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Digital Harbor High School

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NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
A few years ago, when Andrew Coy was a teacher at Digital Harbor High School, he offered his students a chance to learn Web design. He quickly realized those sorts of extracurricular activities were lacking, even at the tech-savvy institution in Federal Hill. Now Coy and a team at the Digital Harbor Foundation are working to create more of those opportunities for hundreds of students across the city each year. For the past year and a half, they've been doing it just blocks from Coy's old classroom, at a former city recreation center on Light Street.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
A Digital Harbor High School student is being disciplined and new safety checks have been implemented at the school after the student "threatened the safety and security" of the school community Monday, according to a letter sent home to parents Wednesday. The incident was "brought promptly under control" and no one was injured, but the student will face "disciplinary action" under the school system's code of conduct and under the law, Principal Brian K. Eyer wrote in the letter.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Work has been completed on a multipurpose synthetic turf field in Locust Point that Under Armour is donating to the city. The Baltimore-based sports apparel company, which has headquarters in Locust Point, on Tuesday unveiled Banner Field at Latrobe Park, a donation through Under Armour's WIN Baltimore Initiative to give youth greater access to sports. Under Armour did not disclose the donation amount. Construction of the 89,000-square-foot field started in April and includes a scoreboard, surrounding walk/run path, lighting, tiered seating and parking.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
Baltimore city educators, parents and members of the public will have the opportunity to sound off this week on what they're looking for in the next Baltimore city schools CEO during a series of public forums that will take place throughout the city.  The first, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will speak, is scheduled for Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. The forums will be led by the executive search firm, Ray and Associates Inc., which will also conduct private focus groups with political leaders, community organizations and school officials this month.  Additionally, those interested can weigh in on the search by taking this survey.  The survey closes Oct. 15. Below is the schedule of public forums, provided by the city school system: •    Tuesday, October 1 o    6-7:30 p.m. - Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 1400 W. Coldspring Lane Media Center (Ground Floor)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Digital Harbor High School staff and police met with parents Tuesday evening to reassure the community that they are taking steps to ensure that children are safe in the classroom and on their way home. Baltimore police are deploying officers around the Federal Hill school for the next two weeks after threats and violent attacks on Latino students. Many of the roughly 50 parents who attended were Latinos. Some asked what was being done to make sure their students could board their buses without being attacked or having their cellphones stolen - a recurring problem this year, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
There's nothing even vaguely woolly about the 3-foot-long, 16-inch-high, blue-and-black contraption known as The Electric Sheep. Though it scoots about on four wheels, it can "kick" a ball by ejecting a forceful blast of air. It can maneuver through a low tunnel and transform itself into a ramp on which other vehicles can climb. The machine can even "think" for itself for brief periods, with an on-board camera that orients toward one of four goals on the playing field. The Sheep is amazingly cool, and it was designed, built and operated by 10 students at Baltimore's Digital Harbor High School.
NEWS
By Andrea R. Bowden | June 12, 2014
Digital Harbor High School is a diverse, inclusive and successful school that prepares students for computer technology careers, college and productive citizenship. Recent media coverage about tensions among small groups of black and Latino students would suggest a divisive culture, but nothing could be further from the truth. Our demographics, philosophy and daily dealings with each other belie such a notion. Our 1,352 students - roughly three quarters of which are male to one quarter female - come from every sector of the city and 35 countries.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Destiny Hartis had made up her mind. She would be elected Digital Harbor High School's prom queen at the school's senior prom on May 15, she remembers thinking that night -- even if it meant spending part of the dance gathering votes from her fellow classmates. "It was my day," said Hartis, 20, who attended the end-of-year event with her cousin, Kerstin Jones, in a long blue dress. "I was going to win. " And she did -- becoming the Baltimore high school's first transgender student in faculty memory to walk away with the prom queen's crown and sash.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It was just a moment of poor teenage judgment: One student threw a marker across a classroom at Digital Harbor High, sparking an argument between a Latino student and a black student. Since they couldn't fight in class, they agreed to meet after school on Federal Hill. The fight was a nasty one, and the Latino boy was sent to the hospital with a concussion. Then word spread, and though school leaders believe the incident wasn't about race, it was impressions that mattered last week.
NEWS
By Andrea R. Bowden | June 12, 2014
Digital Harbor High School is a diverse, inclusive and successful school that prepares students for computer technology careers, college and productive citizenship. Recent media coverage about tensions among small groups of black and Latino students would suggest a divisive culture, but nothing could be further from the truth. Our demographics, philosophy and daily dealings with each other belie such a notion. Our 1,352 students - roughly three quarters of which are male to one quarter female - come from every sector of the city and 35 countries.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It was just a moment of poor teenage judgment: One student threw a marker across a classroom at Digital Harbor High, sparking an argument between a Latino student and a black student. Since they couldn't fight in class, they agreed to meet after school on Federal Hill. The fight was a nasty one, and the Latino boy was sent to the hospital with a concussion. Then word spread, and though school leaders believe the incident wasn't about race, it was impressions that mattered last week.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Digital Harbor High School staff and police met with parents Tuesday evening to reassure the community that they are taking steps to ensure that children are safe in the classroom and on their way home. Baltimore police are deploying officers around the Federal Hill school for the next two weeks after threats and violent attacks on Latino students. Many of the roughly 50 parents who attended were Latinos. Some asked what was being done to make sure their students could board their buses without being attacked or having their cellphones stolen - a recurring problem this year, they said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Destiny Hartis had made up her mind. She would be elected Digital Harbor High School's prom queen at the school's senior prom on May 15, she remembers thinking that night -- even if it meant spending part of the dance gathering votes from her fellow classmates. "It was my day," said Hartis, 20, who attended the end-of-year event with her cousin, Kerstin Jones, in a long blue dress. "I was going to win. " And she did -- becoming the Baltimore high school's first transgender student in faculty memory to walk away with the prom queen's crown and sash.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
Baltimore city educators, parents and members of the public will have the opportunity to sound off this week on what they're looking for in the next Baltimore city schools CEO during a series of public forums that will take place throughout the city.  The first, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will speak, is scheduled for Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. The forums will be led by the executive search firm, Ray and Associates Inc., which will also conduct private focus groups with political leaders, community organizations and school officials this month.  Additionally, those interested can weigh in on the search by taking this survey.  The survey closes Oct. 15. Below is the schedule of public forums, provided by the city school system: •    Tuesday, October 1 o    6-7:30 p.m. - Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 1400 W. Coldspring Lane Media Center (Ground Floor)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
A proposal to impose the largest toll increases in the state's history received a hostile reception from residents Monday night as the Maryland Transportation Authority brought its proposal to Baltimore for public comment. Several dozen people turned out for the hearing at Digital Harbor High School, though a relative handful signed up to speak. Those who did were almost unanimous in their opposition to the authority's two-phase proposal to raise tolls in October and again in July 2013.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
State Del. Pat McDonough, who stirred controversy this week when he said "roving mobs of black youth" terrorize Baltimore, shrugged off criticism Friday that he is using shock tactics to raise his political profile. McDonough, a Republican who represents Baltimore and Harford counties, refused to apologize for his comments. He has called for Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat, to assign the Maryland State Police to fight the "consistent and dangerous attacks" in the city. McDonough has hosted a conservative talk show on WCBM for 20 years.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
A Digital Harbor High School student is being disciplined and new safety checks have been implemented at the school after the student "threatened the safety and security" of the school community Monday, according to a letter sent home to parents Wednesday. The incident was "brought promptly under control" and no one was injured, but the student will face "disciplinary action" under the school system's code of conduct and under the law, Principal Brian K. Eyer wrote in the letter.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
State Del. Pat McDonough, who stirred controversy this week when he said "roving mobs of black youth" terrorize Baltimore, shrugged off criticism Friday that he is using shock tactics to raise his political profile. McDonough, a Republican who represents Baltimore and Harford counties, refused to apologize for his comments. He has called for Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat, to assign the Maryland State Police to fight the "consistent and dangerous attacks" in the city. McDonough has hosted a conservative talk show on WCBM for 20 years.
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