Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDiet
IN THE NEWS

Diet

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Benjamin H. Passey, assistant professor in the Johns Hopkins University's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Nature of Research : Passey was part of an international team that analyzed the diet of Australopithecus sediba , a human-like primate that lived 2 million to 3 million years ago in what is now South Africa. Researchers used a laser to vaporize bits of fossilized tooth enamel from two individuals that had been recovered. Using mass spectrometry, they detected in the vapor the chemical fingerprints of the foods consumed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
At age 23, Malarie Burgess couldn't fit into restaurant booths, she had to buy clothes online, and she endured stares and comments from strangers, particularly children. The year was 2010, and she weighed 350 pounds. "I had kind of fooled myself into thinking I was OK," recalled Burgess, who grew up in Westminster. But then a family friend sat her down and urged her to change. "She said she was worried about my health," Burgess said of the friend. "Initially, I was very offended.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 15, 1992
Worried legislators in Annapolis have decided it is time for them to go on a diet -- at least temporarily. No more pork, their leaders have decreed. It looks bad to dip into the barrel for $15 million in pet projects when Maryland is suffering through a prolonged recession and the state budget is being slashed by $1 billion.Instead, the bond money will be used for school construction and other munificent causes. Putting legislators on this low-pork diet (a little lard will still be left) is seen as a sure-fire way to win public applause and convince citizens the General Assembly is reforming itself.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2014
Baltimore has joined with other major U.S. cities in defending the federal government's authority to impose a "pollution diet" on the Chesapeake Bay. New York City, with sign-ons from Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and San Francisco, filed a "friend-of-the-court" brief Monday in federal appeals court in a case challenging the Environmental Protection Agency 's imposition of bay cleanup goals on Maryland and the other five states...
NEWS
June 25, 1991
America's preoccupation with fitness has produced some jarring contradictions -- light cheesecake and light beef, diet ice cream and low-calorie Twinkies. So it probably could have been expected: Taylor California Cellars is now marketing a diet Chablis, which has 50 percent fewer calories than the real stuff, and 70 percent less alcohol.The new wine is supposed to appeal to men and women who don't usually drink alcohol but are a tad uncomfortable ordering a diet Coke with scampi. But it will, undoubtedly, be a smash hit among joggers and fiber-eaters as well.
FEATURES
November 6, 1990
As the holidays approach, there are taste temptations all around us. Americans often gain weight during November and December, only to go on a weight-loss program after New Year's Day.The Evening Sun would like to know, first, whether you believe you are overweight, underweight or at the perfect weight.Secondly, we'd like to know if you have been on a diet any time during 1990.Finally, we'd like to know if you plan to go on a diet after the holidays.To register your opinions, call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's free directory of telephone information services at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | January 18, 2012
Paula Deen has long bragged about her unhealthy cooking, but now the southern chef has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes . While she said she is not changing her diet, her diagnosis could be a wake up call to people still clinging to fatty, sugar-filled diets. Deen said she has always eaten in moderation, but while Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary it is also diet related. Deen made her announcement while at the same time saying she was promoting a diabetes drug.
NEWS
By Nancy Heneson | September 16, 1993
I LEARNED from a recent Consumer Reports article on dieting that the American Tobacco Co. introduced this slogan in 1928: "Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet."That really got me thinking. You see, I work in the field of weight management, which has gotten a very bad name indeed. People are even saying that diets don't work. Imagine that, in this age of preoccupation with all things bodily. Diets do work, if you really want them to.The problem lies in a well-intentioned cover-up by physicians, nutritionists and other sages of the health professions, who refuse to incorporate into their balanced and reasonable recommendations one crucial fact: The brain, not the stomach, is what gets people into trouble over food.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | January 15, 1991
Q: Just after delivery of my second child, my doctor said I had a borderline iron deficiency. What kind of diet would improve my intake of iron?A: The choice of a diet to prevent or overcome iron deficiency is tricky because it depends both on the amount and form of the iron in your foods as well as other dietary factors.The two major forms of dietary iron are heme and nonheme iron. Heme iron, which comes from the muscle protein (myoglobin) found in meat, poultry and fish, comprises about half the iron in these animal products and is absorbed much better than nonheme iron.
NEWS
By JOE MURRAY | January 18, 1995
Angelina County, Texas. -- Like most everybody else, I've started the New Year with a new diet. I call it the ''Two Don't Diet.''Just two things to remember:* Don't eat anything after 3:30 p.m.* Don't go to bed before midnight.This comes from L.M. Boyd, the Cliff Clavin of journalism. Mr. Boyd's daily column of little-known facts is syndicated in newspapers throughout the known world. I depend of him for most of my news and all of my philosophy. For instance:Item: ''Police say traffic accidents go up about 10 percent during the first week we turn our clocks ahead -- spring forward.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 5, 2014
Most people lose weight during the week and gain weight on the weekends, a new study finds. Yet, researchers say it's the weekday diets that are most important for maintaining a healthy weight. The researchers at Cornell University looked at people's diets over seven days and found rhythm of losing and gaining. But they also found that those who lose the most during the week are more likely to either lose weight or maintain weight over time. “Weight variations between weekdays and weekends should be considered normal instead of weight gain,” said Cornell University behavioral economist Brian Wansink in a statement.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 8, 2014
If you are looking to drop pounds, the DASH diet is probably your best choice and Paleo your worst, according to rankings by U.S. News and World Report. The magazine lauded the DASH diet, which was created to fight hypertension, as being easy to follow and safe and nutritious. The Paleo diet says people should eat like cavemen with meals that include very pure meats and wild plants. Sounds good on paper, experts hired by U.S. News & World Report said, but the diet is hard to follow.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Dr. John M. Freeman, an internationally renowned Johns Hopkins pediatric neurologist and expert in pediatric epilepsy who had also been a medical ethicist, died Friday of cardiovascular disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Ruxton resident was 80. "Few Hopkins physicians have had a more profound effect than John Freeman on how we treat young patients who suffer from epilepsy and congenital abnormalities - and how we address the often-difficult ethical issues surrounding these potentially heart-breaking cases," said Ronald R. Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
FEATURES
October 30, 2013
Q: How do I know if I need to put my child on a weight-loss diet? What is appropriate for a 9-year-old? A: Interestingly, 20 years ago, there was little interest in weight loss in a 9-year-old child. It was assumed that this was the “husky” age and that he would slim down with the impending start of pubertal height gain. We have regrettably learned that is too often a false assumption. You begin with a visit to your health care provider to document the true weight, weight percentile, height percentile and the Basal Metabolic Index (BMI)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
Mother and daughter Angela and Candi Watts were both diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. After a two-year battle, they are both disease-free, but the war continues. The new enemy is their waistlines. Scientists have discovered that excess weight not only raises the risks of getting cancer but the chances that cancer will return. Now, as medical studies seek to determine how much weight loss is needed for a better prognosis - and whether the fat-cancer link can be disrupted in other ways - patients are being encouraged to slim down.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
Despite evidence presented last year by the National Institutes of Health that as much as 97 percent of the people who diet to lose weight are destined to fail, the idea of looking slimmer and feeling leaner has powerful appeal to those whose waistbands' grasp has exceeded their reach.Somewhere out there, folks reason, there is a diet that works, and works for a lifetime."Somewhere" may very well be between the covers of Dean Ornish's latest book, "Eat More, Weigh Less" (HarperCollins, $22.)
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | May 31, 1992
I have to write this really fast because tomorrow I've got to show up at a friend's swimming pool.In a swimsuit.Which means I have only one day left to accomplish my goal of losing 10 pounds before appearing -- in broad daylight -- in clothing that resembles underwear.The good news is I had the foresight to start my diet two weeks ago. The bad news is I still have 9 1/2 pounds to lose.I'm not sure why it's taking so long. Perhaps a quick look at my diet notebook will offer some clues.Day One: Weigh myself on bathroom scale.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2013
Farming and building groups are appealing a federal judge's ruling recently that upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's " pollution diet " for the Chesapeake Bay. Lawyers for the American Farm Bureau Federation , the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, and other groups representing fertilizer manufacturers, pork, poultry and corn growers and home builders filed a notice of appeal Monday in federal district court in Harrisburg, Pa. U.S....
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A federal judge on Friday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's right to impose a pollution "diet" for the Chesapeake Bay, rejecting a legal challenge to the restoration effort from farmers' and builders' groups. U.S. District Judge Sylvia H. Rambo ruled that the EPA did not overstep its legal authority in requiring Maryland and the other five states in the bay watershed to accelerate their efforts to reduce pollution fouling the estuary. Rambo also found that the EPA had not relied on bad science in setting the new cleanup targets, nor had it denied the public a chance to provide input.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.