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NEWS
July 31, 2012
Governor O'Malley is determined to show off his power again by calling for a special session of the legislature. What a little boy he is. For him it's always "my way or the highway!" When will Marylanders learn that it is past time to turn these Democrats out? F. Cordell
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
Members of both parties in the House of Representatives held their noses this week to pass legislation authorizing the president to train foreign forces to confront the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, and the Senate is due to vote on the same measure today. Many Republicans have reluctantly supported the measure even though many think it doesn't go far enough, while many Democrats back it in a show of solidarity with their party's president despite serious misgivings about where a war vote could ultimately lead.
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NEWS
February 6, 2014
In reference to Jules Witcover's commentary ( "A more realistic president?" Feb. 4), I was highly disturbed by the statement, "After five years of partisan holdups, President Obama is ready to override Congress. " This definitely sounds as if President Barack Obama needs to be reminded that the United States of America is supposedly a democratic nation, a government of the people, for the people and by the people, but after reading this commentary and listening to the State of the Union speech, it sounds to me as if our country is now being headed by a dictator rather than a president.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
Here we are again. Americans with leftist values bring more immorality to the world. Whatever one's view on the appropriateness of going into Iraq, strong, adult and moral Americans stay and finish their job ( "Obama has painted himself into a foreign policy corner," June 16). But again, just as they did in Vietnam, the political left acts like weak children with no moral compass. They abandon the messiness of life and our moral commands as Americans. They leave millions to the oppression, rape, torture and murder that will come from people, this time not communists but radical Islamists.
NEWS
By DOUG STRUCK | January 16, 1994
Hafez el Assad is the dictator's dictator: strong, long-lasting, and if not beloved, at least not reviled by his people.The leader of Syria, who will meet President Clinton in Geneva today, has been said to be comparable to Saddam Hussein, only smarter. There are many similarities, though the two autocrats -- are old and committed foes.The comparison is key to a question at the heart of today's Geneva summit: Is the United States making the same mistake by dealing with Mr. Assad that it made with Mr. Hussein?
FEATURES
By Douglas Nivens II and For The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
A couple weekends ago, Enrique and I invited our friends over to his house for a barbeque. With everyone relaxed and having a good time, the conversation turned to our wedding plans. First, “So, what's your theme for the wedding?”  “The theme is us,” I said. Next came the follow-up, “What are your colors?” “Red and blue, but not patriotic. They're our favorite colors.” “Do you know what the guys and girls are wearing for the wedding?” I explained that the men are wearing tuxedos, but for the women, we would give each attendant our color choice and have her pick out a dress she felt best wearing.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 15, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Until this week, the chief judge in Saddam Hussein's genocide trial had seemed to be just what the chaotic judicial process against Iraq's former ruler needed: He was stern, judicious, efficient and brisk, and court sessions were proceeding in a disciplined fashion. Then yesterday, Abdullah al-Amiri, a 25-year veteran of Iraq's judiciary, made a startling comment that dropped jaws inside the courtroom in Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone and raised fresh questions over the fairness of the effort to bring Hussein to justice, telling the former dictator that he does not believe that he was in fact a "dictator."
NEWS
March 1, 1998
THE MEETING of the People's Consultative Assembly of Indonesia, starting today, is the last chance President Suharto has to commit his nation to reforms to end its economic crisis, meet International Monetary Fund requirements, diminish his family's stranglehold on the national wealth and promise the people a better future. There is scant hope that he will.When the assembly winds up March 11, "electing" the military dictator to a sixth term as president and presumably his anti-reform crony, B. Jusuf Habibie, as vice president, it may be too late.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2004
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - An appeals court in Chile has revoked the immunity from prosecution granted in 2002 to the country's former military dictator, Gen. Augusto Pinochet, reopening the possibility that he might be brought to trial for human rights abuses committed during the nearly 17 years he was in power. In a 14-9 decision, the judges rejected yesterday the arguments of Pinochet's lawyers that he is incapable of facing such charges because he suffers from senile dementia. The verdict was so unexpected that one of the lawyers who filed the request early this month to strip the former dictator of immunity, Juan Subercaseaux, described it as "a miracle."
NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2003
COMALAPA, Guatemala - From behind bolted doors after dark, Vidalia Chali places blame for Guatemala's crippling climate of violence in an unusual place: the 1996 peace accords that ended the nation's civil war. "The criminals are taking advantage of the peace," said the peasant woman, 33, holding her 3-year-old daughter. "People say that since there is peace, the police can't do anything to them." That belief explains why Chali and others may be tempted to vote in today's presidential election for the firm hand of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, even in this valley where 108 massacre victims were exhumed this year from mass graves, many of them dating to Rios Montt's rule in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 2, 2014
Can we please stop holding the country hostage to crazy people? Every year a tiny number of mentally ill people go on horrific killing sprees. It just happened in California. I won't name the person because I think the media attention lavished on these horror shows encourages some of these young men -- and they are almost all young men -- to seek fame or validation through bloodshed. In an entirely human response, we get spun up into a frenzy of finger-pointing. In the aftermath of the Gabby Giffords shooting, many of the country's leading journalists and politicians suggested the former congresswoman was shot because of the "violent" political rhetoric of Sarah Palin, Rep. Michele Bachmann and other tea party-affiliated politicians.
NEWS
By Sidney Rocke | May 5, 2014
The recent passage of Maryland's Marijuana Decriminalization Bill was an act of rebellion. Not against society's norms, but against one man: House Judiciary Chairman Joseph Vallario. The bill easily passed the Senate and had overwhelming support from the Democratic Party. Yet Delegate Vallario, a Prince George's Democrat, essentially killed it by amending the bill to merely set up a task force to study the issue for the next two years. The original bill was resurrected and passed with minor amendments after a rebellion from a coalition ranging from the Black Caucus to conservative Libertarians, outraged at the sheer wastefulness of criminal prosecution for minor marijuana violations.
NEWS
By Stephanie Beran | March 30, 2014
Are men and women so different in their management styles? I am beginning to wonder. For years, the conventional wisdom has preached that to be successful in the corporate ranks, women had to become more like men. Be hard driving. Work long hours, with lots of "face time. " Show unbridled ambition. Demand what you want. I have watched lots of men - and women - try this approach, which I think of as the top-down, military-style model. The funny thing is, I have not seen it work very often.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 9, 2013
"The genius of you Americans," the Arab-nationalist and one-time president of Egypt, Gamal Abdel Nasser, once explained, "is that you never make clear-cut stupid moves, only complicated stupid moves which make us wonder at the possibility that there may be something to them which we are missing. " I've long taken patriotic pride in such statements of befuddlement from foreigners. America is a gloriously complicated thing. We often confuse our national creeds for universal principles.
FEATURES
By Douglas Nivens II and For The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
A couple weekends ago, Enrique and I invited our friends over to his house for a barbeque. With everyone relaxed and having a good time, the conversation turned to our wedding plans. First, “So, what's your theme for the wedding?”  “The theme is us,” I said. Next came the follow-up, “What are your colors?” “Red and blue, but not patriotic. They're our favorite colors.” “Do you know what the guys and girls are wearing for the wedding?” I explained that the men are wearing tuxedos, but for the women, we would give each attendant our color choice and have her pick out a dress she felt best wearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Rafael Trujillo collected bottle caps. Mao Zedong was wed to an older woman at age 14 but refused to consummate the marriage. Joseph Stalin was a choirboy who studied to be a Russian Orthodox priest. In "The Iron Bridge," Anton Piatigorsky used these real-life biographical snippets to write a short story collection that imagines six infamous dictators as still-impressionable teens. Adolf Hitler conducted an elaborate fantasy romance with a girl who probably didn't know he existed.
NEWS
September 17, 2006
The judge presiding in Saddam Hussein's genocide trial shocked prosecutors and others with that comment, offered last week in the midst of trial testimony. The comments came one day after prosecutors demanded al-Amiri's resignation, complaining that he was too soft on Saddam. ?You are not a dictator. It is the people who surround a man who make him a dictator.? Abdulla al-Amiri
NEWS
December 2, 2007
RASSIM AL-JUMAILI, 69 Iraqi comedian Rassim al-Jumaili, a veteran Iraqi comedian who left his homeland after the U.S. invasion and portrayed a sarcastic dictator in his final role this year, died of heart disease yesterday in Syria, where he fled in 2003, Iraq's Sharqiyah satellite channel reported. Mr. al-Jumaili's last role was in the series The Leader, which drew a large Iraqi audience during the holy month of Ramadan. In it he played an unnamed dictator. The series was believed to be a parody of the post-Saddam Hussein administration.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The recent article on multiculturalism by Bob Ehrlich ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2) and the response by Wally Pinkard ("America is more than baseball and apple pie," June 7) have opened up a credible discussion on the root causes of political philosophy. I applaud The Sun for offering this polemic for readers to digest and learn from. The advantages of immigration and multiculturalism to the world and the U.S. are so obvious that they do not need discussion. The root cause of the multiculturalism debate is religious secularism and intolerance.
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