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By SUSAN DEITZ and SUSAN DEITZ,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 3, 1993
Q: Bravo to "Another Nice Guy Who's Given Up!" I'd like to stand in line behind him and add another comment to his list of complaints about women:Taking a first date out to dinner. It seems as if women had been let out of a cage -- lobster, alcoholic drinks, expensive dessert with no regard to the payer's pocket. And to top it off, the complete turn off when she opens her purse and states: "Oh, I forgot to bring my cigarettes."The important thing in these women's lives seems to be where they can be taken, not whom they are with.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011
1.Grave Digger: Most popular monster truck. Created in 1981, there have been 24 different Grave Diggers used. Monster truck legend Dennis Anderson will drive. 2.Maximum Destruction: Nine-time world champion Tom Meents will drive this truck in the star-studded show. 3.Monster Mutt Dalmatian: Driven by Candace Jolly, the only female driver in the show. 4.Grave Digger the Legend: This will be helmed by Anderson's son, Adam. Dennis' other son, Ryan, will also be racing the event.
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FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 17, 2004
If some of the funniest guys in Hollywood - the Coen Brothers, Tom Hanks and Marlon Wayans - couldn't remake a hit out of the 1955 Brit comedy The Ladykillers, what prayer do the hacks who stick National Lampoon in front of their movie titles have? That would be "no prayer." If National Lampoon's Gold Diggers had a single laugh, it would die of loneliness. The comedy represents a new nadir for the Lampoon brand. John Belushi isn't hanging out in Animal House anymore and Van Wilder (2002)
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 17, 2010
Digger sped to the lead, turned back the 4-5 favorite and drew off to a driving victory in the $70,000 Fire Plug Stakes on Saturday at Laurel Park. Never menaced at any point, Digger and jockey Mike Luzzi completed the six-furlong distance in a stakes-record 1 minute, 9.13 seconds and finished 3 3/4 lengths ahead of Celtic Innis, who nipped Malibu Kid for second. Ravalo, the post-time favorite, faded to fourth. "I had to use him a little bit to get there, but he was ready today," Luzzi said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 3, 1992
You don't lose weight by buying products. You lose weight by not buying products.Diggers found a 17-million-year-old rhinoceros in Delaware, but it was extinct.Now George wants to aid Russia. He is more afraid of Dick Nixon than of Pat Buchanan.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 2, 1993
Baltimore is on a growth binge. Its murder rate is soaring ahead of the 1992 record.A federal judge ruled that foreign relations must be cleared first for environmental impact. Presumably that does not include wars.Network executives have discovered that television violence can harmful to them.University of Maryland diggers have found gold in ancient Caesarea. The university will take gold wherever it finds any.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- Sealed in a Day-Glo army-issue chemical weapons suit, Vadim Mikhailov enters a public park as nonchalantly and unhindered as if he were on a Sunday stroll.With a crowbar, he pops open a 75-pound manhole cover and drops into the dank, echoing depths of a dark tunnel for another day's work.Where Moscow's self-appointed lord of the underground emerges is likely to be a story on the evening news.Up from the sewers, utility tunnels and underground river beds, he has crashed parties through ventilation shafts at the chic Maxim's restaurant and Planet Hollywood.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 2005
DEBLOIS, Maine - Right now, Robin Brooks' basement should be full of worms - thousands of them getting ready to take a plane ride to tackle shops up and down the East Coast and then onto the pointy end of a fisherman's hook. It's peak season for fishing, but the owner of Maine Bait, a mom-and-pop business, doesn't have many bloodworms to sell, and what she does have are often small and always expensive. A dozen fat worms will set a fisherman back as much as $14, up from $4.50 just five years ago. Anglers are amazed how such a mundane creature became such a rare and pricey specimen.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
POLICE LOG* Elkridge: 6600 block of Grouse Circle: A lawn mower was stolen from a locked storage shed Thursday, police said.5800 block of Diggers Lane: A maroon 1989 Ford Tempo with Ohio tags GXW 620 was stolen Thursday morning, police said.7000 block of Ducketts Lane: A 1992 Ford Mustang stolen Thursday was found abandoned in Baltimore County the same day, police said.5800 block of Chipwood Court: A cream-colored 1986 Oldsmobile Regency with Maryland tags AMY 799 was stolen Thursday, police said.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Catching fish this summer isn't half as hard as snagging one of Maryland's top saltwater baits - the lowly bloodworm. Sought by rich international anglers, held hostage by striking worm diggers, and baked alive by an unusually brutal New England sun, bloodworms are making themselves scarce. Prices in bait-and-tackle shops have risen anywhere from three to five times in the past two months - if merchants have any to sell. Between Tuesday and Thursday, several area bait shops saw wholesale prices jump $5 for a container of 250 worms.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
"Gold Diggers of 1933," this weekend's entry in the Charles Theatre's blissfully eccentric Saturday revival series, is one of those relics from a bygone era that can't help but win your heart. Director Mervyn LeRoy and, especially, choreographer Busby Berkeley turned on all the charm they could find, employed just about every chorus girl within a 20-mile radius of Hollywood (maybe that's an exaggeration, but not by much) and managed to put out a movie that made the Depression appear exciting and, more important, winnable.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
After a century of speculation, seven years of digging in the Virginia dirt, and two false starts, archaeologists believe they have finally found traces of George Washington's boyhood home, called Ferry Farm, on the Rappahannock River near Fredericksburg. Thousands of mid-18th-century artifacts, including a broken tea set, along with the home's complex design, are providing historians with hard evidence that is enabling them to reconstruct, for the first time, the physical and economic circumstances of the first president's formative years.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 2005
DEBLOIS, Maine - Right now, Robin Brooks' basement should be full of worms - thousands of them getting ready to take a plane ride to tackle shops up and down the East Coast and then onto the pointy end of a fisherman's hook. It's peak season for fishing, but the owner of Maine Bait, a mom-and-pop business, doesn't have many bloodworms to sell, and what she does have are often small and always expensive. A dozen fat worms will set a fisherman back as much as $14, up from $4.50 just five years ago. Anglers are amazed how such a mundane creature became such a rare and pricey specimen.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 17, 2004
If some of the funniest guys in Hollywood - the Coen Brothers, Tom Hanks and Marlon Wayans - couldn't remake a hit out of the 1955 Brit comedy The Ladykillers, what prayer do the hacks who stick National Lampoon in front of their movie titles have? That would be "no prayer." If National Lampoon's Gold Diggers had a single laugh, it would die of loneliness. The comedy represents a new nadir for the Lampoon brand. John Belushi isn't hanging out in Animal House anymore and Van Wilder (2002)
NEWS
June 7, 2003
REMEMBER THE Great Outhouse Brouhaha? It broke out in the winter of 1991, when Gov. William Donald Schaefer joked, or so he claimed, with a delegate. What came off his lips was, "How's that s---house of an Eastern Shore?" The Eastern Shore erupted in protest. Some angry residents even hoisted wooden outhouses and bags of manure on their pickup trucks and headed for Annapolis, hoping to dump their loads at the governor's mansion. These days, owners of outhouses might think twice about throwing them away.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 26, 2002
QUECREEK, Pa. - Nine miners remained trapped last night along a narrow seam of coal as rescue workers sought to drill through about 250 feet of solid rock to save them from millions of gallons of water rushing in from an adjacent and long-abandoned mine. State officials said they believe one or more of the men, trapped since about 9 p.m. Wednesday, were alive as of yesterday, because rescue workers who drilled a 6-inch-wide hole and inserted an air pipe down to the miners tapped on it several times and received the same number of taps from below.
NEWS
June 7, 2003
REMEMBER THE Great Outhouse Brouhaha? It broke out in the winter of 1991, when Gov. William Donald Schaefer joked, or so he claimed, with a delegate. What came off his lips was, "How's that s---house of an Eastern Shore?" The Eastern Shore erupted in protest. Some angry residents even hoisted wooden outhouses and bags of manure on their pickup trucks and headed for Annapolis, hoping to dump their loads at the governor's mansion. These days, owners of outhouses might think twice about throwing them away.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 29, 1994
Paint.Paint itself.Paint for paint's sake.To look at the 76 de Kooning paintings gathered at the National Gallery in "Willem de Kooning: Paintings," is to begin to understand how important paint as paint was to him.Our recognition of that comes partly because we haven't been looking at paint as much as we once did. Since abstract expressionism's heyday in the 1940s and 1950s, we have gone through pop, minimalism and conceptualism -- movements for which paint,...
NEWS
By Andrew Petkofsky and Andrew Petkofsky,RICHMOND TIMES-DISPACH | July 18, 2002
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - The elegant homes and gardens of 18th-century Williamsburg might have existed in a busy and crowded landscape of barns and sheds and workyards quite unlike the sedate atmosphere of the restored historic area today. Archaeologists exploring beneath the ground on the site of a proposed parking garage just outside the historic area have found evidence that a grand home and its garden existed within the same block as a stable, brick kiln, window-making shop, saw pit and other proto-industrial facilities.
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