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By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
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By Matt Schnabel and Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
For years, those fishing in East Coast waterways have faced bans on felt-soled boots and urgings that they scrub their gear to combat the spread of a pervasive algae. But a recent Dartmouth College study could turn such thinking on its head. Didymo, a species of diatom that produces threadlike stalks called "rock snot" blooms, long has been believed to represent an invasive threat to bodies of water across the nation, but the algae is largely native to those areas, according to the study.
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SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel and Tim Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
For years, those fishing in East Coast waterways have faced bans on felt-soled boots and urgings that they scrub their gear to combat the spread of a pervasive algae. But a recent Dartmouth College study could turn such thinking on its head. Didymo, a species of diatom that produces threadlike stalks called "rock snot" blooms, long has been believed to represent an invasive threat to bodies of water across the nation, but the algae is largely native to those areas, according to the study.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Tyler S. Gee, 16, can add several descriptives after his name, including rising junior at Hereford High School and aspiring Eagle Scout and aerospace engineer. Now he can tack on one more — riverkeeper — because of his efforts to deter the spread of an invasive algae found in the Gunpowder River. The Hereford resident has built eight wader washing stations, to state-established specifications, and positioned them along the northern Baltimore County waterway. Each wooden platform has a stiff brush, a basin of salt water, directions for use and a brief history of didymo, a freshwater algae that, if left unchecked, can spread and destroy aquatic life.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 20, 2009
When nature gives you a gift, take it. In winter, when the gift is a day in the 50s, that means playing hooky, even if it's just a few hours stolen from a day chockablock with work obligations and holiday to-do lists. But what to do? I could get arrested for drinking in a state park or walking carelessly at Loch Raven Reservoir. That would keep me from having to work the rest of the day - and probably for the rest of my life. Last Tuesday morning, my mind raced like Vanna White's fortune wheel before - click, click, click - stopping at the pie wedge marked "fishing."
SPORTS
By Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
When nature gives you a gift, take it. In winter, when the gift is a day in the 50s, that means playing hooky, even if it's just a few hours stolen from a day chockablock with work obligations and holiday to-do lists. But what to do? I could get arrested for drinking in a state park or walking carelessly at Loch Raven Reservoir. That would keep me from having to work the rest of the day - and probably for the rest of my life. Last Tuesday morning, my mind raced like Vanna White's fortune wheel before - click, click, click - stopping at the pie wedge marked "fishing."
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Tyler S. Gee, 16, can add several descriptives after his name, including rising junior at Hereford High School and aspiring Eagle Scout and aerospace engineer. Now he can tack on one more — riverkeeper — because of his efforts to deter the spread of an invasive algae found in the Gunpowder River. The Hereford resident has built eight wader washing stations, to state-established specifications, and positioned them along the northern Baltimore County waterway. Each wooden platform has a stiff brush, a basin of salt water, directions for use and a brief history of didymo, a freshwater algae that, if left unchecked, can spread and destroy aquatic life.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 23, 2008
With Memorial Day weekend about to begin, state biologists are racing to set up decontamination stations along six popular trout streams in an effort to stem the spread of an alien algae that destroys fish food supply and habitat. Strong saltwater is the enemy of didymo, an algae that forms a thick mat on the bottom of rivers and streams and suffocates plants, insects and tiny creatures. Scrubbing fishing gear and waders for a minute with a brush dipped in a saltwater solution kills microscopic traces of algae, preventing it from getting a free ride to another trout stream.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011
Dana Ely of Fulton writes: I will be forced to purchase $200 dollar rubber-soled wading boots because the state of Maryland used its regulatory power to ban felt soles. I don't think there was enough time for comment and wonder why this occurred since Didymo is already in the Gunpowder and Savage rivers. I think this was done far too quickly, without much comment from the stakeholders. The Department of Natural Resources could have emailed all trout stamp holders of a possible change in regulations.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 20, 2009
When nature gives you a gift, take it. In winter, when the gift is a day in the 50s, that means playing hooky, even if it's just a few hours stolen from a day chockablock with work obligations and holiday to-do lists. But what to do? I could get arrested for drinking in a state park or walking carelessly at Loch Raven Reservoir. That would keep me from having to work the rest of the day - and probably for the rest of my life. Last Tuesday morning, my mind raced like Vanna White's fortune wheel before - click, click, click - stopping at the pie wedge marked "fishing."
SPORTS
By Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
When nature gives you a gift, take it. In winter, when the gift is a day in the 50s, that means playing hooky, even if it's just a few hours stolen from a day chockablock with work obligations and holiday to-do lists. But what to do? I could get arrested for drinking in a state park or walking carelessly at Loch Raven Reservoir. That would keep me from having to work the rest of the day - and probably for the rest of my life. Last Tuesday morning, my mind raced like Vanna White's fortune wheel before - click, click, click - stopping at the pie wedge marked "fishing."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 23, 2008
With Memorial Day weekend about to begin, state biologists are racing to set up decontamination stations along six popular trout streams in an effort to stem the spread of an alien algae that destroys fish food supply and habitat. Strong saltwater is the enemy of didymo, an algae that forms a thick mat on the bottom of rivers and streams and suffocates plants, insects and tiny creatures. Scrubbing fishing gear and waders for a minute with a brush dipped in a saltwater solution kills microscopic traces of algae, preventing it from getting a free ride to another trout stream.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2008
Maryland's premier trout stream, Gunpowder Falls, is under attack from an algae strain feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Heavy, with the consistency of a wool coat, Didymosphenia geminata is a recent invader of East Coast waterways. It begins as microscopic organism that travels from stream to stream on boats, fishing gear and the bottoms of felt boots and waders. The algae is not hazardous to humans, but could have a "profound" effect on fish and the quality of freshwater streams and recreation, upsetting the delicate balance of nature, said Jonathan McKnight, coordinator of the Department of Natural Resources invasive species team.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
It's just equal piles of boulders and sand right now, pieces of a puzzle. But by the time the water warms and the anglers return to Sandy Point State Park, the pieces will be in their proper places as part of a $548,000 fishing platform jutting into the Chesapeake Bay. The idea belonged to Severn angler Skip Zinck. The spark was supplied by Maryland Parks Superintendent Nita Settina. The financial juice came from the Waterway Improvement Fund, which consists of the five percent tax collected when a boat is titled in the state.
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