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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 20, 2006
Yippee-ki-yay, Baltimoreans! If you see an intense hard guy with a sardonic grin and a slick bald pate tooling through Baltimore this week, for once it may really be Bruce Willis. The star is scheduled to come here beginning this weekend to film Live Free or Die Hard, the fourth Die Hard movie and the first since Die Hard With a Vengeance in 1995. (All told, the first three films grossed more than $740 million worldwide.) The production has set up headquarters for a weeklong shoot in the city, starting Saturday.
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By Colin Campbell and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Former Terps women's basketball players Marissa Coleman and Kim Rodgers sat quietly at a table in Looney's Bar and Pub on Route 1 in College Park as Sunday's Final Four game came to an end. Maryland lost, 87-61, to undefeated Notre Dame at Bridgestone Arena in Nashville Sunday, ending an inspired run to the national semifinal. The Fighting Irish (37-0) dominated the Terps (28-7) and led by 17 at halftime, en route to their third championship appearance in four years. It was a sad ending for the fans - those in Maryland and others who watched in Tennessee.
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By Paul Davidson and Paul Davidson,Los Angeles Times | June 19, 2007
With the release of Live Free or Die Hard drawing near, Bruce Willis finds himself reaching out directly to angry fans to keep the fourth Die Hard film from, well, dying hard. One reason fans are angry is 20th Century Fox's decision to make this a PG-13 film unlike the first three, which were R-rated. This decision -- blasphemy to many fans -- was made public in this month's issue of Vanity Fair, in which Willis expressed his disappointment in the movie's new rating: "I really wanted this one to live up to the promise of the first, which I always thought was the only really good one," he said.
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By Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
The race car - what's left of it - sits in a yard in Middle River, a rusty hulk entombed by weeds. The engine's gone; the tires rotted. "It ain't very pretty to look at," Pete Kantorsky, Jr. said of the 1937 Ford. But one man's junk is another's treasure. Sitting by his old jalopy, which he drove at Dorsey Speedway in the 1960s, Kantorsky pats the side of the run-down stock car as a jockey might greet an aging racehorse. "I see this car and I think about the good times and the bad," he said.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Bruce Willis sightings. Traffic jams that left drivers fuming. Helicopters whizzing through the city sky. A heavy dose of moviemaking razzle-dazzle, right here in Charm City. It all started with a cell phone call. Maryland Film Office director Jack Gerbes was preparing to take off for last year's Fourth of July holiday when some folks from 20th Century Fox put a call out. They were getting ready to film Live Free or Die Hard, the fourth film in the blockbuster Die Hard franchise, and were looking for a location to shoot a few big scenes.
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By GREGORY KANE | November 4, 1998
I FLASHED MY daylong bus pass at the subway station attendant just as I noticed the tune he was singing, only slightly above a whisper."I never heard about or caught her playing. "A line from the Temptations' "The Girl's Alright With Me," quite possibly the most exquisite song ever recorded."Ah, a Tempts tune," I said. "Did you watch the movie?""Didn't everybody?" he answered.No doubt most die-hard Temptations fans did. Others simply wouldn't have to. There wasn't much the NBC miniseries "The Temptations" could tell die-hard Tempts fans that we didn't already know.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Bruce Willis go BOOM!"Die Hard With a Vengeance" is an explosive thrill ride. That is its sole purpose, and it succeeds, loudly and breathlessly. And although it parallels the first "Die Hard" -- which destroyed only an L.A. office building, not huge chunks of New York, as this one does -- it doesn't deal with any of that namby-pamby rescue-the-wife stuff.One wishes it would perhaps evoke more emotions than "Wow, cool!" or that the audience wouldn't cheer quite so loudly when characters are killed in exceedingly nasty ways, but what the heck.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | June 26, 2007
Live Free or Die Hard, the fourth film in the Die Hard franchise, comes after a 12-year hiatus but easily returns to all the requisite high-octane traditions. Lots of stuff gets blown up; lots of bad guys do bad things; lots of chances come for our hero, John McClane, to laugh in the face of death just one more time. The film's action doesn't disappoint; if anything, it ups the adrenaline ante considerably. And one could forgive McClane for losing his sense of humor -- that's what happens when enough bad guys try to kill you. But when the filmmakers chronicling McClane's exploits in the Die Hard movies lose the connection with their funny bones, that's a problem.
FEATURES
June 22, 2007
THE QUESTION The fourth installment of Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis, comes out next week. What is the continued allure of this series, which follows the heroics of police officer John McClane? Please send your thoughts in a brief note with your name, city and daytime phone number (and Such a Critic in the memo field) to arts@baltsun.com. We will publish the best answers we receive.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Film Critic | June 29, 2007
We welcome a guest gripist this week: Live Free or Die Hard director Len Wiseman. The subject of our spotlight (see Page 3) was amused by early speculation that his film, the fourth in the blockbuster Die Hard franchise, centered on a plot to sabotage the Internet. In an interview last month, he chuckled at rumors of Bruce Willis' John McClane - who thwarts bad guys intent on explosive evil - fighting to save the information highway. "I'd seen a lot of stuff like, you know, `John McClane fights against a man who's going to take down the Internet,'" Wiseman said.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Ellen Zipper's summer Saturdays start early. Throughout the season, the Owings Mills resident rises around 5 a.m. She checks her computer, visiting Craigslist for the umpteenth time that week, making last-minute adjustments to her plans for the day. Around 7, with a strategy in place, she boards her white minivan, heading out for a warm morning tour of Baltimore County and Baltimore City yard sales, consignment shops and flea markets, hoping...
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By David Nitkin | January 29, 2013
The gift came from a son cementing a bond with his dad. I tore the paper off the present, revealing a figurine of a kneeling football player, chin cleft and stylized minuteman helmet leaving no doubt about the identity. Hello, Tom Brady! It was something I would never buy for myself. Still, I was glad to own it. Its usual home is a glass-door cabinet in my bedroom. But when the leaves fall and the daylight hours dwindle and Sundays are spent on the sofa, I like to bring it to work and position it on my desk.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Lorraine Mirabella and Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
As much of the Baltimore region shut down, some businesses made sure they could stay open - come hurricane and high water. The Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel brought in sandbags, ordered $30,000 in extra food and arranged for employees to stay overnight for the duration of the storm. The owner of Kooper's Tavern and two other Fells Point bars prepared to put his workers up Monday and Tuesday nights in his bed-and-breakfast, conveniently emptied by cancellations. Safeway rearranged shifts as it trucked in ice and extra bottled water to its grocery stores.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
On Sunday morning, Bryan Cronin will go to church and pray for a Ravens victory. Then he'll don his trusty Kelly Gregg jersey and board a bus to the stadium, four hours before game time. That the Baltimore contractor will be performing his game day rituals in Kansas City hardly matters to him. He will go anywhere for a Ravens game — except Pittsburgh, which might as well be a circle of hell as far as he's concerned. "I like to travel, I like to see different cities and I'm a Ravens nut," said Cronin, who hasn't missed a non- Steelers game in eight years.
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By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
It was like a reward challenge: Endure a chilly, drizzly night in the elements and be among the first to try out for the reality television show Survivor. "If we can hack that, we can hack Survivor, absolutely," said Casey Starshine, who waited 14 hours with her 9-year-old son, Uriah. More than a dozen hardy souls did the same, huddling overnight under an open-sided tent at a Catonsville car dealership before Saturday morning's casting call. By day's end, more than 400 would-be contestants filed into Antwerpen Hyundai, where WJZ-TV set up two cameras.
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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | December 24, 2008
The old glass aspirin bottle sits on the desk in Elmer Kreisel's home in Towson. What's inside, he says, is good for what ails you - if you grew up a Colts fan in Baltimore. The contents? Seven slivers of wood Kreisel tore from a goal post at Yankee Stadium after the 1958 NFL championship game in which the Colts defeated the New York Giants. To him, the fragments are cherished keepsakes of a glorious era. Treasured relics from "The Greatest Game Ever Played." Splendid splinters, all. "I never gave away any of them," said Kreisel, 70, a retired physics professor at Towson University.
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By Paul Willistein and Paul Willistein,The Allentown Morning Call | May 22, 1995
"Way to go, Bruce!" a man shouted, standing at his New York movie theater seat, his fist thrust into the the air following a preview of "Die Hard With a Vengeance.""Yeah, I heard that," Mr. Willis, who was in the audience, said during an interview.Mr. Willis, back with original "Die Hard" director John McTiernan, has been depicted as not unlike the dyspeptic policeman, John McClane, he plays in the three "Die Hard" movies: cranky, obnoxious and aloof. But on this day, Mr. Willis is laid-back.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 29, 2006
Eric Buarque hears it all the time: He looks just like that actor from those Die Hard films. You know, Bruce Willis. "One time I was traveling, I can't remember what airport it was, I had a bunch of young girls who were literally trembling who came up to me," the Columbia resident says. "I had my picture taken with them; it kind of made their day. As far as they know, they had their picture taken with Bruce Willis. They were happy." This week, Buarque has turned his resemblance to the rich and famous into a profit-making enterprise, landing a job as the actor's stand-in during the Baltimore shoot of the fourth Die Hard film, Live Free or Die Hard, which pits Willis' NYPD Detective John McClane against terrorists looking to wreak havoc on America via the Internet.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 12, 2008
Lots of things get shot in Baltimore. The breeze. Action movies. Bad guys. But waterfowl, not so much. So what was a famous shotgun manufacturer doing on the wide-open asphalt of West Baltimore this past weekend? Shooting something else: a commercial. This portion of U.S. 40 is a submerged highway between the Social Security building and a commuter train lot that allows you to traverse the inner city without actually seeing it, and it's apparently the perfect place for Benelli USA to film an ad for ESPN and the Outdoor Channel.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | October 22, 2008
GLEN ROCK, PA. - When Bob Bogart married in 1989, his streak was in its infancy, about 500 games. His new bride couldn't have known it would keep going, that it would last 19 more years and counting, that it would be acknowledged by his heroes. Still, Lauri Bogart said she wasn't blindsided. "It's pretty obvious when you are around him," she said. "You know there is something else on his mind all the time, even in the offseason. "And all these people keep giving him attention for being nuts.
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