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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
The pungent, haunting narrative of Laura Lippman's new novel, "The Most Dangerous Thing," kicks in with a group of kids arguing for dibs on a grassy kickball field near a cotton mill on "Wetheredsville Road. " The whole scene sounds like a cozy nostalgia trip. But that patch of grass really does exist - in Charm City, no less - in isolated, rustic Dickeyville. Lippman grew up there, and "The Most Dangerous Thing" is full of vivid backgrounds and behavior - some factual, some imagined - pulled from or inspired by the youth she spent in this improbable neighborhood on the western edge of Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Gladys C. Spare, a retired antiques dealer and artist who was a self-proclaimed Francophile, died June 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm of complications from a fall she had suffered two weeks earlier. She was 94. The daughter of a carpenter and a dressmaker, Gladys Catherine Woods was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. After graduating in 1936 from Hamilton High School, she attended an art school in New Jersey, and later at the Maryland Institute College of Art . She also studied with R. McGill Mackall, the Maryland muralist and Dickeyville resident, who died in 1982.
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NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
Virginia L. Sandlass, a local historian and former member of numerous civic groups, died Tuesday of a heart attack at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 95 and lived at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was born Virginia Allison in Bridgeville, Pa., and grew up in the Pittsburgh area, graduating from Tarentum High School in 1925. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1929 with a degree in English literature and moved to New York City, where she modeled for department stores, worked in a law firm and, in 1932, married Henry L. Sandlass, an architect.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Brown and Rachel Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 1999
An old sign for Dickeyville once proclaimed it "the most interesting development in America." But "development" is not what comes to mind when looking at this quaint 200-year-old historic district, complete with winding cobblestone streets, white picket fences, towering trees and generations of landscaping.Residents call Dickeyville a village.Longtime residents Joan and Sam McCready said the area is reminiscent of the old village green in their home country of Ireland. "It's the place where everyone comes together to celebrate as a village," Sam McCready said.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 15, 1994
Good news for ferrets and the people who love them: Those small, mildly stinky critters may now be bought and sold without a special permit in the city. Ferrets are no longer considered wild animals by the health department. The city had been the only metropolitan-area subdivision that restricted ownership of the increasingly popular pets, a domesticated variety of polecat. The Baltimore Ferret Club is quite excited by all this -- though I'll bet they're not too excited by my use of "mildly stinky."
BUSINESS
By KERRY O'ROURKE and KERRY O'ROURKE,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Dickeyville's quiet, narrow streets and historic homes may lure buyers to the West Baltimore neighborhood, but once residents settle in, they rave about the neighbors."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | June 5, 2008
Bert Page Smith, a retired mechanical engineer who spent 25 years restoring a pre-Civil War house in historic Dickeyville, died Friday of heart failure at Timber Ridge Nursing Center in Dunnellon, Fla. He was 96. Mr. Smith was born in Washington, the son of Elbert Lucian Smith, who was chief of staff to an Arkansas congressman. He was raised in Washington and Arkansas, and returned to Pine Bluff with his family in 1923. After graduating from Pine Bluff High School in 1931, he attended George Washington University in Washington.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2012
A Baltimore police officer watching for vandals in the Dickeyville community arrested a 15-year-old boy Sunday and charged him with slashing the tires on two cars. Police said someone cut the tires of at least two vehicles, and possibly more, Friday night or Saturday morning. The incidents occurred in the 2300 and 2400 block of Pickwick Road. The community is located on the western edge of Baltimore, near the start of Interstate 70. After residents called police, an officer in the Southwestern District went on alert and kept a close watch on the neighborhood, said Detective Jeremy Silbert, a city police spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | August 2, 2009
Just beyond the south-side entrance to Dickeyville, a mill town established in 1772, the home of Brooks Woodward and Riess Livaudais is one of the first few you see. Its steeply pitched roof and twin gables trimmed in lacelike, wooden cut-outs commonly referred to as gingerbread, attest to its architectural style of Victorian Gothic. Constructed of brick, fieldstone and clapboard, this three-story home is believed to have served as an officers' infirmary during the War of 1812 (as noted on a shiny brass plaque at the front door)
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 16, 2012
While on the winding road in the Patapsco River Valley, I thought it had been 30 years since I last visited Oella, the mill village tucked deep into the hills between Catonsville and Ellicott City's Main Street. On a fall day, the rocky terrain, steep hillsides and leaf colors suggested that Oella might be in Vermont or West Virginia. Then I turned a bend and a resplendently restored Oella Mill appeared. It was one of those astounding moments, as if you hadn't been to Baltimore's harbor for 40 years and returned today.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2012
A Baltimore police officer watching for vandals in the Dickeyville community arrested a 15-year-old boy Sunday and charged him with slashing the tires on two cars. Police said someone cut the tires of at least two vehicles, and possibly more, Friday night or Saturday morning. The incidents occurred in the 2300 and 2400 block of Pickwick Road. The community is located on the western edge of Baltimore, near the start of Interstate 70. After residents called police, an officer in the Southwestern District went on alert and kept a close watch on the neighborhood, said Detective Jeremy Silbert, a city police spokesman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
The pungent, haunting narrative of Laura Lippman's new novel, "The Most Dangerous Thing," kicks in with a group of kids arguing for dibs on a grassy kickball field near a cotton mill on "Wetheredsville Road. " The whole scene sounds like a cozy nostalgia trip. But that patch of grass really does exist - in Charm City, no less - in isolated, rustic Dickeyville. Lippman grew up there, and "The Most Dangerous Thing" is full of vivid backgrounds and behavior - some factual, some imagined - pulled from or inspired by the youth she spent in this improbable neighborhood on the western edge of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Barbara R. Worthington, a retired credit union administrative assistant and weaver, died June 29 of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Mount Washington resident was 70. Barbara Reeves, the daughter of a Presbyterian minister and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Hills and Riverdale, N.Y. She was a 1957 graduate of Riverdale Country School and earned a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1961 from William Smith College, now Hobart William Smith.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 1, 2010
Luther S. Sieck, a retired longtime floral supply salesman and Dickeyville resident, died in his sleep Jan. 22 at Mercy Ridge in Timonium. He was 100. Born at home in Federal Hill, Mr. Sieck was raised in Northwest Baltimore, where he attended Forest Park High School. Mr. Sieck worked as a driving instructor until the 1930s, when he joined Claymore C. Sieck, the wholesale family-owned flower firm established in 1918. For more than 40 years until retiring in the 1970s, Mr. Sieck traveled the East Coast selling the company's floral supplies.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | August 2, 2009
Just beyond the south-side entrance to Dickeyville, a mill town established in 1772, the home of Brooks Woodward and Riess Livaudais is one of the first few you see. Its steeply pitched roof and twin gables trimmed in lacelike, wooden cut-outs commonly referred to as gingerbread, attest to its architectural style of Victorian Gothic. Constructed of brick, fieldstone and clapboard, this three-story home is believed to have served as an officers' infirmary during the War of 1812 (as noted on a shiny brass plaque at the front door)
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | July 21, 1991
"Carolyn called me at work one day and said, 'I just got a call from somebody at Better Homes and Gardens,' " Robert Hill relates. "I said, 'Are they selling subscriptions?' "No indeed. Although the couple still can't quite believe it, their Dickeyville house had been "discovered" by one of Better Homes' editors, who thought it a perfect candidate for the shelter magazine's glossy pages."I asked first if they had the right house," Carolyn Hill says. "I wasn't being clever. I was really wondering."
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | June 5, 2008
Bert Page Smith, a retired mechanical engineer who spent 25 years restoring a pre-Civil War house in historic Dickeyville, died Friday of heart failure at Timber Ridge Nursing Center in Dunnellon, Fla. He was 96. Mr. Smith was born in Washington, the son of Elbert Lucian Smith, who was chief of staff to an Arkansas congressman. He was raised in Washington and Arkansas, and returned to Pine Bluff with his family in 1923. After graduating from Pine Bluff High School in 1931, he attended George Washington University in Washington.
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