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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems, the cellular arm of Bell Atlantic Corp., said yesterday that it has placed orders for 40,000 cellular phones that can handle both analog and digital signals, making it one of the first cellular operators in the country to move ahead with dual-use phones.The new phones are in use experimentally in a few markets but are not commercially available.The phones are designed to switch easily between traditional analog signals and digital signals, which use a newer technology to transmit communications.
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NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
Just before doctors turned on her new bionic ear yesterday, Heather Whitestone McCallum saw that her son, John, 6, had lost a baby tooth as he ate a sandwich. When the device was activated, McCallum got to hear John explain what happened. "A seed in the bread took it off," John said, holding the tooth out to show his mother, who smiled and nodded. "I like his voice," said McCallum, who underwent cochlear implant surgery six weeks ago at the Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance in Baltimore and returned yesterday for the activation.
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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | February 6, 2002
Some viewers of Maryland Public Television may find it difficult to get a clear picture during daylight hours over the next few days. From today through Friday, the state broadcaster will suspend its Annapolis-based signal to allow workers to assemble a new tower near an existing one, the network's officials said. Subscribers to cable television should continue to receive the station on Channel 22, although at times there could be a weakened signal. But those in Central Maryland and the Washington suburbs who watch on regular broadcast television, or those who have satellite television, are likely to have their reception significantly disrupted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2005
If you bought an LCD flat-panel television last year, you probably paid about $4,000 for a 36-inch model. And you probably should refrain from reading the next paragraph. According to research firm ISuppli Corp., which tracks consumer electronics prices, that type and size of TV is now selling, on average, for about $2,700. That trend is likely to continue for a while: ISuppli predicts that a 36-inch liquid-crystal-display television will go for about $880 in 2008. But you have to pick your moment to plunge in - and then avoid obsessing about subsequent prices.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems, the cellular arm of Bell Atlantic Corp., said yesterday it has placed orders for 40,000 cellular phones that can handle both analog and digital signals, making it one of the first cellular operators in the country to move ahead with the dual-use phones.The new phones are in use experimentally in a few markets but are not commercially available.The phones are designed to switch easily between traditional analog signals and digital signals, which use a newer technology to transmit communications.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2005
Federal regulators accelerated yesterday the deadline under which new mid-size televisions must be capable of receiving higher-quality digital signals. The Federal Communications Commission said all mid-size sets - models between 25 and 36 inches - sold in the United States must have digital tuners by March 1, four months earlier than the prior deadline. Half of those sets are required to have the devices by July 1 of this year, a separate deadline the FCC kept in place yesterday over manufacturers' complaints.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Sinclair Broadcast Group, the Hunt Valley broadcaster that is one of the nation's largest independent owners of television stations, has settled a long-running dispute with Comcast Corp. that will allow viewers of Sinclair stations to watch programs in high-definition. The disagreement reached a critical point in January when Comcast subscribers in Baltimore and in Baltimore County complained that they wouldn't be able to watch the Super Bowl in high-definition because Sinclair wouldn't allow the cable company to carry the digital signal for its Fox affiliate.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - TV viewers may have until 2009 to obtain television sets able to receive digital signals. The reason: Lawmakers and the Federal Communications Commission want to wean TV stations off the analog broadcasting spectrum and onto digital broadcasting, but they don't think consumers will be ready to switch by the end of 2006, the current legal deadline. So they're eyeing a loophole that gets them around the 2006 due date: The law also says the transition to digital sets should come once 85 percent of American households own TVs that get digital signals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
At least one piece of household technology has yet to become a full-fledged player in the digital revolution: the television set. But last week, the Federal Communications Commission took its most forceful action in that direction since Congress decided that over-the-air television signals should go digital. The commission ruled that TV manufacturers must include tuners that receive digital signals in every television with a 13-inch screen or larger after June 30, 2007. Beginning in July 2004, at least half of all large-screen televisions sold must have the DTV receiver.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
Just before doctors turned on her new bionic ear yesterday, Heather Whitestone McCallum saw that her son, John, 6, had lost a baby tooth as he ate a sandwich. When the device was activated, McCallum got to hear John explain what happened. "A seed in the bread took it off," John said, holding the tooth out to show his mother, who smiled and nodded. "I like his voice," said McCallum, who underwent cochlear implant surgery six weeks ago at the Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance in Baltimore and returned yesterday for the activation.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
CAFTA protects U.S. producers of military apparel William Hawkins' column "Trade deal would put foreign firms on equal footing with U.S. companies" (Opinion * Commentary, June 17) was misleading. Mr. Hawkins implies that the U.S.-Central American/Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) would allow Central American and Dominican textile and apparel companies to sell uniforms to the U.S. armed forces. Nothing could be further from the truth. A U.S. law known as the Berry Amendment requires the U.S. military to buy all clothing and footwear from the United States - and made with U.S. fibers, yarns, fabrics and trims.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 10, 2005
Federal regulators accelerated yesterday the deadline under which new mid-size televisions must be capable of receiving higher-quality digital signals. The Federal Communications Commission said all mid-size sets - models between 25 and 36 inches - sold in the United States must have digital tuners by March 1, four months earlier than the prior deadline. Half of those sets are required to have the devices by July 1 of this year, a separate deadline the FCC kept in place yesterday over manufacturers' complaints.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Sinclair Broadcast Group, the Hunt Valley broadcaster that is one of the nation's largest independent owners of television stations, has settled a long-running dispute with Comcast Corp. that will allow viewers of Sinclair stations to watch programs in high-definition. The disagreement reached a critical point in January when Comcast subscribers in Baltimore and in Baltimore County complained that they wouldn't be able to watch the Super Bowl in high-definition because Sinclair wouldn't allow the cable company to carry the digital signal for its Fox affiliate.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE TIMES | January 8, 2005
LAS VEGAS - If the Consumer Electronics Show reveals future trends, then the world is poised for a huge television-buying spree. The show features computers, phones and stereos in all shapes and sizes, but the 1.5 million square feet of exhibits are dominated by thousands of TVs, from tiny ones in cell phones to a 102-inch monster that Samsung calls the world's largest plasma television. All the keynote speeches this week have focused heavily on TV. Technology companies such as Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - TV viewers may have until 2009 to obtain television sets able to receive digital signals. The reason: Lawmakers and the Federal Communications Commission want to wean TV stations off the analog broadcasting spectrum and onto digital broadcasting, but they don't think consumers will be ready to switch by the end of 2006, the current legal deadline. So they're eyeing a loophole that gets them around the 2006 due date: The law also says the transition to digital sets should come once 85 percent of American households own TVs that get digital signals.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
In what's been described as the biggest leap for radio since the introduction of FM, the first high-definition radio receivers going on sale this week will bring listeners CD-quality sound and on-demand weather, traffic and news. Kenwood USA sold its first black box digital receiver Monday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where KZIA-FM Z102.9 radio station broadcasts digitally. Several manufacturers from Delphi to Panasonic are unveiling new HD radio receivers - some of which will go on sale this year - at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID COLKER and DAVID COLKER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2005
If you bought an LCD flat-panel television last year, you probably paid about $4,000 for a 36-inch model. And you probably should refrain from reading the next paragraph. According to research firm ISuppli Corp., which tracks consumer electronics prices, that type and size of TV is now selling, on average, for about $2,700. That trend is likely to continue for a while: ISuppli predicts that a 36-inch liquid-crystal-display television will go for about $880 in 2008. But you have to pick your moment to plunge in - and then avoid obsessing about subsequent prices.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
In what's been described as the biggest leap for radio since the introduction of FM, the first high-definition radio receivers going on sale this week will bring listeners CD-quality sound and on-demand weather, traffic and news. Kenwood USA sold its first black box digital receiver Monday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where KZIA-FM Z102.9 radio station broadcasts digitally. Several manufacturers from Delphi to Panasonic are unveiling new HD radio receivers - some of which will go on sale this year - at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
At least one piece of household technology has yet to become a full-fledged player in the digital revolution: the television set. But last week, the Federal Communications Commission took its most forceful action in that direction since Congress decided that over-the-air television signals should go digital. The commission ruled that TV manufacturers must include tuners that receive digital signals in every television with a 13-inch screen or larger after June 30, 2007. Beginning in July 2004, at least half of all large-screen televisions sold must have the DTV receiver.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik | February 6, 2002
Some viewers of Maryland Public Television may find it difficult to get a clear picture during daylight hours over the next few days. From today through Friday, the state broadcaster will suspend its Annapolis-based signal to allow workers to assemble a new tower near an existing one, the network's officials said. Subscribers to cable television should continue to receive the station on Channel 22, although at times there could be a weakened signal. But those in Central Maryland and the Washington suburbs who watch on regular broadcast television, or those who have satellite television, are likely to have their reception significantly disrupted.
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