 24-hours-a-day for a faithful audience that also includes Indians, Iranians and Vietnamese.But its studio light could go dark one day soon. The signals of hundreds of small community stations across the country may be snuffed out by an economic and technological steamroller: digital television.TV regulators say the move is necessary for technical progress and the larger good.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Kaltenbach and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Kaltenbach,frank.roylance@baltsun.com and Chris.Kaltenbach@baltsun.com | June 13, 2009
Laura Wilson thought she was ready for the much-anticipated conversion from analog to digital over-the-air TV. The 73-year-old Bolton Hill resident bought digital converter boxes for both her sets, and she had volunteers from Americorps stop by her apartment last week to make sure she was all hooked up. But when local stations ended analog transmissions Friday afternoon, Wilson punched up her local channels and the screen on her living room set read...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 27, 2009
Turns out that getting ready for the big digital transition, set (for now) to go off three weeks from today, involves more than simply updating your TV, buying a converter box or making sure your cable or satellite subscriptions are up-to-date. Consumers also have to contend with old VCRs, problematic reception and cable companies whose schedules don't quite jibe with everyone else's. For months now, broadcast TV stations have been heralding the changeover from analog to digital, through commercial spots, news segments, even special programs like the one that aired last night on Maryland Public Television.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 13, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama's call for a delay in next month's conversion from analog to digital TV appears to be gaining support, although local television stations are still preparing for the Feb. 17 switch that has been in the works for more than a decade. As directed by Congress during the Clinton administration, broadcast TV stations in the U.S. - that is, those that can be received without a cable or satellite system - will be switching their transmission signals from the traditional analog to digital.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
With the switch to all-digital television exactly a year away, vouchers to defray the cost of converter boxes necessary to keep older sets working will begin hitting the mail this week - and officials are urging people to request them early, as they are going fast. The federal government is offering each family up to two $40 vouchers to purchase the boxes, which will translate digital broadcast signals so they can be viewed on analog TVs. But the number of requests for the vouchers has been higher than predicted, raising concerns that the $1.5 billion set aside by the government might not be enough to meet consumer demand.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 14, 2008
In the minutes of our retirement community town meeting, I find that the property management committee is concerned about our having to change to HDTV in 2009. I'm pretty sure I've read in your column that HDTV and digital TV are two different things. Am I correct? - Anne Townes All HDTV is digital, but not all digital is HDTV. Here's how to think of it. Draw a big circle and label it digital. Then draw a smaller circle inside it and label it HDTV. HDTV is a subset, a part, of digital TV. Digital just means the signal is sent out in the language of computers into tiny hunks of information that are assembled at the other end. That conversion to digital means cleaner signals.
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Wailin Wong and Jon Van and Wailin Wong,Chicago Tribune | January 22, 2008
A prime piece of invisible real estate is going up for auction this week, and the winners of the $10 billion virtual land grab have the potential to shake up wireless communications in the United States. The property in question is a sizable swath of the country's radio spectrum that television broadcasters are returning to the government as they convert from analog to digital systems. The frequencies, known as the 700 megahertz spectrum, are ideal for wireless communications, and 214 bidders will vie for the rare opportunity to nab a piece of the coveted spectrum.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
IT'S 2 O'CLOCK on a Tuesday afternoon in Maryland, circa 2003.Four-year-old Sally is watching "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" on Maryland Public Television-1. Elsewhere, Jane, 34, is earning credits toward a sociology degree on MPTV-2. Frank, 14, is in school watching MPTV-3; he's learning about the social and economic factors that led to World War I. And 64-year-old Bill, a retiree, is at home watching a debate live from the City Council chambers on MPTV-4.Now it's 2 o'clock on a Tuesday afternoon in Maryland, January 1999.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | January 17, 2008
A recent column ... on the advent of digi- tal television made me wonder what the switch to digital radio will mean to me. As I understand it, this will become a reality in the coming months. Does it mean that the old AM/FM radio I have had for years is kaput? - S. Beckner There's a big difference between the approach of digital television and the move toward digital radio. In the case of television, the switch to digital transmissions in 2009 is required by the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | January 6, 2008
There's a lot of confusion about the move toward digital TV. What you might not know may end up costing you more than it's worth. The Economic Crimes Unit of the Colorado district attorney's office is warning consumersof scam artists who might try to sell you digital equipment you may not need in preparation for the big digital TV push. Currently, TV stations in the United States are airing digital television signals and most will continue to provide analog signals, too. But by Feb. 17, 2009, full-power TV stations will cease broadcasting on their current analog channels.
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