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By Jonathan Weber and Jonathan Weber,Los Angeles Times | April 23, 1991
LAS VEGAS, Nev. -- A divisive debate is raging in the radio industry over a new type of high-tech broadcasting system that will provide compact-disc quality sound and allow nationwide channels for the first time.Nearly everyone agrees that digital audio broadcasting, or DAB as the new technology is known, is so superior to existing AM and FM transmission that it will certainly be implemented, though probably not until late in the decade.But just as the advanced TV known as high-definition television has been embroiled in a series of technical, political and economic controversies, digital audio broadcasting has also become the focus of a high-stakes battle that pits AM stations against FM stations, big stations against small ones and all traditional broadcasters against newcomers that propose to send radio signals by satellites.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch , arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
Any radio can play the Grateful Dead, but it's another matter to transmit the voices of the merely deceased. That takes a bit of work on the radio with a wire cutter, maybe a pair of pliers, and - the skeptic might argue - a leap of faith. Jenny Stewart of Mount Airy, founder and head of the Paranormal Research and Resource Society, said she's done it many times, hearing and recording the dead speak through a $25 Radio Shack AM-FM digital radio modified to turn it into a device known in her field as a "ghost box."
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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
In a move expected to help push radio into the digital age, Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit announced yesterday that the two have agreed to merge. The two companies - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - will become iBiquity Digital Corp. The companies called the combination a "merger of equals," though specific financial terms weren't disclosed. Lucent Technologies Inc., Lucent Digital Radio's parent, will be the venture's biggest investor, followed by Viacom Inc., one of 30 companies backing USA Digital.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | January 17, 2008
A recent column ... on the advent of digi- tal television made me wonder what the switch to digital radio will mean to me. As I understand it, this will become a reality in the coming months. Does it mean that the old AM/FM radio I have had for years is kaput? - S. Beckner There's a big difference between the approach of digital television and the move toward digital radio. In the case of television, the switch to digital transmissions in 2009 is required by the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | January 17, 2008
A recent column ... on the advent of digi- tal television made me wonder what the switch to digital radio will mean to me. As I understand it, this will become a reality in the coming months. Does it mean that the old AM/FM radio I have had for years is kaput? - S. Beckner There's a big difference between the approach of digital television and the move toward digital radio. In the case of television, the switch to digital transmissions in 2009 is required by the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2002
The road to digital radio begins in Columbia. Last week's decision by the Federal Communications Commission giving the go-ahead for the new technology developed by iBiquity Digital Corp. could change the future of the medium. Within weeks, 50 radio stations in six major markets will begin broadcasting their signals digitally, using software made by Columbia-based iBiquity. For consumers, digital radio promises far better sound on AM and FM stations, and signals so smooth that bridges and electrical lines won't interfere with them.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
The Federal Communications Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a digital radio technology for local broadcasters that promises highly improved sound for consumers and new revenue streams for broadcasters. The approval was welcome news for Columbia-based iBiquity Digital Radio Corp., which created the technology that allows broadcasters to transmit digital and analog signals simultaneously. Pending the release of the FCC's order, which could occur as early as today, broadcasters who have ordered and installed the digital equipment could begin broadcasting digitally next week, but iBiquity had planned for broadcasters in six markets to begin using the technology later in the fall.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
Radio giant Clear Channel Communications Inc. has partnered with a Columbia company to begin the transition of 1,000 of its stations to digital - or "high definition" - broadcasting, which has been described as the biggest development in radio since the advent of FM. The move could help speed the industry's adoption of the technology, which offers CD-quality sound and screen data displays such as song titles and weather alerts. The company hopes to stave off a decline in listeners lured away by competing satellite radio, a paid service.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Imagine a radio with a screen that shows information about upcoming concerts or pictures of musical artists and their albums. With the creation of iBiquity Digital Corp., officials say such technology could become reality. Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - announced yesterday they had completed their merger after clearance by the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
Howard County firefighter Capt. John J. Fisher is ready to trust his radio. Fisher says his new 800- megahertz portable radio, a yellow-lime hand-held device nearly as heavy as a brick, works better than the old one, even though the new and old systems are technologically "patched" together until a countywide transition is complete. The old radio system for firefighters, police and other county agencies could be spotty in certain cases, such as deep inside buildings or in low-lying areas, said Fisher, who leads a tower-truck crew of 14 firefighters out of Station No. 7 near The Mall in Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
Radio giant Clear Channel Communications Inc. has partnered with a Columbia company to begin the transition of 1,000 of its stations to digital - or "high definition" - broadcasting, which has been described as the biggest development in radio since the advent of FM. The move could help speed the industry's adoption of the technology, which offers CD-quality sound and screen data displays such as song titles and weather alerts. The company hopes to stave off a decline in listeners lured away by competing satellite radio, a paid service.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
Howard County firefighter Capt. John J. Fisher is ready to trust his radio. Fisher says his new 800- megahertz portable radio, a yellow-lime hand-held device nearly as heavy as a brick, works better than the old one, even though the new and old systems are technologically "patched" together until a countywide transition is complete. The old radio system for firefighters, police and other county agencies could be spotty in certain cases, such as deep inside buildings or in low-lying areas, said Fisher, who leads a tower-truck crew of 14 firefighters out of Station No. 7 near The Mall in Columbia.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2002
The road to digital radio begins in Columbia. Last week's decision by the Federal Communications Commission giving the go-ahead for the new technology developed by iBiquity Digital Corp. could change the future of the medium. Within weeks, 50 radio stations in six major markets will begin broadcasting their signals digitally, using software made by Columbia-based iBiquity. For consumers, digital radio promises far better sound on AM and FM stations, and signals so smooth that bridges and electrical lines won't interfere with them.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
The Federal Communications Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a digital radio technology for local broadcasters that promises highly improved sound for consumers and new revenue streams for broadcasters. The approval was welcome news for Columbia-based iBiquity Digital Radio Corp., which created the technology that allows broadcasters to transmit digital and analog signals simultaneously. Pending the release of the FCC's order, which could occur as early as today, broadcasters who have ordered and installed the digital equipment could begin broadcasting digitally next week, but iBiquity had planned for broadcasters in six markets to begin using the technology later in the fall.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Imagine a radio with a screen that shows information about upcoming concerts or pictures of musical artists and their albums. With the creation of iBiquity Digital Corp., officials say such technology could become reality. Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - announced yesterday they had completed their merger after clearance by the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
In a move expected to help push radio into the digital age, Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit announced yesterday that the two have agreed to merge. The two companies - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - will become iBiquity Digital Corp. The companies called the combination a "merger of equals," though specific financial terms weren't disclosed. Lucent Technologies Inc., Lucent Digital Radio's parent, will be the venture's biggest investor, followed by Viacom Inc., one of 30 companies backing USA Digital.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch , arthur.hirsch@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
Any radio can play the Grateful Dead, but it's another matter to transmit the voices of the merely deceased. That takes a bit of work on the radio with a wire cutter, maybe a pair of pliers, and - the skeptic might argue - a leap of faith. Jenny Stewart of Mount Airy, founder and head of the Paranormal Research and Resource Society, said she's done it many times, hearing and recording the dead speak through a $25 Radio Shack AM-FM digital radio modified to turn it into a device known in her field as a "ghost box."
FEATURES
By Jonathan Weber and Jonathan Weber,Los Angeles Times | April 23, 1991
LAS VEGAS, Nev. -- A divisive debate is raging in the radio industry over a new type of high-tech broadcasting system that will provide compact-disc quality sound and allow nationwide channels for the first time.Nearly everyone agrees that digital audio broadcasting, or DAB as the new technology is known, is so superior to existing AM and FM transmission that it will certainly be implemented, though probably not until late in the decade.But just as the advanced TV known as high-definition television has been embroiled in a series of technical, political and economic controversies, digital audio broadcasting has also become the focus of a high-stakes battle that pits AM stations against FM stations, big stations against small ones and all traditional broadcasters against newcomers that propose to send radio signals by satellites.
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