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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 12, 2004
Four summers ago, Michael Broumberg sat, glued to his television set, trying to witness every highlight of the 2000 Olympics. This year, the mass marketing of a revolutionary technology has changed how he and millions of Americans are watching TV. With just a few clicks of a button, the retired environmental specialist plans to program a digital video recorder - best known by the brand name TiVo - to capture Olympic events from swimming to shot put....
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
It's getting a bit crowded in the Ducketts Lane Elementary School media center. In addition to about two dozen fifth-graders from the school assembled before a projection screen, media specialist Matthew Winner has invited about two dozen cyberspace invaders — a class from Rossville, Ind. — who show up courtesy of Skype. Students in both classrooms can see one another and take turns waving. Ducketts Lane students are accustomed to the interaction — Winner has allowed them to Skype with similar classes from as far away as China.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp.'s aspirations of competing with the cable television industry will take a significant step forward Dec. 18 when it launches a long-delayed technical trial of its futuristic digital video network in Dover Township, N.J.The Philadelphia-based telephone company announced yesterday that the free trial will involve 200 households.The trial will be the first public test of the digital technology Bell Atlantic is betting on to provide the fully interactive voice, video and data network of the future.
NEWS
By Larry Schmidt and S. Dallas Dance | March 25, 2013
When today's high school seniors started kindergarten in 2000, there was no iPhone, text messaging was hardly used, and very few K-12 students took online classes. While virtually every other arena has seen rapid change over the past decade, K-12 education has remained virtually the same. However, we cannot successfully educate today's students to succeed in tomorrow's world with yesterday's curriculum and instructional methods. Together, we at the Baltimore County Board of Education and Baltimore County Public Schools propose to propel our school system and students forward with a bold new theory of action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 4, 2004
It was a cold January evening in 1987 when Tim Quirk and two other members of the punk band Too Much Joy piled into a station wagon for the drive from New York to Toronto. The 500-mile trek to the World Records studio took all night. But it was the kind of inconvenience the band was willing to endure to get their debut album, Green Eggs and Crack, pressed into vinyl as cheaply as possible. They spent a day mastering the tapes, adjusting the sound levels on each track. The mastered tapes were played back on an oversized, malevolent-looking turntable that physically carved grooves into a mold that would become one side of the record.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
Bell Atlantic Mobile announced yesterday that it will begin offering digital cellular phone service in parts of the Baltimore-Washington area today, giving it a jump on rival Cellular One in the race to eliminate the static and increase the privacy of wireless calls.That's if you listen to Bell Atlantic. If you listen to Cellular One, Bell Atlantic is making a big deal about rolling out digital technology in a small part of its region when Cellular One is the real leader in the field.But if you ask Herschel Shosteck, both companies are blowing smoke.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
In a move expected to help push radio into the digital age, Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit announced yesterday that the two have agreed to merge. The two companies - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - will become iBiquity Digital Corp. The companies called the combination a "merger of equals," though specific financial terms weren't disclosed. Lucent Technologies Inc., Lucent Digital Radio's parent, will be the venture's biggest investor, followed by Viacom Inc., one of 30 companies backing USA Digital.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
Six years ago, Howard County was the first in the state to use film-based red-light cameras to identify and fine scofflaws who blow through traffic lights. The state's first digital camera is in operation at Snowden River Parkway and McGaw Road in Columbia. Howard is leading a push to upgrade red-light cameras from wet-film to digital technology by the end of this year, police said. Two key reasons for the switch to digital: better clarity of photographic images and more efficient processing, according to Lt. Tim Black, a Howard County police officer.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1997
The battle for Baltimore's cellular phone market is going increasingly digital, with the area's largest cellular carrier announcing today that it will begin offering service based on digital technology.Bell Atlantic Nynex Mobile said it will offer the digital service as an alternative to traditional cellular, which uses analog technologies much more prone to static interruption and -- as the speaker of the House can attest -- to wiretapping.Competitors and analysts said Bell Atlantic had little choice: the entry of Sprint Spectrum's all-digital Personal Communications Service (PCS)
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
"The Simpsons," "The X-Files" and "ER" are among the television shows that Dan Vayda and his brother Tom love to watch.But they say neither they -- nor their parents -- would want to shell out tons of money to watch the shows on digital television.The two Baltimore County residents, and others at Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s over-the-air demonstration yesterday, were skeptical about the initial costs of digital technology.It will cost between $4,000 and $12,000 to buy all the equipment needed for a basic digital TV."
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In George Orwell's novel "1984," the unblinking eye of government surveillance is omnipresent and inescapable. Orwell could not have known what technology would one day make his nightmare scenario possible, but he could foresee that whatever it was, the government would misuse it. This week, the Supreme Court agreed. In a case that for the first time sought to put limits on the government's growing use of digital technology to monitor Americans, the justices came down firmly on the side of privacy.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
Laura Patzer, 17, a junior at Mariotts Ridge High School, couldn't get poor Pluto out of her head after the cold blue rock was demoted from planet to dwarf planet. So she decided to make a movie imagining the scene at the "council of planets" when Pluto was kicked out. Her film, called Planets, is one of 18 that will be shown tonight at the third Howard County Film Festival at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. "It's a comedy, like a parody of popular film, where Pluto is being kicked off the council of the planets," Patzer said.
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Imax Corp. may be staring at a bigger mountain of problems than the climbers in Everest, the hit documentary shown in its gargantuan-screen theaters. Troubles for the company started this year with the disclosure of an informal inquiry by the Securities and Exchange Commission into whether revenue was improperly booked. That news caused Imax's stock to tumble sharply. Nine lawsuits have been filed by shareholders. And the company has had trouble finding a buyer at a time when it needs to expand and upgrade to digital technology.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2006
It seems a no-brainer that copying a DVD movie and reselling it should be illegal. But how about copying it to your iPod? Or, if you're a professor, copying snippets of Citizen Kane to illustrate a point in your film class? Well, the answer is "No, you can't" on the iPod. But academics can freely capture Kane's "Rosebud" moment and other highlights, courtesy of a decision by the U.S. Copyright Office that went into effect last week. The rulings highlight the same murky legal frontier where copyright law meets burgeoning digital technology.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
The future, as we all know, will belong to the techno-savvy whizzes who can write computer programming code in their sleep. According to this conventional wisdom, the health of our economy depends on educating a new cadre of technocrats and engineers ready to do battle for the U.S. in the digital wars. That's hogwash, says, among others, author Dan Pink, whose book A Whole New Mind draws up a very different blueprint for economic success in the 21st century. "We tend to obsess on high tech, high tech, high tech," he says.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
First, there's the "Wow!" factor. Visitors to the darkened Science on a Sphere Theater at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are immediately awed by the glowing "planet" that appears to float three feet off the floor, spinning slowly in space. "Oooh! Neat!" gushed a gaggle of second-graders from Crofton as they crowded the rail protecting the eerie, 6-foot orb. As they watched, it transformed magically from a majestic, blue-green Earth to a rusty, barren Mars. A few youngsters reached out to see if it was solid, or an illusion of light -- a hologram.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In George Orwell's novel "1984," the unblinking eye of government surveillance is omnipresent and inescapable. Orwell could not have known what technology would one day make his nightmare scenario possible, but he could foresee that whatever it was, the government would misuse it. This week, the Supreme Court agreed. In a case that for the first time sought to put limits on the government's growing use of digital technology to monitor Americans, the justices came down firmly on the side of privacy.
BUSINESS
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,Los Angeles Times | December 17, 2006
Imax Corp. may be staring at a bigger mountain of problems than the climbers in Everest, the hit documentary shown in its gargantuan-screen theaters. Troubles for the company started this year with the disclosure of an informal inquiry by the Securities and Exchange Commission into whether revenue was improperly booked. That news caused Imax's stock to tumble sharply. Nine lawsuits have been filed by shareholders. And the company has had trouble finding a buyer at a time when it needs to expand and upgrade to digital technology.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 30, 2005
CLARKSBURG, W.Va. -In a sprawling complex tucked in the hills of this Appalachian town, a roomful of supercomputers attempt to sift America's guilty from its innocent. This is where the FBI keeps its vast database of fingerprints, allowing examiners to conduct criminal checks from computer screens in less than 30 minutes - something that used to take them weeks as they rummaged through 2,100 file cabinets stuffed with inked print cards. But the same digital technology that has allowed the FBI to so speed up such checks over the past few years has created the risk of accusing people who are innocent, the Chicago Tribune has found.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 4, 2004
It was a cold January evening in 1987 when Tim Quirk and two other members of the punk band Too Much Joy piled into a station wagon for the drive from New York to Toronto. The 500-mile trek to the World Records studio took all night. But it was the kind of inconvenience the band was willing to endure to get their debut album, Green Eggs and Crack, pressed into vinyl as cheaply as possible. They spent a day mastering the tapes, adjusting the sound levels on each track. The mastered tapes were played back on an oversized, malevolent-looking turntable that physically carved grooves into a mold that would become one side of the record.
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