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By Isak Howell and Isak Howell,THE ROANOKE TIMES | September 29, 2002
WARM SPRINGS, Va. - Only two persistent sounds echoed in this quiet mountain valley on a recent day - bird song and a steady scraping noise. Over by a line of tents, where it smelled like wet grass and peanut butter sandwiches, a crew of muddy-kneed scrapers gathered and saved every speck of dirt from the open pits they dug. They were archaeologists, some professional and some novice, excavating the evidence of Virginia's pre-European history - arrowheads,...
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NEWS
By Lane Page and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
S ince they came out of the forest, our ancestors must have looked up to the skies for warm sunlight and cooling breezes. A few, looking down at natural steam vents and hot springs, found themselves able to take advantage of the earth itself for geothermal heat. Skipping to the present, when renewable energy tax credits, rebates and grants have refueled a serious interest in the underground energy source, this heat pump that uses water instead of air has taken a foothold in Howard County as a result of its long-term financial benefits, even after the demise of a local tax incentive.  Those who've gone with geothermal energy are pleased with their decisions.
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NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | October 7, 2008
Oasis [Epic] *** cds After more than a decade of worldwide fame and multiplatinum album sales, Oasis seems to still be in love with rock's celebrated past. The British pop-rock group has gotten better at refurbishing familiar melodic hooks and rhythmic riffs. Perhaps that has become the group's signature. The long shadow of the Beatles still hovers over Oasis' latest album, Dig Out Your Soul. John Lennon's voice literally haunts "I'm Outta Time," one of the set's densest cuts. But Oasis still manages to show some musical maturity - even if the new album is at times very derivative of the Fab Four post-Revolver.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The tiny brass ring bearing the initials "CC" presents a mystery: Did it belong to Charles Calvert, the third Baron Baltimore? And can the St. Mary's College of Maryland archaeologists who unearthed it ever prove its origins? The archaeologists discovered the ring this summer at a dig at a Charles County site that was a refuge for Piscataway Indians who were pushed from their homelands by other tribes and the arrival of European settlers in the 1600s. The small ring, perhaps designed to be worn on a pinkie finger, might have been a signet ring used to seal documents, said Julia King, the St. Mary's professor who oversaw the dig. King believes the ring might have been used by a representative of Charles Calvert to conduct diplomatic relations with the Piscataway tribe.
NEWS
By Doug Lamborne and Doug Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2001
SPRING IS COMING - one hopes - and it's time to play in the dirt, time to correct last year's landscaping disasters, get the crops in and cart off the kids to one of two archaeological events in the region. London Town in Edgewater starts its season of monthly Archaeology Dig Days on Saturday. The hands-on dig runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Youngsters age 8 and older are welcome, and an adult should accompany those younger than age 14. "No experience necessary," says the literature. On Thursday and Friday, a very contemporary "dig" will take place in Eastport, using a device called ground-penetrating radar.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
After 10 days of digging on shore and mucking around in the West River south of Annapolis, archaeologists say they have uncovered the remains of one of Maryland's earliest defense industries.The 42-acre Stephen Steward shipyard prospered from the 1750s until British forces sailed up in 1781 and torched the yard and the rebel warships it was building.The shipyard also was the target of a small army of amateur and professional archaeologists and divers, who wrapped up their work yesterday."An intact 18th century shipyard has not been recorded for the whole mid-Atlantic coast," said Bruce F. Thompson, assistant state underwater archaeologist, and the principal investigator at the site.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
PINTO -- For hundreds of years Indians returned to the broad, rich bottom lands along the Potomac River. They built their homes and planted their corn, beans and squash in the deep soil deposited by the river.With the arrival of Europeans in the 17th century, the native people traded for a time, acquiring glass beads and metal arrow points. Then they vanished, leaving only their trash and the faintest traces of their towns beneath the river silts.Hundreds of artifacts and clues to the lives of these earliest of Maryland's inhabitants came to light in 11 days of archaeology that ended this week at the old Indian village sites southwest of Cresaptown.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
In January 1844, the lime that was produced on the Joseph Orndorff farm southwest of Westminster was selling for 9 cents a bushel.This detail is one that will help a city government committee create an accurate exhibit of the old lime kiln and quarry off Fenby Farm Road. The exhibit, which the steering committee hopes to enhance with a restored working kiln, will be part of a planned Westminster park.Carroll County historic planner Ken Short has been digging into the kiln's history. It is one of many that dotted local quarries which produced lime in the 19th century.
FEATURES
By SUE CAMPBELL | October 14, 1990
LIKE SO MANY DAYS THIS PAST SUMMER, JULY 11 DAWNED hot and steamy; but that didn't keep passers-by from stopping and staring into the deep pits we were digging as part of an archaeology project in downtown Annapolis. Peering down, everyone wanted to know: "What did you find? Anything interesting?" They hazarded guesses and hopes: "Any gold?" "Any bones?"Kathie Hitch, a Bowie native and one of two dozen undergraduates earning University of Maryland field-study credits by working for Archaeology in Annapolis, told them about the record that she found.
NEWS
By TIM JONES and TIM JONES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 31, 2006
Where's Jimmy Hoffa? Apparently not on the grounds of a suburban Detroit horse farm. Nearly two weeks after the FBI acted on what it called the best recent tip on the whereabouts of the missing former Teamsters Union boss, agents ended a "thorough and comprehensive search" yesterday without finding any evidence of Hoffa's body. While giving up the dig of property in Milford Township, about 35 miles northwest of Detroit, Judy Chilen, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Detroit office, said she thinks Hoffa's body had been buried on the Hidden Dreams Farm, although she could offer no evidence that it had been moved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For the past 12 years, the name Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has been most associated with its outdoor productions in summer and fall, reached by trekking up a hill to the rustic ruins of Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park in Ellicott City. Audience seating typically involved folding chairs or blankets. This week, the company inaugurates a striking new home in downtown Baltimore that suggests a hip version of the famed Globe Theatre in London where Shakespeare's own company performed.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
For local archaeologists, the piece de resistance would be to find items that once belonged to Comte de Rochambeau, the French army commander during the American Revolution. He and 5,000 troops are said to have encamped at Belvoir-Scott's Plantation in Crownsville along Generals Highway, an area now being excavated by archaeologists as a partnership among the State Highway Administration, Anne Arundel County and Rockbridge Academy, the property owner. SHA officials said the highway between Interstate 97 and Annapolis has roots in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Generals Highway was originally built in the early 18th century as a second post road between Williamsburg, Va., and Philadelphia.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
Now that signs of the history of Hampstead Hill have been unearthed, historians hope to keep its 200-year-old stories from being forgotten again soon. Advocates for Patterson Park and Baltimore's legacy of the War of 1812 plan new signs and displays for artifacts uncovered in an archaeological dig completed this month, including a musket ball and gunflint dating to 1814 and a belt buckle from the Civil War. They also plan to seek inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
We appreciate your coverage of the tulip beds at Sherwood Gardens but would like to offer some clarifications ("Sherwood Gardens: Pretty as a picture," April 8). Although we encourage the public to enjoy Sherwood Gardens and its picturesque landscape, it is not a public park and is not supported by taxpayer funds. The park includes Stratford Green, originally laid out by the Olmsted Brothers for the enjoyment of the residents of Guilford, as well as adjacent land originally purchased by John Sherwood in the 1920s to accommodate his tulip hobby.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
When Samuel Smith, major general of the Maryland militia, needed a headquarters to plot Baltimore's defense from British invaders in the summer of 1814, archaeologists believe he called on the owner of a shop that gives Butcher's Hill its name. Jacob Laudenslager leased much of what is Patterson Park today from landowner William Patterson, including a butcher's shop steps from where the park's iconic pagoda sits today. Archaeologists have uncovered a wall of that structure as they embark on a dig for a better understanding of what happened when thousands of militiamen camped along the hills of southeast Baltimore during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the Pagoda, to unearth remnants of a War of 1812 camp there. The archaeologists will hold volunteer training from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. for those interested in participating in the dig, which began Wednesday and runs through May 15. They will be answering questions and showcasing findings from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | July 20, 1993
Out of the dirt of generations past come a cup handle, a glass bottle with a stick for a stopper, bone chunks and pieces of a dish that can be fit together to reveal a 19th-century china pattern.Along with lots of rocks and a few bricks, these are the first-day's take for a small group of fledgling archaeologists, digging in a hot plot of earth at Oregon Ridge Park and, subsequently, into the lives of those who lived nearby over the last 150 years.These youngsters are learning not only about archaeology and history, but also about thinking and how to do so more clearly and with more complexity.
NEWS
September 24, 1996
CHRISTIAN CHURCHES are such a dominant force in the black community that it is easy to forget that they were one of the results of the Americanization process of people of African origin. Most of the slaves who were brought here from the west coast of sub-Saharan Africa were not Christians. They came from tribes with well-developed animistic religions and believed in spirits, good and bad. Conversion to Christianity came in America.It is one of the tragedies of slavery that these ancient religious traditions have disappeared almost without a trace.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2014
Kanye West knows he is often painted as a brooding egotist, but during his Baltimore Arena concert Friday night, the 36-year-old rapper wanted fans to know he was happy. “Don't believe the pictures of me looking mad,” West told the crowd, adding he felt like he was in his living room speaking with friends.  The 15-minute rant was filled with hallmarks many have come to expect from the controversial artist: Cursing “the media,” denouncing “haters” and still, inexplicably, taking shots at “Saturday Night Live.” But, above all else, the speech - given after the night's cathartic, emotional centerpiece “Runaway” - felt more inclusive and aspirational than self-serving.
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