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Gus G. Sentementes | October 18, 2012
I was at the Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit this morning in downtown Baltimore, where I caught the Baltimore Ravens digital marketing guru, Michelle Andres, talking about how the NFL team handles the Internet, social media and apps. In short, the soup-to-nuts digital experience for both players and fans of the Ravens franchise. Sure, the team is covered by a lot of traditional media outlets, including us at The Baltimore Sun. But they've also become a digital marketing and publishing powerhouse in their own right.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
While Millennial Media pioneered mobile advertising, it now competes with online household names Google and Facebook, which dominate the $18 billion market. To Millennial CEO Michael Barrett, that's a good sign. But it's also meant a rough start to Barrett's tenure at the Baltimore-based firm. He took over in January for Paul Palmieri, who founded and led Millennial from its days as a startup in 2006 to its debut as a public company in 2012. As the company's stock tumbled amid a disappointing earnings report last month, Barrett acknowledged on an investor conference call there were challenges ahead and outlined a plan to address them.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 19, 1999
First the good news: Alan Price's "TotaPet" is the star of "State of the Arts: Digital Media Art from Maryland" at the Howard County Center for the Arts. A computer-animated video story with sound, it's a sophisticated use of its medium and a mature work of art that's entertaining and has a serious point.On the floor of a living room stands a little cage. Its door opens and out comes a small green creature with pods for hands and feet (better than ours in some ways) and eyes on two antenna-like extensions.
NEWS
By Sharon Sloane | March 31, 2014
America has crossed a few ominous thresholds that should give us pause. For one, poisonings are killing more people than car crashes in the United States, making them the leading cause of accidental death in the country for the first time. The vast majority of those deaths are from legal, prescription drugs. Second, more children report having been tormented and harassed online than in "real-life"; 43 percent of kids claim to be victims of such cyber-bullying. According to Yale University, victims of bullying are nearly 10 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
The new millennium may be two years away, but the Howard County Center for the Arts will offer a glimpse of things to come when it plays host next month to an exhibition of high-tech digital media art.The show, "State of the Arts: Digital Media from Maryland," will showcase the work of 17 Maryland artists who work with computer imagery and digital media to produce animation, color prints, sculpture and interactive artwork on CD-ROM.David Yager, director of the fine arts division at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is curator of the show, which features the work of several UMBC faculty members, graduate students and regional artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2002
27" Sony WEGA set proves that bigger isn't always better Figuratively speaking, a big-screen TV ain't no big thing. That might sound like home-theater heresy, but a huge screen isn't mandatory - particularly in a smaller room. The minimum suggested size for home theater is a 27-inch screen (measured diagonally). Sony's mid-level 27-inch WEGA, the $800 KV-27FS17, is a solid block of a TV (100-plus pounds) with a flat screen, dual-tuner picture-in-picture, a digital comb filter and a component video input for the highest-quality connection to a DVD player.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TV CRITIC | August 4, 2006
ABC made headlines in May when it became the first network to offer its top prime-time series free online after they aired. The results of that self-described "experiment" are in, with the network claiming that millions of young, affluent and highly educated consumers gave high marks to online viewing -- even with ads embedded in the shows. As a result, ABC will again offer episodes of its prime-time series free online this fall, though the network has declined to identify the shows. Among the findings: During May and June, ABC.com received 5.7 million requests to see episodes of Desperate Housewives, Lost, Alias and Commander in Chief.
BUSINESS
By Wailin Wong and Wailin Wong,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
CHICAGO -- Consumers have mobile phones and digital music players. They write e-mails, surf the Web and watch videos on YouTube. Yet digital publishers and manufacturers are still trying to convince consumers to modernize that most old-fashioned medium: the book. On Monday, Amazon.com Inc. entered the fray with Kindle, a $399 device that will try to do for books what the iPod did for music: use a new gadget to promote a digital-based industry. It's a flashy idea tied to the digital media revolution that has already upended both the music business and newspapers, which are scrambling to adjust.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
Will Davis may prefer to get his news and information through slick new methods, such as online social networking sites and news feeds, but he still keeps one old-tech method coming to his inbox: the e-mail newsletter. "I know if the information becomes one of 40 [news] feeds, it's less likely to cut through the clutter to me," said Davis, a 33-year-old Baltimore marketing professional who subscribes to two industry newsletters based in the Mid-Atlantic. "Because [newsletter] e-mails are a digest, you get all that information in one place."
NEWS
By Sharon Sloane | March 31, 2014
America has crossed a few ominous thresholds that should give us pause. For one, poisonings are killing more people than car crashes in the United States, making them the leading cause of accidental death in the country for the first time. The vast majority of those deaths are from legal, prescription drugs. Second, more children report having been tormented and harassed online than in "real-life"; 43 percent of kids claim to be victims of such cyber-bullying. According to Yale University, victims of bullying are nearly 10 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Triffon G. Alatzas, who has served The Baltimore Sun as head of digital media and also led the sports and business departments, was named top editor of the 176-year-old news organization Wednesday. As executive editor and a senior vice president of the Baltimore Sun Media Group, the Baltimore native will lead Maryland's largest newspaper, its websites and other digital platforms, as well as its community newspapers and magazines. "Growing up in Baltimore, it was always my dream to work for The Sun," said Alatzas, 46. "We have terrific journalists, and I get excited every day when I watch the passion, the excitement when people rally around a great story, the way folks work together.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 18, 2012
I was at the Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit this morning in downtown Baltimore, where I caught the Baltimore Ravens digital marketing guru, Michelle Andres, talking about how the NFL team handles the Internet, social media and apps. In short, the soup-to-nuts digital experience for both players and fans of the Ravens franchise. Sure, the team is covered by a lot of traditional media outlets, including us at The Baltimore Sun. But they've also become a digital marketing and publishing powerhouse in their own right.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
The cryptic email went out this week to some of the region's news media — including WMAR-TV and The Baltimore Sun — asking journalists to appear before the city's grand jury, which plans to spend the next few months analyzing the impact of crime coverage on efforts to end violence. It's a sort of term project squeezed in between criminal indictments, and a decades-old tradition for the panel. In addition to evaluating state's evidence, the 23 grand jurors in the city also examine a social issue during their four-month tenure and make recommendations for change.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
Amy Webb believes in the power of awesomeness so much that she wants to bring some to Baltimore. As the founder of Webbmedia Group, a Baltimore-based digital media consulting firm, Webb moves in technology circles, where the idea for the Awesome Foundation originated. The Boston-based foundation, begun in 2009, is encouraging the creation of chapters around the world. The idea is that a "dean" and 10 trustees at each chapter give $1,000 grants every month to a project in their community that they deem, ahem, awesome.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
Will Davis may prefer to get his news and information through slick new methods, such as online social networking sites and news feeds, but he still keeps one old-tech method coming to his inbox: the e-mail newsletter. "I know if the information becomes one of 40 [news] feeds, it's less likely to cut through the clutter to me," said Davis, a 33-year-old Baltimore marketing professional who subscribes to two industry newsletters based in the Mid-Atlantic. "Because [newsletter] e-mails are a digest, you get all that information in one place."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
As the U.S. Postal Service considers closing hundreds of post offices nationwide to save money, one question looms, especially for those 25 and younger: Who'd notice? During her freshman year at the University of Richmond, Kaitlyn McDowell enjoyed receiving the occasional letter with a care package from younger cousins. Beyond that, though, the 19-year-old from Ellicott City mostly corresponds by e-mail, text messaging and social networking, like many of her generation. "It's easier.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
As the U.S. Postal Service considers closing hundreds of post offices nationwide to save money, one question looms, especially for those 25 and younger: Who'd notice? During her freshman year at the University of Richmond, Kaitlyn McDowell enjoyed receiving the occasional letter with a care package from younger cousins. Beyond that, though, the 19-year-old from Ellicott City mostly corresponds by e-mail, text messaging and social networking, like many of her generation. "It's easier.
BUSINESS
By Wailin Wong and Wailin Wong,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
CHICAGO -- Consumers have mobile phones and digital music players. They write e-mails, surf the Web and watch videos on YouTube. Yet digital publishers and manufacturers are still trying to convince consumers to modernize that most old-fashioned medium: the book. On Monday, Amazon.com Inc. entered the fray with Kindle, a $399 device that will try to do for books what the iPod did for music: use a new gadget to promote a digital-based industry. It's a flashy idea tied to the digital media revolution that has already upended both the music business and newspapers, which are scrambling to adjust.
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