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By E.R. Shipp | July 19, 2014
Derek Jeter's impending retirement from Major League Baseball after 20 years, marked by emotional tributes during the All Star Game last week, is not the only reason this New York Yankees fan has been unsettled by the passage of time. JET magazine, the pocket-sized source of news about blacks since 1951, has bowed to the ages and gone digital with a new app. But its debut digital issue this month makes clear that JET is no longer the magazine for anyone who claims to be at least middle-aged.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
A few years ago, when Andrew Coy was a teacher at Digital Harbor High School, he offered his students a chance to learn Web design. He quickly realized those sorts of extracurricular activities were lacking, even at the tech-savvy institution in Federal Hill. Now Coy and a team at the Digital Harbor Foundation are working to create more of those opportunities for hundreds of students across the city each year. For the past year and a half, they've been doing it just blocks from Coy's old classroom, at a former city recreation center on Light Street.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1993
Stock of the Digital Equipment Corp. surged yesterday as Wall Street reacted to a better-than-expected earnings report.Analysts had been expecting a loss in excess of $110 million for the company's second fiscal quarter, which ended Dec. 26. But the company said it had a loss of only $74 million, compared with a loss of $155 million in the corresponding quarter last year. Revenues surged 6 percent from a year earlier, to $3.7 billion.The most recent loss was also much narrower than the $261 million loss reported for the first fiscal quarter.
NEWS
Jeff Johnson | September 3, 2014
From ice bucket challenges to the upcoming midterm elections, we are reminded again and again how the Internet has changed the way we live and connect and organize. Digital equality has become fundamental to economic, cultural and political equality. Until this year's Oscar "selfie" by Ellen DeGeneres, the most tweeted picture in our history was the re-election photo of President and Mrs. Obama embracing. But the more important the Internet becomes, the more critical it is that this digital public square be open to all - if we've learned anything in recent years, it's that authorities are far too quick to shut down protests, silence journalists or even lock down communities when it serves them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 23, 2001
IMAGINE THAT YOU'RE researching material for a speech or presentation and run across a magazine article with information you need. You copy the article on your office copy machine and take it home to work on the project. The next morning, as you walk out the door, a couple of FBI agents greet you with handcuffs. They whisk you off to a jail 2,000 miles away, where you face trial on charges that could put you in the slammer for five years and cost you half a million dollars in fines. "Hey," you say. "I didn't commit any crime.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 30, 2001
Richard Linklater has an effortlessly ironic view of big-time directing. Enthralled as he is by the classics of world filmmaking - he's a moving force behind the adventurous Austin Film Society - he loves quoting the great directors of the past with amusement as well as affection. Over the phone from Texas a month ago, he said "I'm most proud of a scene when you set up a structure and boom! - what you want to happen does happen so spontaneously." I told him that reminded me of a famous quote from John Huston: "If you do it right, the thing happens, right there on the screen."
NEWS
December 2, 2013
In his commentary "Bitcoin and international crime" (Nov. 25) E.J. Fagan vilifies cryptocurrency for aiding criminals and enabling their crimes. He vilifies Johns Hopkins professor Matthew Green and fellow researchers for their work on the ZeroCoin currency. By extension, he scolds Johns Hopkins University for supporting this research. I do share Mr. Fagan's concerns about the outcomes of these systems. But Mr. Fagan fails to acknowledge that the widespread adoption of anonymous cryptocurrencies is inevitable.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 6, 1992
BOSTON -- Robert B. Palmer, the new president and chief executive of the Digital Equipment Corp., said yesterday that the company was being restructured into eight to 10 "customer-focused" business units by the end of the year.Managers of the individual units would have "complete responsibility for business strategy, investments, revenue generation and profit and loss statements," he said.Addressing the company's first annual meeting of shareholders since he succeeded Digital's founder, Kenneth H. Olsen, in July, Palmer said he would announce the specific units and the executives in charge of each by the end of December.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 1, 1993
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Digital Equipment Corp., which watched Silicon Valley's personal computer juggernaut crush its minicomputer business, now hopes it can best some of the valley's biggest companies in another battle: disk drives.The Maynard, Mass., company has announced four new disk drives as part of a plan to dominate the large-capacity high end of the market and compete head-on with emerging products from Silicon Valley heavyweights such as Seagate Technology Inc., Maxtor Inc., Conner Peripherals and Quantum Corp.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN MANES | November 20, 1995
AS HE WATCHED AN electronic message crawl across his screen at a glacial 300 bits per second, Rip Van Digital fell asleep at the keyboard of his wonderful new personal computer. The desk calendar was open to November 1981.Mr. Van Digital awakened last week and called his stockbroker. His shares in the manufacturer of his computer, he learned to his great chagrin, had not made him a wealthy man. But when he ventured next door to borrow a fresh carton of milk, Mr. Van Digital was flabbergasted.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Work has been completed on a multipurpose synthetic turf field in Locust Point that Under Armour is donating to the city. The Baltimore-based sports apparel company, which has headquarters in Locust Point, on Tuesday unveiled Banner Field at Latrobe Park, a donation through Under Armour's WIN Baltimore Initiative to give youth greater access to sports. Under Armour did not disclose the donation amount. Construction of the 89,000-square-foot field started in April and includes a scoreboard, surrounding walk/run path, lighting, tiered seating and parking.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 19, 2014
Derek Jeter's impending retirement from Major League Baseball after 20 years, marked by emotional tributes during the All Star Game last week, is not the only reason this New York Yankees fan has been unsettled by the passage of time. JET magazine, the pocket-sized source of news about blacks since 1951, has bowed to the ages and gone digital with a new app. But its debut digital issue this month makes clear that JET is no longer the magazine for anyone who claims to be at least middle-aged.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
First came the switch off of the gold standard. Then checkbooks and credit cards started the shift away from cash - but to bitcoin advocates, not far enough. As the anonymous digital currency gains favor with retailers such as Overstock.com and is welcomed by California and other states, some in Baltimore are trying to boost adoption locally. They argue that bitcoin is the next logical step beyond credit cards, offering greater security without transaction costs. But they also acknowledge a sort of chicken-and-egg problem when it comes to getting consumers to adopt bitcoin and retailers to accept it. In Baltimore, some tech advocates, a few business owners and the entrepreneurs behind the local startup Bitsie aim to encourage acceptance among local shops and to promote broader education about how bitcoin works, and why more people should use it. That means overcoming challenges, including volatile exchange rates and a lack of any central regulation of bitcoin, factors that make some question whether the currency will ever gain mainstream traction.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
One of Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah's bright ideas has evolved into a feature film that will be unveiled worldwide next week. The project began in 2012 when Kwei-Armah was looking for a way to celebrate his theater's 50 t h anniversary. He asked such nationally known playwrights as Christopher Durang, Neil LaBute and the Baltimore-born Anna Deavere Smith to answer the question, "What is my America?" and then turned their responses into three-minute films.
NEWS
By Andrea R. Bowden | June 12, 2014
Digital Harbor High School is a diverse, inclusive and successful school that prepares students for computer technology careers, college and productive citizenship. Recent media coverage about tensions among small groups of black and Latino students would suggest a divisive culture, but nothing could be further from the truth. Our demographics, philosophy and daily dealings with each other belie such a notion. Our 1,352 students - roughly three quarters of which are male to one quarter female - come from every sector of the city and 35 countries.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 17, 1992
MAYNARD, Mass. -- Kenneth H. Olsen, the founder and president of Digital Equipment Corp. and a computer industry legend, said yesterday that he would retire, ending 35 years at the helm of the world's second-largest computer company.Robert B. Palmer, Digital's vice president of manufacturing and logistics, will be named by the board of directors later this month to succeed Mr. Olsen.Mr. Olsen, who is 66, co-founded Digital with $70,000 in borrowed money in 1957 and single-handedly built it into a $15 billion force in the computer marketplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2004
More and more venues are becoming "hotspots" - places where your portable computer, PDA, cell phone or other wireless Web-enabled device can access the Internet. Using the wireless 802.11x protocol better known as Wi-Fi, these hotspots can be found in airports, libraries, coffee houses, restaurants, shopping malls and just about any other public location you can imagine. But unless there's a sign posted somewhere, you may not be able to easily find one. Normally, the only way to find a hotspot is to turn on your portable computer and have it see whether it can detect the Wi-Fi signal.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
It was just a moment of poor teenage judgment: One student threw a marker across a classroom at Digital Harbor High, sparking an argument between a Latino student and a black student. Since they couldn't fight in class, they agreed to meet after school on Federal Hill. The fight was a nasty one, and the Latino boy was sent to the hospital with a concussion. Then word spread, and though school leaders believe the incident wasn't about race, it was impressions that mattered last week.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
While Millennial Media pioneered mobile advertising, it now competes with online household names Google and Facebook, which dominate the $18 billion market. To Millennial CEO Michael Barrett, that's a good sign. But it's also meant a rough start to Barrett's tenure at the Baltimore-based firm. He took over in January for Paul Palmieri, who founded and led Millennial from its days as a startup in 2006 to its debut as a public company in 2012. As the company's stock tumbled amid a disappointing earnings report last month, Barrett acknowledged on an investor conference call there were challenges ahead and outlined a plan to address them.
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