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By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 1996
The recent release of the "1995 Dietary Guidelines for Americans" brought no big surprises, but it does offer some powerful information.Published in a 40-page booklet, the guidelines "are a road map, a handy tool, a quick check list" to seeing how you're doing nutritionally, according to Edith Hogan, spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. "These guidelines demonstrate that science is evolutionary, not revolutionary."Eat a variety of foods, choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol, choose a diet with plenty of grain products, vegetables and fruits, and moderate in salt and sugar are messages we've grown accustomed to. "What is new," she says, "is that exercise is included as part of the dietary guidelines for the first time."
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EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
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FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | November 6, 1990
At first glance, the 1990 revision of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans seems simply to give a positive twist to an old message.But the text reveals a dramatic change in determining and achieving appropriate weight."
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Last Sunday, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern ("Liberal icon fought Nixon, Vietnam War," Oct. 22). Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, Senator McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines.
NEWS
February 6, 2011
We have weathered the food pyramid, the fascination with oat bran and the embrace of low-fat fare. Now, as is its habit, the federal government is giving us more advice on what to eat. A fresh set of federal dietary guidelines, a five-year update issued by the departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, were announced last week. Happily, there seemed to be less nagging in this go-round than in prior years. Indeed, the phrase "enjoy your food" was part of the government 's message.
NEWS
December 27, 2004
Dr. Sheldon Margen , 85, a pioneer in nutritional science whose research was a foundation for dietary guidelines now listed on packaged food in the United States, died of cancer Dec. 18 in Berkeley, Calif. He co-founded the University of California, Berkeley "Wellness Letter," one of the first newsletters of its kind. He helped to establish the minimum daily requirements of protein, trace minerals and other components of a healthful adult diet.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Last Sunday, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern ("Liberal icon fought Nixon, Vietnam War," Oct. 22). Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, Senator McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Rachel Ernzen weighs in on bad habits. Information about the relationship between food and health abounds in newspapers, magazines, books, TV and Internet. Foods have become more readily available and portion sizes have grown, but we lead more sedentary daily lives.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2004
Americans should cut their salt intake to roughly a teaspoon a day, exercise at least 30 minutes most days and eat two fish meals each week to bulk up on omega-3 fatty acids. Such is a sampling of recommendations for healthy living from the federal Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee after a yearlong review of the science surrounding food and human health. The government, which released the panel's report yesterday, will use the recommendations to reshape the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Rachel Ernzen weighs in on bad habits. Information about the relationship between food and health abounds in newspapers, magazines, books, TV and Internet. Foods have become more readily available and portion sizes have grown, but we lead more sedentary daily lives.
NEWS
February 6, 2011
We have weathered the food pyramid, the fascination with oat bran and the embrace of low-fat fare. Now, as is its habit, the federal government is giving us more advice on what to eat. A fresh set of federal dietary guidelines, a five-year update issued by the departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, were announced last week. Happily, there seemed to be less nagging in this go-round than in prior years. Indeed, the phrase "enjoy your food" was part of the government 's message.
NEWS
By Scott Kahan | May 1, 2007
A long-running contradiction in U.S. farm policy is fattening the waistlines of Americans and the profits of agribusiness at the same time. For the 30 years that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been issuing dietary guidelines, there has been a stark inconsistency between the federal government's advice and its food funding. True, the USDA has been doing more, over time, to promote health through dietary guidelines, food pyramids and other nutrition programs. And yet more than $20 billion yearly - more than one-fifth its budget - is sunk into a farm bill that supports many of the foods its recommendations warn against.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN, [SUN REPORTER ] | October 7, 2005
You're shopping for health in a hurry, and the supermarket aisles seem more than ready to accommodate. You grab multigrain crackers, 12-grain bread that says it's "made with whole grains," a package of "oat bran" muffins and "100 percent wheat" bagels. You'll have no problem meeting the government's latest recommendation of three servings of whole grains a day, right? Guess again. There's a good chance that none of the items in your basket provides much in the way of whole grains. Meanwhile, some familiar whole-grain foods you may have passed by -- wild rice, oatmeal and even popcorn -- often aren't advertised as such.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
One food pyramid wasn't enough to fight the nation's battle against the bulge, so government officials are hoping 12 new pyramids and an interactive Web site will finally help Americans choose a more healthful diet. Unveiled yesterday, the new pyramids have been flipped on their side - with food distribution running vertically instead of horizontally - and with an added staircase to emphasize the need to exercise. The old pyramid's images of broccoli, steak and breads are gone. So are the recommended numbers of servings, as well as the blocks of food groups.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Two pieces of news yesterday about the health benefits of DHA may benefit Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia company whose production of the omega-3 fatty acid has been a major force in the market for baby formula. A small-scale study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and released yesterday, showed that DHA could help prevent children with high cholesterol from developing heart disease. Meanwhile, new dietary guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture also released yesterday claimed that DHA, which is found in shellfish and fish, may also help prevent cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
November 30, 1993
Too much fat. Too much sodium. Too few fruits and vegetables. Not enough of certain vitamins.Sounds like a meal at the local pit beef stand, doesn't it? Unfortunately, the above description is taken from a U.S. Department of Agriculture report on school lunches nationwide.The study released last month found levels of fat and sodium in school cafeteria fare that far exceed the government's dietary guidelines. In another recent study of children's eating habits, the consumer advocacy group Public Voice for Food and Health Policy said 57 percent of youngsters ages 6 to 11 eat less than one serving of fruit daily, and 32 percent eat less than a serving of vegetables a day.The federal government has too long ignored or pooh-poohed these bad habits.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Before you eat that third slice of bacon for breakfast, a cheeseburger for lunch and kung pao chicken for dinner, just think: That's 45 calories per slice of bacon, 609 calories for the cheeseburger and a whopping 1,620 for kung pao - way over the average calorie allowance recommended per day for most people under revised dietary guidelines issued yesterday by the federal government. And you haven't even counted the eggs, fries and mocha latte that perhaps rounded out your day's intake and your figure.
NEWS
December 27, 2004
Dr. Sheldon Margen , 85, a pioneer in nutritional science whose research was a foundation for dietary guidelines now listed on packaged food in the United States, died of cancer Dec. 18 in Berkeley, Calif. He co-founded the University of California, Berkeley "Wellness Letter," one of the first newsletters of its kind. He helped to establish the minimum daily requirements of protein, trace minerals and other components of a healthful adult diet.
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