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By David H. Rothman | March 12, 2012
There are already tens of millions of e-book lovers, and their ranks are sure to be boosted by the latest iPad - along with improved Kindles, Nooks and their rivals. My sister, the retired fourth-grade teacher, has finally succumbed; Dorothy reads faster by enlarging the words on her tablet. And my wife favors e-books when she stretches out in bed. Clearly, the time has come for a well-stocked national digital library system, not to replace brick-and-mortar libraries but to augment them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
No bells and whistles went off today, but the Walters Arts Museum just won the distinction of providing the 10,000th entry in the World Digital Library , a Library of Congress project launched in 2009 that provides free Internet access to manuscripts, maps, books, works of art, photographs, films, recordings and more from every continent. The total number of images provided by those 10,000 entries is nearly 500,000. The Walters manuscripts that helped the digital library reach 10,000 entries include the Corvey Gospel Fragment from 10th-century Germany; the "Imperial" Menologion, a Greek church calendar from the 11th century; and the Ethiopian Gospel from the 16th century.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Johns Hopkins researchers are well on their way to building a digital library of children's brain images, which they say eventually will give doctors around the world access to a free Google-like search engine that could help diagnose and treat pediatric neurological disorders. The goal is for any doctor to be able to upload a patient's MRI scan, then wait for the computer to spit out results as it searches for images in the databank with similar patterns and known diagnoses. The databank, which has 7,000 brain images of Hopkins patients and counting, should be publicly available in three years, said Dr. Thierry Huisman, a professor of radiology, neurology and pediatrics and the director of pediatric radiology and neuroradiology at the Hopkins Children's Center.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Johns Hopkins researchers are well on their way to building a digital library of children's brain images, which they say eventually will give doctors around the world access to a free Google-like search engine that could help diagnose and treat pediatric neurological disorders. The goal is for any doctor to be able to upload a patient's MRI scan, then wait for the computer to spit out results as it searches for images in the databank with similar patterns and known diagnoses. The databank, which has 7,000 brain images of Hopkins patients and counting, should be publicly available in three years, said Dr. Thierry Huisman, a professor of radiology, neurology and pediatrics and the director of pediatric radiology and neuroradiology at the Hopkins Children's Center.
NEWS
February 7, 2001
THE KODAK GIRL COMES TO LIFE When George Eastman invented the simple-to-use Kodak camera, he used images of women to advertise his product. Thus was born the Kodak Girl. Zoom in and focus on the Kodak Girl Collection at www.kodakgirl.com. You'll find many images of the Kodak Girl from magazine ads, catalog covers, posters and more. The Toys and Figurines sections have photographs of camera-related toys, dolls and beautiful miniature figurines. Nominate a cool Web site at www.4Kids.org / nominations / KID QUEST: When was the Kodak Girl introduced in advertising?
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
SINCE JULY, Gail Stans- berry-Carbaugh has been doing much of her college research in the wee hours from her home in Frostburg. The 42-year-old sophomore at Allegany College of Maryland simply turns on her computer, taps in her college library card number and enters a vast store of information available to more than 200,000 Maryland college students and faculty. The Maryland Digital Library, up and running since last summer, contains 400 electronic books, 3,480 academic journals, 10 databases and three reference works, including the Oxford English Dictionary.
EXPLORE
February 25, 2012
A Letter from Mary Hastler, Director, Harford County Public Library: Recently Penguin Group publishing stopped offering new eBooks and digital audiobooks to public libraries and ended its relationship with the digital library distributor, Overdrive. From the website paidcontent.org "With this move, Random House becomes the only big-six publisher to allow unrestricted access to its eBooks in libraries-though it will raise prices beginning in March. " Harford County Public Library customers are savvy readers and demand for books in eBook format has increased dramatically over the past year.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 14, 2010
The other Sunday afternoon, the Natty Bohs were flying out of my local tavern. After a lunch, patrons were buying the six-packs of beer I knew as National Bohemian for home consumption. A few days later, I observed thirsty neighbors load up on cartons of the brew at a liquor store. Has 1964 come back again? I marvel at the Boh revival. The beer that people turned their backs on 30 years ago is a hit again — and has been for a while now. But I'll confess: Every time I hear this product called Natty Boh, I cringe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
No bells and whistles went off today, but the Walters Arts Museum just won the distinction of providing the 10,000th entry in the World Digital Library , a Library of Congress project launched in 2009 that provides free Internet access to manuscripts, maps, books, works of art, photographs, films, recordings and more from every continent. The total number of images provided by those 10,000 entries is nearly 500,000. The Walters manuscripts that helped the digital library reach 10,000 entries include the Corvey Gospel Fragment from 10th-century Germany; the "Imperial" Menologion, a Greek church calendar from the 11th century; and the Ethiopian Gospel from the 16th century.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | December 30, 2008
We're in the midst of a digital conversion, a coast-to-coast switcheroo, but this one hasn't been dreamed up by the federal government, no one's scrambling for rebate coupons and it has nothing to do with HDTV. In this fully volunteer conversion, people are saying so long to their CD players and connecting either an iPod or a computer stocked with a music library directly to a sound system. It's a digital-for-digital swap, CD for PC, born of convenience and the iTunes-fueled method of purchasing new music, digital downloads.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | February 1, 2014
Andrew Carnegie was a social Darwinian. He wanted to give the fittest the tools to rise to the top. Public libraries - as spreaders of skills, knowledge and culture - advanced his goal. Often hailed as Carnegie II, Bill Gates is if nothing else a champion of standardized testing and other forms of meritocracy. So here's a not-so-modest proposal for one of planet Earth's richest people, now worth around $78.5 billion. Update Carnegie's vision. Work toward a national digital library endowment, which, as I'll show, could boost K-12 test scores.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | March 12, 2012
There are already tens of millions of e-book lovers, and their ranks are sure to be boosted by the latest iPad - along with improved Kindles, Nooks and their rivals. My sister, the retired fourth-grade teacher, has finally succumbed; Dorothy reads faster by enlarging the words on her tablet. And my wife favors e-books when she stretches out in bed. Clearly, the time has come for a well-stocked national digital library system, not to replace brick-and-mortar libraries but to augment them.
EXPLORE
February 25, 2012
A Letter from Mary Hastler, Director, Harford County Public Library: Recently Penguin Group publishing stopped offering new eBooks and digital audiobooks to public libraries and ended its relationship with the digital library distributor, Overdrive. From the website paidcontent.org "With this move, Random House becomes the only big-six publisher to allow unrestricted access to its eBooks in libraries-though it will raise prices beginning in March. " Harford County Public Library customers are savvy readers and demand for books in eBook format has increased dramatically over the past year.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 14, 2010
The other Sunday afternoon, the Natty Bohs were flying out of my local tavern. After a lunch, patrons were buying the six-packs of beer I knew as National Bohemian for home consumption. A few days later, I observed thirsty neighbors load up on cartons of the brew at a liquor store. Has 1964 come back again? I marvel at the Boh revival. The beer that people turned their backs on 30 years ago is a hit again — and has been for a while now. But I'll confess: Every time I hear this product called Natty Boh, I cringe.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | December 30, 2008
We're in the midst of a digital conversion, a coast-to-coast switcheroo, but this one hasn't been dreamed up by the federal government, no one's scrambling for rebate coupons and it has nothing to do with HDTV. In this fully volunteer conversion, people are saying so long to their CD players and connecting either an iPod or a computer stocked with a music library directly to a sound system. It's a digital-for-digital swap, CD for PC, born of convenience and the iTunes-fueled method of purchasing new music, digital downloads.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
SINCE JULY, Gail Stans- berry-Carbaugh has been doing much of her college research in the wee hours from her home in Frostburg. The 42-year-old sophomore at Allegany College of Maryland simply turns on her computer, taps in her college library card number and enters a vast store of information available to more than 200,000 Maryland college students and faculty. The Maryland Digital Library, up and running since last summer, contains 400 electronic books, 3,480 academic journals, 10 databases and three reference works, including the Oxford English Dictionary.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | February 1, 2014
Andrew Carnegie was a social Darwinian. He wanted to give the fittest the tools to rise to the top. Public libraries - as spreaders of skills, knowledge and culture - advanced his goal. Often hailed as Carnegie II, Bill Gates is if nothing else a champion of standardized testing and other forms of meritocracy. So here's a not-so-modest proposal for one of planet Earth's richest people, now worth around $78.5 billion. Update Carnegie's vision. Work toward a national digital library endowment, which, as I'll show, could boost K-12 test scores.
NEWS
February 7, 2001
THE KODAK GIRL COMES TO LIFE When George Eastman invented the simple-to-use Kodak camera, he used images of women to advertise his product. Thus was born the Kodak Girl. Zoom in and focus on the Kodak Girl Collection at www.kodakgirl.com. You'll find many images of the Kodak Girl from magazine ads, catalog covers, posters and more. The Toys and Figurines sections have photographs of camera-related toys, dolls and beautiful miniature figurines. Nominate a cool Web site at www.4Kids.org / nominations / KID QUEST: When was the Kodak Girl introduced in advertising?
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