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By Susan Reimer | June 25, 2000
When I talk about Maria, I tell people that she is my goddaughter. That's not technically correct. Her sister Amanda, born just weeks before my son arrived, is my godchild. That's why Joe and Amanda refer to each other as god-cousins. It is a useful term because it allows these two teen-agers to be close friends without any awkwardness. But that doesn't explain my relationship to Maria, unless you want to call me her god-aunt, and it is important to me that people understand that she is more to me than the daughter of a friend, or a neighbor's child, or one of my children's friends.
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NEWS
October 18, 2013
In his commentary ("Beneath contempt," Oct. 17), columnist Leonard Pitts Jr. of The Miami Herald is very critical of Dr. Ben Carson's recent comparison of Obamacare to slavery. It is only natural that Mr. Pitts, being of African American ancestry, would jump to the conclusion that Dr. Carson had in mind slavery only as the keeping of slaves as practiced here in early America. I would suggest slavery has many other connotations such as "estate of subjection like that of a slave" and "compulsory service often such as required by law" (Webster's Dictionary)
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Someone walked off with my dictionary. Rather, my dictionary walked off, not quite of its own accord, but on its own two feet, carrying the contents of a desk and sporting a black fedora. It was not an ordinary dictionary. It was not, to use one of the dictionary's least favorite cliches, your father's dictionary. It was your great-grandfather's dictionary, one partial to fountain pens, bow ties and - the most charming anachronism yet - the proper use of the English language. Baltimore Sun copy desk director John McIntyre was laid off this week after 23 years at the paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Sujata Massey opened the door of her refrigerator and pulled out a curry made from pink potatoes and zucchini. It was the best way she could think of to demonstrate what's going on inside her head when she sits down to write a novel. "I'm an odd person," says Massey, who recently returned with her family to Baltimore after a six-year hiatus. "This is the kind of thing I make, and my kids are not excited by the look of it. If I make a hamburger, I make it with Indian spices. There will never be a tuna casserole in this house.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Baltimore City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young left a public hearing last night disappointed for two reasons.First, his bill to prohibit the use of city money to buy reference books that contain racial slurs drew opposition from the city solicitor, the school board and the city's Office of Community Relations.Second, only one person showed up to talk about it -- and she opposed it.Young's bill would prohibit using city money to purchase reference books and materials for schools and libraries that contain any words "commonly understood to be racial epithets or racial slurs."
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 26, 2005
CHICAGO -- What is in a word? For Israelis and Palestinians, words are much more than their dictionary definition, two professors say. Words stir feelings, rouse nations to greatness, label enemies as evil. Language can lead to war or promote peace. In the Middle East, words can magnify misunderstanding, keeping peace just out of reach. To combat the problem, Ilai Alon and Assad Busool - one Israeli, one Palestinian, both professors of Islamic studies in Chicago - are creating a dictionary of terms they hope will shed light on how each side defines issues and events that have shaped a decades-long conflict.
NEWS
By BETTY BEARD and BETTY BEARD,ARIZONA REPUBLIC | June 9, 1999
PHOENIX -- Dorothy Bray can translate hundreds of Apache words and explain how to write their clicking and nasal sounds.She knows all about Apache grammar and how words spoken by White Mountain Apaches in central Arizona differ from those of San Carlos Apaches near Phoenix.Just just don't ask her to speak Apache."I'm too chicken," says the 60-year-old retired college teacher who spent nearly 15 years editing the new Western Apache-English Dictionary published last year by Arizona State University.
FEATURES
By Denise Flaim and Denise Flaim,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2002
Sitting across from the antique English gout chair, surrounded by majolica cheesekeeps and an Art Nouveau slipper box, Adam Hanft offers up a few of his favorite phrases of the future. "Secondhand speech" is one. Inspired by "secondhand smoke," it refers to too-loud cell phone conversations. You can relate. "I like it because it fills a need," explains Hanft, a marketing executive and cultural critic, whose object-filled home in New York is an apt metaphor for his most recent collection, this one of words: the recently released Dictionary of the Future (Hyperion, $22.95)
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
Seeking more street cred (n. popularity with or acceptance by the common people), Webster's New World College Dictionary has added almost 80 new words and definitions, an update that reflects the nation's current obsessions, from Al Qaeda and WMD on one hand to Botox and LASIK on the other. The 1,700-page dictionary is updated every year, as editors try to keep pace with a constantly evolving language and include what they deem the breakout (adj. achieving, resulting in, or characterized by sudden or unexpected success or popularity)
NEWS
November 14, 2003
IT'S NOT too often that a dictionary can cause a stir, but Merriam-Webster's Collegiate 11th edition has riled food giant McDonald's to the point that this month it mustered its PR machine to pressure the lexicographers into apologizing for their definition of McJob and deleting it from page and screen. Far from "a low-paying job that requires little skill and provides little opportunity for advancement," as Webster's defines it, jobs at McDonald's are instead "all about opportunity for hundreds of thousands of Americans," a spokesman said back in July, when the dictionary was released.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
The answer to The Sun's question about what could possibly be the point of denying illegal immigrants in Maryland driver's licenses can be found in Webster's dictionary ("State Senate approves driver's licenses for illegal immigrants" Mar 25). The word "illegal" means: unlicensed, prohibited, forbidden, unauthorized, and criminal, just to name a relevant few! And if and until immigration reform is accomplished, I suggest that the state of Maryland and every other state try following the letter of the law, for once, and deport the illegal immigrants instead of rewarding them.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
At harm-less drudg-ery , the nonpareil Kory Stamper of Merriam-Webster reflects on what wany people want of a dictionary : Authority, Morality, Law-giving, Bet-settling. She contrasts that with what dictionaries humbly offer instead: words and how people use them.  Here's a key sentence: We enter the words “murder” and “headcheese” into the dictionary, but that shouldn't be read as advocacy for trying either one of them.  I commend the entire essay to you. It is an hoot.   
NEWS
August 29, 2012
A quarter-century ago, when I began work on the copy desk of The Baltimore Sun , I was still a hard-edged prescriptivist (though not quite as great an insufferable usage snob as when I was a graduate student in English). I knew people who thought that the late John Bremner was the Received Word on English usage. I worked with people who relentlessly followed the Associated Press Stylebook , even when it was idiotic. I was of their party. Today, not so much. Let me quote a sentence from John McWhorter's informative and entertaining The Power of Babel : "Language mixture, then, is universal and inevitable.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
On my desk at The Sun and on my shelves at Loyola and home are copies of Webster's New World College Dictionary . As old as I am, the dictionary is in common use in newsrooms and is the reference dictionary for the Associated Press Stylebook . But back in March, Allan Metcalf reported at Lingua Franca that the dictionary may be moribund. There appear to be no lexicographers actively at work to update it, and he can get no information on its status from the publisher, John Wiley & Sons.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Posting yesterday on my personal blog , I said that the city had planted a redbud tree on the tree lawn in front of the house. Eagle-eyed Jan Freeman spotted that and wrote to ask where I had heard of tree lawn , which she suspected was not a term native to me. She was quite right. Elizaville, Kentucky, has no tree lawns, and I'm not sure what they would be called there if there were any. I learned tree lawn years ago from a colleague at The Cincinnati Enquirer who had grown up in New York City.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
I was not around for the conception of the Dictionary of American Regional English and was only generally aware of its long gestation. And though I was not present for the accouchement, I did get to attend the christening yesterday. The National Endowment for the Humanities threw a reception at the Old Post Office Building in Washington* for the publication of the fifth and concluding volume of the dictionary.** Joan Houston Hall, the chief editor, and Ben Zimmer, the linguist, spoke about the heroic accomplishment, and family members of the late Frederic Cassidy, the original editor, were present to share in the triumph.
NEWS
January 10, 2007
tastings.com This site from the Chicago-based Beverage Testing Institute has a hefty database of reviews of wine, beer and spirits, plus a wine dictionary and food-matching guide. Kate Shatzkin
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes | June 23, 1999
Words come alive on Merriam-Webster's Word Central Web site, www.wordcentral.com. It is full of ways for kids and parents to enjoy words and language.The site, produced by the well-known publisher of dictionaries and reference books, includes a dictionary that can quickly define most words for a puzzled reader. And it offers a daily "buzzword," complete with definition, pronunciation key and an example of its use in a sentence. Kids can use these words to stump their friends in a battle of brains.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Someone walked off with my dictionary. Rather, my dictionary walked off, not quite of its own accord, but on its own two feet, carrying the contents of a desk and sporting a black fedora. It was not an ordinary dictionary. It was not, to use one of the dictionary's least favorite cliches, your father's dictionary. It was your great-grandfather's dictionary, one partial to fountain pens, bow ties and - the most charming anachronism yet - the proper use of the English language. Baltimore Sun copy desk director John McIntyre was laid off this week after 23 years at the paper.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | April 12, 2009
A new partnership between seven Rotary Clubs in Howard County and the school system will give every third-grader in the county a new dictionary, school officials said. The dictionaries have been distributed since the beginning of the school year to the 3,500 third-graders in the county, said school system spokeswoman Patti Caplan. Dictionaries also have been given to the Bridges Program, an after-school program for underachieving students. Under the partnership, which is scheduled to be formalized Wednesday, the seven clubs have agreed to purchase and distribute copies of A Student's Dictionary & Gazetteer.
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