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NEWS
June 19, 1995
George M. Stafford, 80, a Kansas Republican who was chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission from 1970 to 1977, died of kidney failure Friday at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He lived in Bethesda.Rabbi Shaul Israeli, 85, a leader of the religious Zionist movement and an opponent of the Israeli-Palestinian peace accord, died Saturday in Jerusalem. Rabbi Israeli was the first rabbi of Kfar Haroeh, a settlement at the heart of the Zionist movement before the state of Israel was established in 1948.
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NEWS
February 5, 2004
Eleanor Holm Whalen, 91, a two-time swimming gold medalist in the 1932 Olympics who was kicked off the 1936 U.S. team after she was caught drinking champagne and shooting dice on the ocean liner en route to Europe, died of kidney failure Saturday in Miami. After the 1936 games, she starred in Billy Rose's "Aquacades," a traveling show. In 1938, she played Jane in Tarzan's Revenge, with Glenn Morris, the 1936 Olympic decathlon champion, in the starring role. In 1940, she married Mr. Rose, who later was a Broadway producer.
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NEWS
November 26, 1997
Joanna Cook Moore, 63, an actress who had roles in several Alfred Hitchcock television shows and was the mother of Oscar-winning actress Tatum O'Neal, died Saturday in Indian Wells, Calif.Robert Lewis, 88, an actor, director and acting coach whose star pupils included Marlon Brando, Meryl Streep and Faye Dunaway, died Sunday in New York.Nate Landsberg, 83, the Los Angeles Police Department's oldest active reserve officer, died of kidney cancer Monday in CulverCity, Calif.Onzy D. Matthews, 67, a noted jazz and big-band arranger who worked with Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and other musical greats, died in Dallas of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
January 23, 2001
Norris Turney, 79, a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist and flutist who played in the last incarnation of Duke Ellington's orchestra, died of kidney failure Wednesday in Kettering, Ohio. Elizabeth Sewell, 81, a poet, critic and novelist, died Jan. 12 in Greensboro, N.C. She was the author of five books of criticism, including "The Orphic Voice," about the role of the imagination in literature and science. C. Malcolm Watkins, 89, a museum curator and collector of everyday objects, died Jan. 12 in Leesburg, Va. He spent 31 years of his career at the Smithsonian Institution, where he developed the first large exhibition hall devoted to everyday life in early America.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
Eleanor Holm Whalen, 91, a two-time swimming gold medalist in the 1932 Olympics who was kicked off the 1936 U.S. team after she was caught drinking champagne and shooting dice on the ocean liner en route to Europe, died of kidney failure Saturday in Miami. After the 1936 games, she starred in Billy Rose's "Aquacades," a traveling show. In 1938, she played Jane in Tarzan's Revenge, with Glenn Morris, the 1936 Olympic decathlon champion, in the starring role. In 1940, she married Mr. Rose, who later was a Broadway producer.
NEWS
June 18, 1997
Richard Jaeckel,70, an actor best known for playing tough guys in films such as "The Dirty Dozen" and "Sands of Iwo Jima," died Saturday in Los Angeles.Pulled from a studio mailroom as a teen-ager, Mr. Jaeckel became one of Hollywood's most durable character actors, playing soldiers, gangsters, police officers and astronauts in 54 years before the camera.In 1971, he was nominated for a best-supporting-actor Oscar for his work in "Sometimes a Great Notion," directed by Paul Newman and starring Newman and Henry Fonda.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
Walter Landor, 81, founder of the design firm that gave the corporate world logos for Coca-Cola, General Electric, Shell Oil and other industry giants, died Friday in San Francisco. The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History completed a collection of his designs and packaging last year.Charles K. Cooper, 82, a newspaper publisher who put out his first paper from his basement nearly 50 years ago, died Thursday of a gastric hemorrhage in Greensburg, Pa. He began the Penn-Franklin News in Level Green in 1947, using a $75 insurance policy as capital.
NEWS
November 30, 1994
James Whitney Cook, 90, former chairman of Illinois Bell Telephone Co. and president of the National Basketball Association's Chicago Bulls, died Sunday in Naples, Fla.Porter Henderson Gilbert, 72, a former lawyer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration who took part in the procurement phase of the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab and space shuttle programs, died Friday in Dayton, Ohio.Nora Hampton, 82, a former reporter for the Oakland Tribune who was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for her firsthand account of being hijacked, died Friday in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
Elizabeth Holdridge Dos Passos,89, who worked to preserve the writings and art of her husband, novelist John Dos Passos, died Sunday in Warsaw, Va. She was instrumental in having her husband recognized as a painter and historian as well as a novelist from the post-World War I "Lost Generation" of writers and expatriates in Europe.Elias Freij,80, the mayor of Bethlehem for 25 years and a confidant of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, died of kidney and heart failure Sunday in Amman, Jordan.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
Mario A. Zacchini, 87, a human cannonball who had thrilled crowds worldwide by catapulting over fairgrounds at speeds up to 100 mph, died of kidney failure Jan. 28 in Tampa, Fla.He survived about 5,000 cannon shots -- by his estimate -- and a couple of missed nets. He was the last survivor of five brothers who thrilled crowds in the 1920s, '30s and '40s. His flying days came to a close after an accident at the World's Fair in New York in 1940.Nicholas Krushenick, 70, a New York painter whose bold, poster-like paintings were called abstract pop, died Friday at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
Mario A. Zacchini, 87, a human cannonball who had thrilled crowds worldwide by catapulting over fairgrounds at speeds up to 100 mph, died of kidney failure Jan. 28 in Tampa, Fla.He survived about 5,000 cannon shots -- by his estimate -- and a couple of missed nets. He was the last survivor of five brothers who thrilled crowds in the 1920s, '30s and '40s. His flying days came to a close after an accident at the World's Fair in New York in 1940.Nicholas Krushenick, 70, a New York painter whose bold, poster-like paintings were called abstract pop, died Friday at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
Elizabeth Holdridge Dos Passos,89, who worked to preserve the writings and art of her husband, novelist John Dos Passos, died Sunday in Warsaw, Va. She was instrumental in having her husband recognized as a painter and historian as well as a novelist from the post-World War I "Lost Generation" of writers and expatriates in Europe.Elias Freij,80, the mayor of Bethlehem for 25 years and a confidant of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, died of kidney and heart failure Sunday in Amman, Jordan.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
Joanna Cook Moore, 63, an actress who had roles in several Alfred Hitchcock television shows and was the mother of Oscar-winning actress Tatum O'Neal, died Saturday in Indian Wells, Calif.Robert Lewis, 88, an actor, director and acting coach whose star pupils included Marlon Brando, Meryl Streep and Faye Dunaway, died Sunday in New York.Nate Landsberg, 83, the Los Angeles Police Department's oldest active reserve officer, died of kidney cancer Monday in CulverCity, Calif.Onzy D. Matthews, 67, a noted jazz and big-band arranger who worked with Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and other musical greats, died in Dallas of cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
September 24, 1997
Ernest J. Parham,93, whose testimony 71 years after a massacre of blacks in Rosewood, Fla., helped survivors collect compensation, died of a stroke Saturday in Orlando, Fla.Mr. Parham was a witness to five days of violence that wiped out the black community in northern Florida in 1923. As an 18-year-old, he stumbled across a white mob stringing a black man, Sam Carter, from a tree in an attempt to gain information about the alleged rape of a white woman.Someone in the mob shot and killed Mr. Carter, triggering the violence that destroyed the community of about 120 people.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
Kim Casali,55, an artist whose syndicated "Love Is" cartoons grew out of drawings on letters and notes to her husband, died Sunday in London. The cause of death was not released.Aaron "Red" Doff,76, a Hollywood publicist, talent agent and producer who represented Mickey Rooney, Frankie Laine, Liberace and Doris Day, died of a lung disorder June 13 in Los Angeles.Joseph Grunwald,76, an economist and former State Department official who was founding president of the Institute of the Americas, died of kidney cancer Wednesday in San Diego.
NEWS
June 18, 1997
Richard Jaeckel,70, an actor best known for playing tough guys in films such as "The Dirty Dozen" and "Sands of Iwo Jima," died Saturday in Los Angeles.Pulled from a studio mailroom as a teen-ager, Mr. Jaeckel became one of Hollywood's most durable character actors, playing soldiers, gangsters, police officers and astronauts in 54 years before the camera.In 1971, he was nominated for a best-supporting-actor Oscar for his work in "Sometimes a Great Notion," directed by Paul Newman and starring Newman and Henry Fonda.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
Kim Casali,55, an artist whose syndicated "Love Is" cartoons grew out of drawings on letters and notes to her husband, died Sunday in London. The cause of death was not released.Aaron "Red" Doff,76, a Hollywood publicist, talent agent and producer who represented Mickey Rooney, Frankie Laine, Liberace and Doris Day, died of a lung disorder June 13 in Los Angeles.Joseph Grunwald,76, an economist and former State Department official who was founding president of the Institute of the Americas, died of kidney cancer Wednesday in San Diego.
NEWS
December 23, 1995
Tom Pettit, 64, an award-winning television reporter who was the only broadcaster on the scene and on the air when Lee Harvey Oswald was killed in Dallas in 1963, died yesterday in New York of complications after surgery to repair a ruptured aorta. Mr. Pettit, who retired from NBC News this year, won three Emmy Awards, a Peabody Award and the Polk Memorial Award during a career that stretched from the Eisenhower era to the Clinton administration. His reports included interviews with every U.S. president since Harry S. Truman and political conventions in seven years.
NEWS
August 20, 1996
Joe Cruzan, 62, whose four-year battle to stop life support for his daughter, Nancy, sparked a national right-to-die debate, was found dead Saturday in Carterville, Mo., in an apparent suicide, police and family said. He was found hanged in his home by his wife, Joyce.Nancy Cruzan suffered permanent brain damage in a 1983 accident, leaving her in a vegetative state. Doctors said she could have lived 30 or 40 years.More than four years after the accident, Mr. Cruzan, a sheet-metal worker, and his wife went to court to get permission to remove their daughter's feeding tube, even as opponents sought to keep the lifeline connected.
NEWS
December 23, 1995
Tom Pettit, 64, an award-winning television reporter who was the only broadcaster on the scene and on the air when Lee Harvey Oswald was killed in Dallas in 1963, died yesterday in New York of complications after surgery to repair a ruptured aorta. Mr. Pettit, who retired from NBC News this year, won three Emmy Awards, a Peabody Award and the Polk Memorial Award during a career that stretched from the Eisenhower era to the Clinton administration. His reports included interviews with every U.S. president since Harry S. Truman and political conventions in seven years.
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