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Dietary Supplements

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By Los Angeles Times | October 20, 1992
Dietary supplements of the metal chromium can extend the life span of rats by more than one-third and may have similar effects in humans, a Minnesota researcher said yesterday.Biochemist Gary W. Evans of Bemidji State University in Minnesota gave a special chromium supplement to 10 rats and compared them to 20 rats that received chromium in a form less readily absorbed. After 41 months, he reported yesterday at a San Francisco meeting of the American Aging Association, 80 percent of the rats that received chromium picolinate were still alive, while all the others were dead.
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SPORTS
By Kevin VanValkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
The Ravens have not spoken to star linebacker Ray Lewis about a Yahoo Sports story linking him to a substance banned by the NFL, but team officials said Thursday they plan to. The story published this week by Yahoo Sports claims that Lewis may have acquired a supplement that contains human growth hormone. "Ray is one person that I think that we all can talk to, and he'll explain any and everything to us about what he's doing [and] why he's doing it," Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome said.
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NEWS
By Henry I. Miller | January 13, 2009
Many Americans are at risk from the combinations of prescription pills, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and foods they consume. According to a recent academic study, more than half of adults ages 57 to 85 use five or more prescription or nonprescription drugs, and about 4 percent take them in combinations that could cause dangerous interactions. Surely these health threats lurking on supermarket and drugstore shelves are addressed by federal food and drug regulation, right?
HEALTH
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Some women are coy about revealing their beauty secrets, but Dana Williams-Johnson happily concedes that she's a product junkie. Inside the Clinton townhouse she shares with her husband, her private bath overflows with health and beauty aids — hundreds in all. Think teeth whiteners and lip glosses, firming creams and false eyelashes. "I'm a girl who's been obsessed with makeup and beauty products since I was a little kid," says Williams-Johnson, 32, a webmaster for a trade association.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2002
Like scores of players in the NFL, Jonathan Ogden sought the advantage that dietary supplements could afford him. Unlike many of those players, however, the Ravens' All-Pro left tackle didn't need last year's ban of ephedrine products to persuade him to abandon them. Ogden did that on his own, giving up Ripped Fuel - his supplement of choice - once his heart began to race and after he began to feel "jumpy." "I used it for three or four years," he said, indicating its use was commonplace among Ravens players.
NEWS
By Bruce Japsen and Amanda K. Vogt and Bruce Japsen and Amanda K. Vogt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2003
Consumers looking to improve their health with dietary supplements like St. John's wort and kava may soon know whether they're getting what they pay for. Following a drastic increase in the number of reported deaths and illnesses linked to dietary supplements, the federal government proposed yesterday the first manufacturing standards for such products. The FDA does not require supplement-makers to prove that their products are safe or effective, as it does for prescription drugs, and the new rules will not change that.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
The herbal mixtures came with names like Liquid X, Schroomz and Herbal Opium, and with some heady promises: "Full of shroomy goodness," one label said. "Intensify your smoking adventures," said another. Despite the illicit-sounding names and claims, Hit Products Inc. of Riverdale in Prince George's County said its products were "dietary supplements" and not subject to government regulation. But a federal judge blocked their sale last week after determining that the herbal products should be considered unapproved new drugs, designed to mimic the effects of marijuana or Ecstasy and marketed to party-minded young adults.
SPORTS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Health advocates have been calling on the federal government for more than a year to ban dietary supplements containing ephedra alkaloids, the herbal compounds that may have played a role in the death Monday of Orioles pitching prospect Steve Bechler. "The government's failure to ban products containing ephedrine showed extraordinary political cowardice," Dr. Sidney M. Wolfe, director of the Public Citizen Health Research Group, said yesterday. "There are more reports of deaths, heart attacks, seizures and dangerous effect from these products than from all other dietary supplements combined."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1996
The federal government has issued a warning to Americans not to buy any of the Chinese herbal products being sold as "legal highs," because they can cause heart attacks, seizures, psychotic episodes or even death.The Food and Drug Administration has focused on widely available products with names like Herbal Ecstacy, Ultimate XPhoria and Cloud 9 because they contain ephedra, or ma huang. Used for centuries in China, it is the herbal form of the central nervous system stimulant ephedrine, which can act on the body like methamphetamine, commonly known as speed.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a controversial decision, the Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that manufacturers must have scientific proof of the benefits of dietary supplements -- vitamins, minerals, amino acids and other nutritional substances -- before they can make health claims on product labels.The decision holds the dietary supplement industry to the same standards the agency set for health claims about food.The new rules, which are subject to public comment before they become final in 60 days, mean that scientific experts must agree about the value of a supplement before the manufacturer may place the information on a label.
NEWS
By Henry I. Miller | January 13, 2009
Many Americans are at risk from the combinations of prescription pills, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and foods they consume. According to a recent academic study, more than half of adults ages 57 to 85 use five or more prescription or nonprescription drugs, and about 4 percent take them in combinations that could cause dangerous interactions. Surely these health threats lurking on supermarket and drugstore shelves are addressed by federal food and drug regulation, right?
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2006
The nation's soaring obesity rates won't fall until Americans stop placing their faith in unproven and possibly fraudulent weight-loss products and treatments. That's the message from some of the nation's top obesity experts, commenting on new data about Americans' continued, naive hope for the quick fix. Part of the problem, they say, is consumers' misconceptions about safety laws. A national survey released last month at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society found that 60 percent of Americans believe incorrectly that over-the-counter dietary supplements for weight loss must be tested and proven to be safe and effective.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2006
I run several miles a few times each week, and I work out with weights. I've had a little trouble with achy joints lately. A friend of mine takes glucosamine and suggested I take it as well. Have you ever heard of it? The dietary supplement glucosamine has been grabbing headlines in the news lately, in part because it's so popular. Many runners and athletes take glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate because they say it helps their joints. The National Arthritis Foundation urges members to ask their doctors about the dietary supplements because the group has interpreted recent studies to show them to be helpful in cases of moderate- to severe pain.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
A clinical trial of the popular dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin found no evidence that they're better than placebos in easing arthritic knee pain, the study's lead investigator said yesterday. The good news: Like placebos, they aren't harmful, either. The government-sponsored trial involving 1,600 arthritis sufferers at 16 medical centers across the country was designed to see whether the supplements lived up to their billing as potent weapons against arthritis. Sales of the two supplements topped $700 million in 2004, according to the Nutrition Business Journal.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
A U.S. District judge has ruled that the Food and Drug Administration went too far by banning all products that contain the dietary supplement ephedra. The ruling, signed Wednesday by Judge Tena Campbell in Utah, undercut the FDA's latest foray into regulating dietary supplements - products containing natural ingredients classified under the law as more like food than drugs. Although the court provided what experts said was a clear rebuke to the agency, the immediate effect is likely to be minimal.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Alternative therapies ranging from Chinese herbs to high-dose vitamins and dietary supplements should be more rigorously tested to ensure that they're safe and actually work, a national panel of experts said yesterday. With more than a third of Americans reporting that they try alternative treatments, a panel convened by the Institute of Medicine said the remedies should be held to the same standards as conventional therapies. The group, however, did not report that many people are being harmed by the products.
HEALTH
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Some women are coy about revealing their beauty secrets, but Dana Williams-Johnson happily concedes that she's a product junkie. Inside the Clinton townhouse she shares with her husband, her private bath overflows with health and beauty aids — hundreds in all. Think teeth whiteners and lip glosses, firming creams and false eyelashes. "I'm a girl who's been obsessed with makeup and beauty products since I was a little kid," says Williams-Johnson, 32, a webmaster for a trade association.
NEWS
May 9, 1995
RECENTLY we came across Delia Ephron's instructions on eating like a child, which appeared many years ago in the New York Times:"Spinach: divide into little piles. Re-arrange again into new piles. After five or six maneuvers, sit back and say you are full."Chocolate-chip cookies: half-sit, half-lie on the bed, propped up by a pillow. Read a book. Place cookies next to you on the sheet so that crumbs get in the bed. As you eat the cookies, remove each chocolate chip and place it on your stomach.
NEWS
By Jane Allen and Jane Allen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2004
For years, Joan Rozen lived on Excedrin pills, too busy as a mother and teacher to bow to daily migraine headaches. "Sometimes, they would get so intense I would get nauseated, but I just had to keep going," said Rozen, 60, of Binghamton, N.Y. A couple of years ago, her son Todd, a neurologist, suggested that coenzyme Q10, a dietary supplement he had studied for migraine prevention, might break her dependence on the aspirin-based pills. She began taking 150 milligrams daily and was told the medication could take a few months to work.
NEWS
By Beth Daley and Beth Daley,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2004
It was a dreaded ritual for generations of children: a dose of cod-liver oil, an amber and vile-tasting cure meant to ward off everything from bone disease to ear infections. Now, after decades of being relegated to Grandma's medicine cabinet, fish oil is back in vogue. Fueled by health-conscious consumers looking for a quick boost of omega-3 fatty acids, U.S. fish oil supplement sales have almost tripled since 1997 to more than $131 million. They're among the fastest growing supplements in the country, according to Nutrition Business Journal, a research and marketing company.
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