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BUSINESS
By Elizabeth Sanger and Elizabeth Sanger,Newsday | July 27, 1993
The biggest alliance of the digital revolution, so far, was hatched over a lunch of burritos and enchiladas.On one side of the table sat Dennis Patrick, an executive with Time Warner, the world's biggest media and entertainment company and the nation's second-largest cable provider. On the other side was his friend, Laird Walker, a vice president for US West, a regional phone company based in Colorado.On March 5, 1992, as they split a plate of black bean nachos at the Austin Grill in Washington, D.C., the phone and cable industries were thought to be fierce rivals: The cable industry was looking to offer some form of phone service over its networks; phone companies were fighting for the right to deliver video programming over their lines.
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MOBILE
June 27, 2012
Call us what you want -- Millennials, Generation Y, Generation We -- it doesn't change the reality that most of us grew up just as one era ended and another began. We're old enough to remember what life was like before high-speed Internet, but young enough to lead the digital revolution. In the meantime, we're dealing with our shortened attention spans, student debt and smartphone obsession. Photo galleries: 10 personality traits of the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's 7 defining moments Movie quotes for the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's TV idols
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BUSINESS
By G. Pascal Zachary and G. Pascal Zachary,Wall Street Journal VVB | February 19, 1992
The Digital Revolution has reached Glasgow, Ky.In this small town 100 miles south of Louisville, the local electric utility has installed a two-way monitoring system that can conserve electricity by automatically shutting off water heaters and taking other load-reducing steps.The same network can deliver video images, news and information. So, in 1990, the Glasgow Electric Board became the town's second cable-TV provider, feeding broadcasts to about 1,800 residents for a fee. In response, the original cable company slashed rates and unsuccessfully asked a court to evict the utility from its turf.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
From the outside, Don Pedro's Musica Latina on Broadway looks like anything but a music store. You might guess it's a country-western emporium. Maybe even a secondhand sports-equipment store. Inside its display window, there are soccer balls, wool leopard-print comforters and dozens of sneaker boxes. But behind all that is where its real product lies: some 200,000 CDs from everywhere in Latin America. For years, Baltimore's ethnic music stores like this one were spared from the digital music revolution that consumed their American counterparts because of their deep catalogs.
MOBILE
June 27, 2012
Call us what you want -- Millennials, Generation Y, Generation We -- it doesn't change the reality that most of us grew up just as one era ended and another began. We're old enough to remember what life was like before high-speed Internet, but young enough to lead the digital revolution. In the meantime, we're dealing with our shortened attention spans, student debt and smartphone obsession. Photo galleries: 10 personality traits of the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's 7 defining moments Movie quotes for the Millennial Generation Millennial Generation's TV idols
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998
Computers. Cell phones. Fax machines. Pagers. CDs. VCRs. Walkmen. Web browsers. Nintendos. Networks. Scanners. Mice. Digital cameras.How many of these do you deal with every day? Probably more than a few. In fact, most of us couldn't live, work or play the way we do if it weren't for the digital revolution that has changed the face of society in a few short years.That's why we created Plugged In, The Sun's new personal technology section.We'll be here every Monday with stories and features about the latest technology and how it affects you. We'll discuss issues and ideas, along with hardware and software.
NEWS
July 20, 2009
In the continual cat-and-mouse game between corrections officials and the inmates they oversee, the newest form of contraband are cell phones smuggled into prisons by visitors, contractors and corrupt guards. Inmates use the devices to communicate with associates and direct criminal enterprises from behind prison walls almost as easily as if they were still on the streets. No one really knows how many contraband phones are floating around in the system, but over the last year Maryland has seen an increasing number of cases in which prisoners used cell phones to run drug operations, harass victims' families, plan escapes and even order witnesses killed to prevent them from testifying.
NEWS
By Nicholas Negroponte | February 15, 1995
Cambridge, Mass. -- WHEN SPEAKER Newt Gingrich spoke of buying laptop computers for needy Americans, critics promptly dismissed the idea as silly.But it is not silly at all.It raises a question that doesn't seem to have occurred to those who brushed aside his suggestion as a case of offering cake to the starving: Just who are the needy? Who are the have-nots?Most Americans over 30, rich or poor, have been left out of the digital world.Even though 35 percent of households have at least one personal computer, and home computers will represent 70 percent of PC sales this year, adults tend to use them for such specific purposes as word processing, simple accounting and business applications that allow them to work at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
This is Kayt Schenk's dream: One day the Internet will take its place alongside gunpowder and the printing press as a tool to bring about true revolution. But until then, she will be content to let her friends and family know such things as what's on her nightstand (Reading Lolita in Tehran), how far she walks her dog, Mabel (about 3 miles daily), and the results of her hydrostatic body-fat test (none of your business). Schenk, 30, started her personal Web site last March, when the Army stationed her husband in Germany and she moved from Decatur, Ga., to join him there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Dunn and Ashley Dunn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1999
If searching the World Wide Web for that one nugget of information already seems like a bad trip into a quagmire of data, Internet researchers have a bit of bad news for you -- the situation is only getting worse.Even the most comprehensive search engine today is aware of no more than 16 percent of the estimated 800 million pages on the Web, according to a study published last week in the scientific journal Nature. Moreover, the gap between what is posted on the Web and what is retrievable by the search engines is widening fast.
NEWS
July 20, 2009
In the continual cat-and-mouse game between corrections officials and the inmates they oversee, the newest form of contraband are cell phones smuggled into prisons by visitors, contractors and corrupt guards. Inmates use the devices to communicate with associates and direct criminal enterprises from behind prison walls almost as easily as if they were still on the streets. No one really knows how many contraband phones are floating around in the system, but over the last year Maryland has seen an increasing number of cases in which prisoners used cell phones to run drug operations, harass victims' families, plan escapes and even order witnesses killed to prevent them from testifying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
This is Kayt Schenk's dream: One day the Internet will take its place alongside gunpowder and the printing press as a tool to bring about true revolution. But until then, she will be content to let her friends and family know such things as what's on her nightstand (Reading Lolita in Tehran), how far she walks her dog, Mabel (about 3 miles daily), and the results of her hydrostatic body-fat test (none of your business). Schenk, 30, started her personal Web site last March, when the Army stationed her husband in Germany and she moved from Decatur, Ga., to join him there.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | July 18, 2004
Amy Lambert stood on her toes and peered over the Towson crowd, watching the Independence Day parade advance toward her. Camera in hand, she waited for the perfect shot. Almost, almost ... now. Snap! It was a keeper, she confirmed, previewing the picture with her 2-year-old son through a screen on the camera. But it didn't matter if it weren't: She could always delete it and try again. "That's a good thing about having a digital camera," the Lutherville mom said. There's no waste of film and no disappointment when prints reveal a wayward finger blocking the shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 31, 2003
Walt Disney Pictures, the most outspoken Hollywood studio on the threats of Internet piracy, for the first time will distribute its movies online. The studio will make about 50 of its titles, including Miramax releases Chicago and Gangs of New York, available next month through Movielink, an online film-rental service started through a joint venture of five movie studios. The deal represents a milestone for Movielink, which has increased its online movie catalog from 175 titles eight months ago to more than 400 films from six major studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Dunn and Ashley Dunn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1999
If searching the World Wide Web for that one nugget of information already seems like a bad trip into a quagmire of data, Internet researchers have a bit of bad news for you -- the situation is only getting worse.Even the most comprehensive search engine today is aware of no more than 16 percent of the estimated 800 million pages on the Web, according to a study published last week in the scientific journal Nature. Moreover, the gap between what is posted on the Web and what is retrievable by the search engines is widening fast.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998
Computers. Cell phones. Fax machines. Pagers. CDs. VCRs. Walkmen. Web browsers. Nintendos. Networks. Scanners. Mice. Digital cameras.How many of these do you deal with every day? Probably more than a few. In fact, most of us couldn't live, work or play the way we do if it weren't for the digital revolution that has changed the face of society in a few short years.That's why we created Plugged In, The Sun's new personal technology section.We'll be here every Monday with stories and features about the latest technology and how it affects you. We'll discuss issues and ideas, along with hardware and software.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | April 4, 1994
When Louis Rossetto and Jane Metcalfe launched Wired magazine last year, they weren't just aiming for a successful publication -- they wanted to make history."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 31, 2003
Walt Disney Pictures, the most outspoken Hollywood studio on the threats of Internet piracy, for the first time will distribute its movies online. The studio will make about 50 of its titles, including Miramax releases Chicago and Gangs of New York, available next month through Movielink, an online film-rental service started through a joint venture of five movie studios. The deal represents a milestone for Movielink, which has increased its online movie catalog from 175 titles eight months ago to more than 400 films from six major studios.
NEWS
By Nicholas Negroponte | February 15, 1995
Cambridge, Mass. -- WHEN SPEAKER Newt Gingrich spoke of buying laptop computers for needy Americans, critics promptly dismissed the idea as silly.But it is not silly at all.It raises a question that doesn't seem to have occurred to those who brushed aside his suggestion as a case of offering cake to the starving: Just who are the needy? Who are the have-nots?Most Americans over 30, rich or poor, have been left out of the digital world.Even though 35 percent of households have at least one personal computer, and home computers will represent 70 percent of PC sales this year, adults tend to use them for such specific purposes as word processing, simple accounting and business applications that allow them to work at home.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | April 4, 1994
When Louis Rossetto and Jane Metcalfe launched Wired magazine last year, they weren't just aiming for a successful publication -- they wanted to make history."
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