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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 8, 2004
DIGITAL CAMERAS are no harder to use than traditional film models, but turning a digital image into a print can be a chore - particularly for people who have never gotten the hang of that file-and-folder thing on their hard drives. Making prints from film is certainly easy - just drop a roll at the drugstore or photo finisher and pick the shots up when they're ready. It can take as little as an hour, which is less time, frankly, than it takes to organize and print the same number of digital photos at home.
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NEWS
August 12, 2014
By its decision to regulate Uber as a "common carrier" ( "Uber is 'common carrier,' commission rules," Aug. 7), the Maryland Public Service Commission stands athwart the tide of technology and history. Allowed to stand, the ruling would harm Marylanders. Why restrict Uber's freedom of operation at all? The public love Uber's quick, reliable service. Virtually no one is complaining apart from taxicab companies. In our time of the Internet, global positioning systems and smartphones, the PSC's decision to prevent Uber from using its celebrated "surge pricing" to assure prompt service all across the area is nuts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dean Takahashi and Dean Takahashi,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 24, 2003
I've marked the progress in digital photography by my family's growth. When my first daughter was born in 1996, I considered buying a digital camera. But at the time, the overpriced one-megapixel cameras couldn't compete with the quality of film. I paid $300 for a 35 mm point-and-shoot film camera that produced great pictures. I scanned some and printed them on a $500 photo printer, with lousy results. When my second daughter was born in 2000, the film camera had broken. We took some instant camera shots and had them developed at the store.
SPORTS
February 3, 2013
Valentine valor Feb. 16-17: Terrapin Adventures in Savage will host its annual Romantic Adventure. Couples can declare their love as they jump from the "Leap of Faith" 40 feet in the air, fly on the zipline, experience a giant swing and dare to climb the high tower. Three hours, beginning at 9:30 a.m. or 1:30 p.m. The cost is $85 per couple. Information: TerrapinAdventures.com, 301-725-1313 or facebook.com/TerrapinAdventures. Saltwater Expo Feb. 23: The Saltwater Fishing Expo, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Annapolis Elks Lodge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2003
We're looking for people who want to share their experiences in digital photography. We want to know what's hard and what's easy, what's the most fun and what's the biggest frustration. If you're a digital snapshooter and want to talk about it, send e-mail to pluggedin@baltsun.com.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | February 24, 2009
Ritz Camera Centers Inc., the country's largest camera-store chain, filed for bankruptcy protection, blaming the deepening recession and the consumer transition to digital photography. The 91-year-old company, which had sales of almost $1 billion in 2008, has both assets and debt of less than $500 million, according to Chapter 11 reorganization papers filed Sunday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del. Ritz sought court permission to tap a new $85 million loan from existing secured lenders to continue operating under the reorganization plan.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
Your editorial "A sad 'Kodak' moment" of Jan. 21 clearly identified the problem that resulted in Kodak's bankruptcy as a lack of vision by the executives. As you pointed out, it's ironic that Kodak invented digital photography in 1976 but didn't move forward aggressively. Kodak's failure to capitalize on a technology that it invented is not the first example of an American company lacking the vision to fully develop products into marketable items. Ampex invented video recording only to see foreign companies such as Sony move the technology forward and capture the major share of the market while Ampex disappeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 18, 2002
When a friend's camera died after 20 years of service, he came to me with a question I'm hearing a lot these days: Should he replace Old Faithful with another film camera, or go digital? I wish there were an unequivocal answer. Digital photography has become much cheaper and more convenient over the past three years, and the quality of digital cameras aimed at the sub-$500 consumer market is so good today that it's hard to tell a digital print from an image recorded on film. Digital cameras are still more expensive than equivalent film equipment, but digital imaging has one great cost advantage over the long run - there's no film or traditional processing involved.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
By its decision to regulate Uber as a "common carrier" ( "Uber is 'common carrier,' commission rules," Aug. 7), the Maryland Public Service Commission stands athwart the tide of technology and history. Allowed to stand, the ruling would harm Marylanders. Why restrict Uber's freedom of operation at all? The public love Uber's quick, reliable service. Virtually no one is complaining apart from taxicab companies. In our time of the Internet, global positioning systems and smartphones, the PSC's decision to prevent Uber from using its celebrated "surge pricing" to assure prompt service all across the area is nuts.
NEWS
May 29, 2005
Code of conduct changes posted on county Web site Students who behave improperly on school buses may be suspended from transportation services under new procedures detailed in proposed changes to the Anne Arundel County public schools' student code of conduct. School board members will review the amendments at their meeting Wednesday. The draft includes guidelines for acceptable use of the Internet. In addition, the proposed definition for "inappropriate physical conduct" includes spitting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Once upon a time, people interested in taking a picture used a device known as a camera. Taking pictures was all that this device did. It could never make phone calls. Or play music and video. The pictures were captured on something called film, which came in a roll and had to be inserted into the camera. A certain number of photographs could be taken on each roll, and the used roll had to be removed from the camera to be developed. The development process took time. And chemicals.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
Workshop for parents The Department of Citizen Services' Office of Children's Services hosts "Will You Be My Friend?" from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 7 at the East Columbia 50+ Center inside the East Columbia Library, 6600 Cradlerock Way. Participants in this workshop will learn how to teach and model social and emotional skills. Free but space is limited. Pre-register by calling 410-313-1940 or e-mail children@howardcountymd.gov . Art show The Artists Gallery, in conjunction with the Columbia Festival of the Arts and Lakefest 2012, presents an all-member, all-media "buy local" art show that includes works in oils, watercolor, collage, acrylic, pastel, colored pencil, traditional photography, hand-colored photography, digital photography, stained glass, clay and mixed media.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
Your editorial "A sad 'Kodak' moment" of Jan. 21 clearly identified the problem that resulted in Kodak's bankruptcy as a lack of vision by the executives. As you pointed out, it's ironic that Kodak invented digital photography in 1976 but didn't move forward aggressively. Kodak's failure to capitalize on a technology that it invented is not the first example of an American company lacking the vision to fully develop products into marketable items. Ampex invented video recording only to see foreign companies such as Sony move the technology forward and capture the major share of the market while Ampex disappeared.
NEWS
January 1, 2011
Exhibit Slayton House Gallery is hosting a two-person exhibit, featuring Jeff Shi's digital photography in "Spirit of Nature" as well as Xiangfei Fay Shi's photography. The exhibit runs Thursday, Jan. 6, through Feb. 5 at the gallery, 10400 Cross Fox Lane, Columbia. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and is closed Sundays. There will be a reception open to the public, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8. Information: 410-730-3987.
NEWS
January 1, 2011
Exhibit Slayton House Gallery is hosting a two-person exhibit, featuring Jeff Shi's digital photography in "Spirit of Nature" as well as Xiangfei Fay Shi's photography. The exhibit runs Thursday, Jan. 6, through Feb. 5 at the gallery, 10400 Cross Fox Lane, Columbia. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and is closed Sundays. There will be a reception open to the public, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8. Information: 410-730-3987.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | November 6, 2000
If ever two technologies were made for each other, digital photography and the Web were soul mates from the start. Over the past 18 months, dozens of Web sites have appeared that allow you to share digital photos in online albums and order prints or photo-enhanced gifts. Now that photofinishing has become part of the mix, you don't even need a digital camera to join in. By checking off a box when you drop off your film - or mailing it to an online processor - you can have your negatives scanned into digital photos and posted on the Web from the start.
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