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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 2001
Has anyone ever gotten more mileage out of one television franchise than Dick Wolf has with Law & Order on NBC? The original is the longest running drama on network television, and last season it successfully spawned Law and Order: Special Victims Unit. So, why not keep reaching? Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Wolf's latest spinoff for NBC, is a reach, and if you watch only one or two episodes, you'll probably conclude that Wolf has finally exceeded his grasp. Originally, Wolf said the novelty of Criminal Intent was that we would get to see the crime as it's being committed from the criminal's point of view instead of having to try to figure out who did it along with the detectives as on Law & Order.
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By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 24, 2008
Music awards squeezed in between performances With performances by some of music's hottest acts - Beyonce, Christina Aguilera, Kanye West, the Jonas Brothers and 15 others - who needs awards? The American Music Awards, presented yesterday during a live broadcast on ABC, kept with its long-held tradition of wedging prizes in between action-packed performances. "This year more than ever," said Orly Adelson, president of dick clark productions, which puts on the show, said last week. "We have 19 performances, which we've never done before ... Every big artist this year said yes, and we wanted them all."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 4, 2003
NEW YORK -- You could say that Dick Wolf is at the top of the world. His world, anyway. The 56-year-old television producer is standing in a conference room 22 stories above Lexington Avenue, looking through a wall of windows toward the Chrysler Building and the magic of Manhattan at dusk. In his double-breasted, blue Brioni blazer, charcoal-gray slacks, silk tie and French cuffs, Wolf exudes the polished confidence of a highly successful CEO. It's no wonder. His Hollywood production company, Wolf Films, now has five series airing on two networks, NBC and ABC. In addition to Law & Order, there's Law & Order: Criminal Intent; Law & Order: SVU; Dragnet; and Crime & Punishment.
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 3, 2006
The big theme in television these days: Make it young. Programmers serve up stories about young adults to please viewers in that age group and the advertisers who covet them. Thus, Dick Wolf, the estimable creator of Law & Order, concentrates on young assistant district attorneys in NBC's Conviction, a drama debuting tonight at 10 (WBAL, Channel 11). Wolf installs Alexandra Cabot (Stephanie March) of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as a bureau chief of the district attorney's office in New York.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 17, 1997
The concept of "Players" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) isn't new. A group of convicts is rounded up and given a shot at redemption. The catch is they have to work for the good guys by doing the jobs too dirty for the good guys to do, like "The Dirty Dozen" or "The A-Team."But producer Dick Wolf ("Law & Order") wraps that concept in some of the freshest and brightest packaging of the fall season ** by casting rapper Ice-T as one of the convicts. His presence helps give "Players" a young, urban feel as well as a puckish sense of humor that should play very well with the teen-age audience at which this series is aimed.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 24, 2008
Music awards squeezed in between performances With performances by some of music's hottest acts - Beyonce, Christina Aguilera, Kanye West, the Jonas Brothers and 15 others - who needs awards? The American Music Awards, presented yesterday during a live broadcast on ABC, kept with its long-held tradition of wedging prizes in between action-packed performances. "This year more than ever," said Orly Adelson, president of dick clark productions, which puts on the show, said last week. "We have 19 performances, which we've never done before ... Every big artist this year said yes, and we wanted them all."
FEATURES
By HAL BOEDEKER and HAL BOEDEKER,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 3, 2006
The big theme in television these days: Make it young. Programmers serve up stories about young adults to please viewers in that age group and the advertisers who covet them. Thus, Dick Wolf, the estimable creator of Law & Order, concentrates on young assistant district attorneys in NBC's Conviction, a drama debuting tonight at 10 (WBAL, Channel 11). Wolf installs Alexandra Cabot (Stephanie March) of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as a bureau chief of the district attorney's office in New York.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 2002
Law & Order starts its 13th season tonight with the debut of Sen. Fred Thompson, Tennessee Republican, as District Attorney Arthur Branch and a ripped-from-the-headlines story about an American Taliban who just might remind some viewers of John Walker Lindh. You have got to hand it to executive producer Dick Wolf - he does not let any rust settle on his franchise series. Wolf, who has championed the concept of actors as interchangeable parts, wastes not a second of tonight's show explaining the disappearance of Dianne Wiest, who left the series, as District Attorney Nora Lewin.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
A couple of local college alumni turn up in separate programs tonight, and WMAR-TV pre-empts ABC's "On Our Own" with a local news special.* "Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- %J Sports-and-advertising star Bo Jackson tries acting in an out-of-character guest appearance. He plays a nanny who comes to the rescue after Dr. Mark Sloan (Dick Van Dyke) delivers quadruplets. One-time Towson State University student Dwight Schultz ("The A-Team") has a role. CBS.* "The Wright Verdicts" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 8, 1994
"Fresh" is one word that's seldom appropriate in describing new network TV series. Primetime today is still mainly dominated by the formulas, genres and looks of the 1970s.But Fox's "New York Undercover," which premieres at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), is nothing if not fresh. Visually and culturally, it's one of the most refreshing new series of the fall season.On paper, it might look pretty much like a boilerplate TV cop drama. It's about two undercover detectives -- J. C. Williams (Malik Yoba)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 4, 2003
NEW YORK -- You could say that Dick Wolf is at the top of the world. His world, anyway. The 56-year-old television producer is standing in a conference room 22 stories above Lexington Avenue, looking through a wall of windows toward the Chrysler Building and the magic of Manhattan at dusk. In his double-breasted, blue Brioni blazer, charcoal-gray slacks, silk tie and French cuffs, Wolf exudes the polished confidence of a highly successful CEO. It's no wonder. His Hollywood production company, Wolf Films, now has five series airing on two networks, NBC and ABC. In addition to Law & Order, there's Law & Order: Criminal Intent; Law & Order: SVU; Dragnet; and Crime & Punishment.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 2002
Law & Order starts its 13th season tonight with the debut of Sen. Fred Thompson, Tennessee Republican, as District Attorney Arthur Branch and a ripped-from-the-headlines story about an American Taliban who just might remind some viewers of John Walker Lindh. You have got to hand it to executive producer Dick Wolf - he does not let any rust settle on his franchise series. Wolf, who has championed the concept of actors as interchangeable parts, wastes not a second of tonight's show explaining the disappearance of Dianne Wiest, who left the series, as District Attorney Nora Lewin.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 2001
Has anyone ever gotten more mileage out of one television franchise than Dick Wolf has with Law & Order on NBC? The original is the longest running drama on network television, and last season it successfully spawned Law and Order: Special Victims Unit. So, why not keep reaching? Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Wolf's latest spinoff for NBC, is a reach, and if you watch only one or two episodes, you'll probably conclude that Wolf has finally exceeded his grasp. Originally, Wolf said the novelty of Criminal Intent was that we would get to see the crime as it's being committed from the criminal's point of view instead of having to try to figure out who did it along with the detectives as on Law & Order.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 2000
You are inside a news meeting at the New York Ledger, the fictional tabloid paper at the heart of "Deadline," a jazzy newspaper drama premiering tonight on NBC. "Page 8?" managing editor Nikki Masucci (Bebe Neuwirth) asks demandingly as she takes her seat at one end of a long conference table. "One of the Mrs. Trump's corgis took a crap in the lobby of one of the Donald's casinos. I'm checking which one," says gossip columnist Hildy Baker (Hope Davis). "Great. Sports?" Masucci snaps.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 17, 1997
The concept of "Players" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) isn't new. A group of convicts is rounded up and given a shot at redemption. The catch is they have to work for the good guys by doing the jobs too dirty for the good guys to do, like "The Dirty Dozen" or "The A-Team."But producer Dick Wolf ("Law & Order") wraps that concept in some of the freshest and brightest packaging of the fall season ** by casting rapper Ice-T as one of the convicts. His presence helps give "Players" a young, urban feel as well as a puckish sense of humor that should play very well with the teen-age audience at which this series is aimed.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
A couple of local college alumni turn up in separate programs tonight, and WMAR-TV pre-empts ABC's "On Our Own" with a local news special.* "Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- %J Sports-and-advertising star Bo Jackson tries acting in an out-of-character guest appearance. He plays a nanny who comes to the rescue after Dr. Mark Sloan (Dick Van Dyke) delivers quadruplets. One-time Towson State University student Dwight Schultz ("The A-Team") has a role. CBS.* "The Wright Verdicts" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 2000
You are inside a news meeting at the New York Ledger, the fictional tabloid paper at the heart of "Deadline," a jazzy newspaper drama premiering tonight on NBC. "Page 8?" managing editor Nikki Masucci (Bebe Neuwirth) asks demandingly as she takes her seat at one end of a long conference table. "One of the Mrs. Trump's corgis took a crap in the lobby of one of the Donald's casinos. I'm checking which one," says gossip columnist Hildy Baker (Hope Davis). "Great. Sports?" Masucci snaps.
FEATURES
December 20, 2007
61 Uri Geller Illusionist 61 Dick Wolf Producer 41 Chris Robinson Rock singer 24 Jonah Hill Actor 17 JoJo Singer-actress
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 8, 1994
"Fresh" is one word that's seldom appropriate in describing new network TV series. Primetime today is still mainly dominated by the formulas, genres and looks of the 1970s.But Fox's "New York Undercover," which premieres at 9 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), is nothing if not fresh. Visually and culturally, it's one of the most refreshing new series of the fall season.On paper, it might look pretty much like a boilerplate TV cop drama. It's about two undercover detectives -- J. C. Williams (Malik Yoba)
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