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By Jim Clark | February 19, 2014
As parents, we spend countless hours trying to keep our kids balanced, so that they get just the right mix of physical and mental stimulation. Sometimes that means limiting their computer and Internet time so they can play outdoors or focus on something other than a screen. I know I hear myself say this at least three times a week at home with my own two children. But what about kids who don't have as much digital access as ours? What about kids who don't own computers, whose families don't subscribe to broadband at home or who have to go to the library just to finish their homework?
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
More than 40 guests, including families, children, Harford County officials, library representatives and members of the Harford County Public Library Foundation attended the launch of the Little Leapers 3.5 program on March 5 at the Edgewood library. This innovative program will offer the library's youngest customers the opportunity to use iPad minis in the children's departments of the Edgewood, Aberdeen and Abingdon branches and through the Rolling Reader and Silver Reader. The iPad minis are part of the next phase of Little Leapers, the highly successful STREAM program launched in 2013.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
More than 40 guests, including families, children, Harford County officials, library representatives and members of the Harford County Public Library Foundation attended the launch of the Little Leapers 3.5 program on March 5 at the Edgewood library. This innovative program will offer the library's youngest customers the opportunity to use iPad minis in the children's departments of the Edgewood, Aberdeen and Abingdon branches and through the Rolling Reader and Silver Reader. The iPad minis are part of the next phase of Little Leapers, the highly successful STREAM program launched in 2013.
NEWS
By Jim Clark | February 19, 2014
As parents, we spend countless hours trying to keep our kids balanced, so that they get just the right mix of physical and mental stimulation. Sometimes that means limiting their computer and Internet time so they can play outdoors or focus on something other than a screen. I know I hear myself say this at least three times a week at home with my own two children. But what about kids who don't have as much digital access as ours? What about kids who don't own computers, whose families don't subscribe to broadband at home or who have to go to the library just to finish their homework?
NEWS
By Craig Peck, Larry Cuban and Heather Kirkpatrick | May 19, 2000
THE PHRASE "digital divide" suffuses American consciousness. It implies that while the well-off (and mostly white) communicate and prosper in revolutionary ways -- Web surfing, e-mail, e-commerce, IPOs, stockoptions -- the poor (and mostlyminority) suffer as a computer-less, Internet-challenged underclass. This divide, we're told, is sure to have disastrous effects not only for the digitally excluded, but also for the country's future financial health. "Where will we possibly find enough technology workers?"
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 10, 1999
BARBARA Mikulski's family maintains the rights to the original raisin bread recipe from its old Polish-American bakery, now Dorothea's, on Eastern Avenue. The other day, the senator's eyebrows popped an inch as she wondered aloud about getting Dorothea's to market the bread online.Yeah, that's the ticket. Mikulski's Old World Raisin Bread on the World Wide Web. Why not? Everyone else seems to be using the Internet for buying and selling these days. Why not a U.S. senator with strong ethnic roots?
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson and Tyrone Taborn | July 21, 1999
A different Al Gore showed up early this month at Unity 99, the largest gathering of minority journalists in the United States. Taking center stage before 6,000 people in Seattle, a looser Mr. Gore was no longer a campaign in search of a theme, but rather a man with something to say.What Mr. Gore has to say is pretty important to those who want to continue watching stock portfolios grow and building these mini-mansions in Baltimore County: America's economic...
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | April 13, 2009
T.J. and Tevin Graise are fast becoming computer whizzes. Using the family computer, the brothers scour the Internet for data and graphics that will make homework projects sparkle. T.J. has built Web pages and downloaded music. And their mother, Latonya Wyche, prepared spreadsheets for her job as an insurance specialist. A few months ago, such computer proficiency was all but absent in the family's Howard County household. But after the brothers were identified by their school, Harper's Choice Middle, as lacking a home computer, they - along with 14 others families - were given a new one. They also received a printer and software.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | February 21, 2000
D. Anne Browne knows the "digital divide" is real, but she doesn't buy the underlying argument that blacks aren't online. In fact, she's betting on it. As a Web developer, she caters to a growing African-American audience where, she says, opportunity abounds. "I know how things about black people get distorted," said Browne, a Randallstown resident who created the site Agoodblackman. com. "Black people are too good at too many things to be lousy at this." Her sentiments are echoed by Internet analysts, developers and Web surfers who say that a U.S. Commerce Department report on the digital divide that was released last summer doesn't tell the whole story.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
SINCE JULY, Gail Stans- berry-Carbaugh has been doing much of her college research in the wee hours from her home in Frostburg. The 42-year-old sophomore at Allegany College of Maryland simply turns on her computer, taps in her college library card number and enters a vast store of information available to more than 200,000 Maryland college students and faculty. The Maryland Digital Library, up and running since last summer, contains 400 electronic books, 3,480 academic journals, 10 databases and three reference works, including the Oxford English Dictionary.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
The Internet could eventually be as ubiquitous as the air we breathe if the Federal Communications Commission moves forward with a plan to allow free access to an unused portion of the broadcast spectrum. The WiFi networks that would flourish on that bandwidth could powerfully transform our lives and spur massive innovation in the economy - if the idea can get past the multi-billion dollar interests standing in its way. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski is spearheading the public WiFi effort on the grounds that it could lead to whole new industries of products and services, but the idea would also serve the agency's mission to reduce the digital divide by expanding the availability of high-speed Internet access and reducing its cost.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
There's no denying the convenience and simplicity of shopping online. Successful retailers like Amazon.com and Overstock.com have become giants as a result. Small wonder that online sales have grown to an estimated $200 billion annually, or about 7 percent of all retail transactions that take place in this country. But should taxpayers be forced to subsidize the industry? That's essentially what happens now as the bulk of digital sales are not subject to state and local sales taxes.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | April 13, 2009
T.J. and Tevin Graise are fast becoming computer whizzes. Using the family computer, the brothers scour the Internet for data and graphics that will make homework projects sparkle. T.J. has built Web pages and downloaded music. And their mother, Latonya Wyche, prepared spreadsheets for her job as an insurance specialist. A few months ago, such computer proficiency was all but absent in the family's Howard County household. But after the brothers were identified by their school, Harper's Choice Middle, as lacking a home computer, they - along with 14 others families - were given a new one. They also received a printer and software.
NEWS
June 2, 2008
Rules reinforce the digital divide One important fact that has been almost completely missing from the debate over the Internet regulations sought by Google and other Internet companies ("Net danger," editorial, May 20) is how those proposed regulations could impede the universal broadband-service access all parties to the debate say that they support. While the U.S. has made great strides in making high-speed Internet service available and affordable to almost every household, there are some substantial obstacles staring us straight in the eye. For example, data show that African-Americans and Hispanics subscribe to broadband services at lower rates than white people do. And while cable and DSL services reach an estimated 95 percent of the country, new fiber-to-the-home networks now reach only about 13 percent of the nation's communities - and most of these communities are high-income and suburban, leaving many poor and minority neighborhoods at a disadvantage.
NEWS
By E. Faye Williams | September 27, 2006
Despite spectacular gains in the last decade in making new technologies available to ever more Americans, the so-called digital divide - the racial and ethnic chasm that separates the digital haves from the have-nots - persists. Whether it's access to computers, dial-up Internet or broadband services, minority communities still seem to be getting the short end of the high-tech stick. The statistics speak for themselves. Only a small fraction of minority households subscribe to broadband Internet: 14 percent for African-Americans and 12.5 percent for Latinos, according to the National Poverty Center.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Reporter | September 10, 2006
I don't even remember when I bought my mother her cell phone for Christmas, but I do know it's been so long that when it broke a few years ago, the company couldn't repair it because the parts weren't available anymore. The cell phone representative was quite startled when she learned the make and model -- a virtual antique -- and quickly sent an upgrade. Trouble is, my mother rarely turns it on. It hardly mattered until recently, when I had to reach them right away. My mother's uncle had died in upstate New York.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
Dr. Samuel L. Banks High in Northeast Baltimore bills itself as a school focused on technology. But the school has about 700 students and only 60 computers, nearly half of which don't work or don't have Internet access, teachers and students say. There are three printers, and for weeks this fall, none of them had ink. One teacher, Brad Fields, got permission from the principal to solicit donated computers and wire classrooms for Internet access himself....
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