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Diet Soda

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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2005
WHEN consumers tasted Diet Rite cola in 1958, and many puckered up at the bitter aftertaste, it began a half-century quest - still continuing - to produce a diet soda that didn't taste like one. America since has landed a man on the moon, corralled the laser for medical use and developed the World Wide Web. But formulating the perfect diet soda is still a work in progress - the latest effort being the Coca-Cola Co.'s launch of Coca-Cola Zero. Diet brands are the fastest-growing segment of the soda market.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 31, 2012
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg proposed this week a first-of-its-kind ban on the sale of large-sized sodas and other sugary beverages at restaurants and other outlets, but don't look to Baltimore to immediately follow suit. Though studies say such restrictions, as well as higher prices and education, can curb consumption, some local leaders plan to let New York be the test lab for now. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakewill remain focused on a controversial plan to increase the tax from 2 to 5 cents on sugary drinks and alcohol.
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FEATURES
February 21, 2008
Metabolic syndrome Diet soda tied to health risks Researchers have found a correlation between drinking diet soda and metabolic syndrome and elevated blood pressure. The syndrome is the collection of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes that include abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and blood glucose levels. The scientists gathered dietary information on more than 9,500 men and women ages 45 to 64. Overall, a Western dietary pattern - high intakes of refined grains, fried foods and red meat - was associated with an 18 percent increased risk for metabolic syndrome, while a "prudent" diet dominated by fruits, vegetables, fish and poultry correlated with neither an increased nor a decreased risk.
FEATURES
By Bailey Shiffler and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Whether you're counting calories, tallying points, cutting carbohydrates or sweating it out at the gym, dieting is a tough road to navigate. What's even worse is when you sabatoge your own efforts by making some classic diet-busting mistakes you might not even be aware of. Here are seven behaviors that may cause you to fall off that I-wanna-lose-weight wagon — and advice from experts on how to stay on it. The diet-buster: Drinking too...
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 4, 1993
Paul Rudnick, proud owner of two new Outer Critics Circle awards for his AIDS-inspired off-Broadway hit "Jeffrey," describes the kind of character that moved him to mock the dread plague:"Oh, you brought the wrong diet soda," he whines, mimicking a hospital martyr milking a bedside vigil to the max. "Not that robe -- that's the ugly robe . . . I've read these magazines."With "Jeffrey," Mr. Rudnick has made a fatal disease hilarious; he has accentuated the positive in HIV-positive; he has satirized the saturnalians who cruise the clubs, the gyms and even the memorial services of the dead.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2007
Dr. Ramachandran Vasan and colleagues pored over the health records of thousands of patients and deduced this: People of middle age who drank as little as one soda a day - diet or regular - had at least a 40 percent greater chance of developing risk factors for heart disease than abstainers. Vasan had expected a link between heart health risk and sugar-sweetened, high-calorie drinks. But the diet soda findings puzzled him. So the researchers called for more study when they published their findings yesterday in Circulation, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.
NEWS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | January 14, 2007
CHICAGO -- It's not unusual for Dee McKinsey to have three cans of Coke before she leaves the house each morning for her job as the regional director of boards and volunteerism at the American Cancer Society in Chicago. "There is nothing better than the feel of Coke on the back of your throat in the morning," said McKinsey, a morning soda drinker since the 1970s. These days, more people are enjoying that chilled morning jolt as they increasingly turn to soft drinks instead of coffee, flouting mom's no soda for breakfast rule many had in their youth.
NEWS
July 26, 2004
NATIONAL Democrats target undecideds Democrats will convene in Boston today with a singular aim: to introduce their nominee, Sen. John Kerry, to the country's undecided voters. Polls show Kerry and President Bush in a virtual dead heat. [Page 1a] Clintons at center stage in Boston When Bill and Hillary Clinton appear in prime time tonight at Boston's Fleet Center, they will bask in the adulation of a party that still considers them its biggest superstars and nurtures hopes of one day seeing them in the White House again.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 17, 1994
A recent report on ABC's "Day One" showed that nicotine, the addictive substance in cigarettes, is not simply an unfortunate byproduct of tobacco. Rather, cigarette companies actually control the amount of nicotine in each cigarette. By increasing the dose just a bit, they can turn the screws on the helpless smoker -- increasing his fix and his need for another one.I can't prove it, but I know the folks who make Diet Coke are doing the same thing to me.Diet Coke is not just a harmless bit of effervescence to help spark my taste buds and my day. There is caffeine in there.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | May 31, 2012
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg proposed this week a first-of-its-kind ban on the sale of large-sized sodas and other sugary beverages at restaurants and other outlets, but don't look to Baltimore to immediately follow suit. Though studies say such restrictions, as well as higher prices and education, can curb consumption, some local leaders plan to let New York be the test lab for now. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blakewill remain focused on a controversial plan to increase the tax from 2 to 5 cents on sugary drinks and alcohol.
FEATURES
February 21, 2008
Metabolic syndrome Diet soda tied to health risks Researchers have found a correlation between drinking diet soda and metabolic syndrome and elevated blood pressure. The syndrome is the collection of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes that include abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and blood glucose levels. The scientists gathered dietary information on more than 9,500 men and women ages 45 to 64. Overall, a Western dietary pattern - high intakes of refined grains, fried foods and red meat - was associated with an 18 percent increased risk for metabolic syndrome, while a "prudent" diet dominated by fruits, vegetables, fish and poultry correlated with neither an increased nor a decreased risk.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2007
Dr. Ramachandran Vasan and colleagues pored over the health records of thousands of patients and deduced this: People of middle age who drank as little as one soda a day - diet or regular - had at least a 40 percent greater chance of developing risk factors for heart disease than abstainers. Vasan had expected a link between heart health risk and sugar-sweetened, high-calorie drinks. But the diet soda findings puzzled him. So the researchers called for more study when they published their findings yesterday in Circulation, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.
NEWS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,Chicago Tribune | January 14, 2007
CHICAGO -- It's not unusual for Dee McKinsey to have three cans of Coke before she leaves the house each morning for her job as the regional director of boards and volunteerism at the American Cancer Society in Chicago. "There is nothing better than the feel of Coke on the back of your throat in the morning," said McKinsey, a morning soda drinker since the 1970s. These days, more people are enjoying that chilled morning jolt as they increasingly turn to soft drinks instead of coffee, flouting mom's no soda for breakfast rule many had in their youth.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2005
WHEN consumers tasted Diet Rite cola in 1958, and many puckered up at the bitter aftertaste, it began a half-century quest - still continuing - to produce a diet soda that didn't taste like one. America since has landed a man on the moon, corralled the laser for medical use and developed the World Wide Web. But formulating the perfect diet soda is still a work in progress - the latest effort being the Coca-Cola Co.'s launch of Coca-Cola Zero. Diet brands are the fastest-growing segment of the soda market.
NEWS
July 26, 2004
NATIONAL Democrats target undecideds Democrats will convene in Boston today with a singular aim: to introduce their nominee, Sen. John Kerry, to the country's undecided voters. Polls show Kerry and President Bush in a virtual dead heat. [Page 1a] Clintons at center stage in Boston When Bill and Hillary Clinton appear in prime time tonight at Boston's Fleet Center, they will bask in the adulation of a party that still considers them its biggest superstars and nurtures hopes of one day seeing them in the White House again.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 17, 1994
A recent report on ABC's "Day One" showed that nicotine, the addictive substance in cigarettes, is not simply an unfortunate byproduct of tobacco. Rather, cigarette companies actually control the amount of nicotine in each cigarette. By increasing the dose just a bit, they can turn the screws on the helpless smoker -- increasing his fix and his need for another one.I can't prove it, but I know the folks who make Diet Coke are doing the same thing to me.Diet Coke is not just a harmless bit of effervescence to help spark my taste buds and my day. There is caffeine in there.
FEATURES
By Bailey Shiffler and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Whether you're counting calories, tallying points, cutting carbohydrates or sweating it out at the gym, dieting is a tough road to navigate. What's even worse is when you sabatoge your own efforts by making some classic diet-busting mistakes you might not even be aware of. Here are seven behaviors that may cause you to fall off that I-wanna-lose-weight wagon — and advice from experts on how to stay on it. The diet-buster: Drinking too...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 25, 2004
MILWAUKEE - Drinking too many sodas causes women to gain weight and doubles their risk for Type 2 diabetes, a new large study shows. However, experts say that while soda is not good in huge quantities, it's not the drink but rather the calories in the drink that's the main culprit. In the study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers analyzed dietary and weight information from more than 51,000 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study II. Researchers analyzed women's dietary and weight information from 1991, 1995 and 1999.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 4, 1993
Paul Rudnick, proud owner of two new Outer Critics Circle awards for his AIDS-inspired off-Broadway hit "Jeffrey," describes the kind of character that moved him to mock the dread plague:"Oh, you brought the wrong diet soda," he whines, mimicking a hospital martyr milking a bedside vigil to the max. "Not that robe -- that's the ugly robe . . . I've read these magazines."With "Jeffrey," Mr. Rudnick has made a fatal disease hilarious; he has accentuated the positive in HIV-positive; he has satirized the saturnalians who cruise the clubs, the gyms and even the memorial services of the dead.
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