Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDick Vitale
IN THE NEWS

Dick Vitale

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | December 11, 2008
King of Queens 7 p.m. [Ch. 45] Doug (Kevin James) wins two tickets to the Final Four, but his wife (Leah Remini) makes him take Arthur (Jerry Stiller) instead of his best pal. Hilarity ensues when Arthur meets up with Bob Knight, Digger Phelps and Dick Vitale and regales them with his college basketball expertise. I never saw this episode, so that last part probably doesn't happen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
ESPN's Dick Vitale said today that the impending snowstorm expected to hit the Baltimore-Washington region means he won't be able to travel north as planned for the network's broadcast of Wednesday night's Maryland-North Carolina game at Comcast Center. Vitale was scheduled to handle the game with Dan Shulman. “I won't be able to get out there,” said Vitale, who lives in Florida. Vitale called Maryland's season-opening game against Kentucky in Brooklyn, N.Y. ESPN said Fran Fraschilla would replace Vitale on the broadcast.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 22, 2008
Kevin Millar vows to be a little more careful about accepting basketball tips from a former national baseball writer. Peter Schmuck, a columnist at The Sun with a deep baseball background, approached Millar in the Orioles' clubhouse earlier this week and guaranteed a Southern California victory over Kansas State in the first round of the NCAA tournament. Millar has a long memory, so he took a short break before yesterday's game to relay the story. "Tell Schmuck to stick to writing. He's no NCAA basketball prognosticator," Millar said, fully aware that 11th-seeded Kansas State upset the sixth-seeded Trojans, 80-67.
SPORTS
By Sam Mellinger, Kansas City Star | September 15, 2011
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Dick Vitale will wait until a quiet moment, away from the VIPs and the parents and especially the sick kids, to admit this, but he's not sure what to say. How could he be? The words aren't coming to him. How could they? The people here at Children's Mercy Hospital invited Dickie V, the bald old man who has made a fortune connecting with people through television and college basketball, but he's looking into the eyes of kids younger than his own grandchildren who by rotten luck are fighting through struggles he can't imagine.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 10, 2008
Michael Avery, a 6-foot-4 eighth-grader from Lake Sherwood, Calif., hasn't even decided where he's going to attend high school yet. There are a number of prep schools around the country vying for his enrollment. But Avery, a rising basketball prospect on the AAU circuit, does know where he's going to attend college: the University of Kentucky. You see, the Wildcats have already offered him a basketball scholarship. Rivals.com broke the news to the world earlier this week, letting us know that Kentucky's coach, Billy Gillispie, had seen the 14-year-old play at an AAU tournament and decided he wanted to lock him up with an oral commitment before anyone else could.
SPORTS
By Newsday | July 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Jim Valvano is battling a virulent form of cancer called metastatic adrenal carcinoma and it has apparently spread along his back, according to his brother, Bobby Valvano.Valvano, the former basketball coach at North Carolina State turned broadcaster, is living with relatives in New York City while he receives out-patient chemotherapy at Manhattan's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.Valvano's doctors have told him and his family just what he is dealing with. "Metastasize means that it has advanced, it has spread," said Bobby Valvano.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
Finally, our long regional nightmare is over. Yesterday, after seeing a report in The Sun, a Timonium man stepped forward to take credit for dreaming up "Fear the turtle," the slogan that has become a rallying cry for University of Maryland basketball fans this season. His name is Drew Elburn. He's 32 and works for a computer consulting firm in Baltimore. And no, he didn't go to school at College Park - he attended Washington College. Elburn said he thought up the slogan three years ago as he and some friends drove to the MCI Center in Washington to watch the Terrapins play Stanford.
SPORTS
By Steve Nidetz and Steve Nidetz,Chicago Tribune | March 8, 1992
CHICAGO -- "Championship Week" began on ESPN yesterday morning, usually a joyful time for college basketball analyst Dick Vitale. But not this year. A couple of incidents this winter have left the usually manic Vitale "depressed."Instead of preparing to work with longtime pal Jim Valvano in the ESPN studios, Vitale has to defend himself for using an obscenity-laced statement during a commercial break of a recent cable telecast.The trouble started Jan. 14 when Vitale made an off-the-cuff remark about Ohio State forward Lawrence Funderburke's play against Indiana.
NEWS
By Mark Cloud | March 14, 2002
ATLANTA - March Madness - the men's college basketball tournament starting today - is one of the sports world's most exciting events. The tournament's pressure-packed lose-and-you're-out format, the oversized personalities of the coaches and the unpredictable last-second successes and failures of superb athletes make for great theater. And like any great drama or comedy - no real tragedies here - it has a language all its own. For basketball lovers who like nothing more than to spend hours on the couch watching games, the lingo makes sense.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | March 22, 2009
SportsCenter 6 p.m. [ESPN] It's a two-hour version, the perfect way to catch up on everything that happened during the first two rounds of the NCAA tournament, including analysis by Digger Phelps and his magical matching highlighter, Dick Vitale (left) and another edition of his coaches praise-athon, and Hubert Davis shaking his head at both of them.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 10, 2008
Michael Avery, a 6-foot-4 eighth-grader from Lake Sherwood, Calif., hasn't even decided where he's going to attend high school yet. There are a number of prep schools around the country vying for his enrollment. But Avery, a rising basketball prospect on the AAU circuit, does know where he's going to attend college: the University of Kentucky. You see, the Wildcats have already offered him a basketball scholarship. Rivals.com broke the news to the world earlier this week, letting us know that Kentucky's coach, Billy Gillispie, had seen the 14-year-old play at an AAU tournament and decided he wanted to lock him up with an oral commitment before anyone else could.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | April 10, 2008
It has been three days now, and the ground hasn't opened under the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., and swallowed up the building. So the selection of Dick Vitale didn't turn out as apocalyptic as one would have thought. Still, Vitale is in the most prestigious of basketball shrines and Jim Phelan is not. Not even Vitale, in his moment of glory on Monday, could understand that. But he believes he can explain it. So can one of his new fellow enshrinees, John Thompson, a coach who, like Vitale, thinks Springfield has an obvious void.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 22, 2008
Kevin Millar vows to be a little more careful about accepting basketball tips from a former national baseball writer. Peter Schmuck, a columnist at The Sun with a deep baseball background, approached Millar in the Orioles' clubhouse earlier this week and guaranteed a Southern California victory over Kansas State in the first round of the NCAA tournament. Millar has a long memory, so he took a short break before yesterday's game to relay the story. "Tell Schmuck to stick to writing. He's no NCAA basketball prognosticator," Millar said, fully aware that 11th-seeded Kansas State upset the sixth-seeded Trojans, 80-67.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 21, 2005
THOUGH THE run-up to its debut has been handled with ESPN's traditionally low-key approach, the basketball version of College GameDay premieres tomorrow. Taking ESPN's successful football approach of going live from college sites, GameDay begins a run of eight weeks from Connecticut's Gampel Pavilion. (The show will originate from Maryland's Comcast Center on Feb. 12, when the Terps play Duke.) Tomorrow's GameDay airs at 11 a.m., 8 p.m. and midnight (after the Pittsburgh-UConn game). Each show is an hour.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.