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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun StaffLOS ANGELES HC | July 19, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Dick Van Dyke said that when he first came out to Hollywood in 1960, he wanted to find one of his heroes, Stan Laurel of Laurel and Hardy fame, but everyone he asked said that they didn't know what had happened to him."One day in '61, I was looking in the Santa Monica phone book for a number, and there it was, Stan Laurel, Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica," Van Dyke told a press conference here, publicizing the return of his "Dick Van Dyke Show" to prime time. It will run at 9 p.m. weeknights on the basic-cable Nickelodeon network in the fall.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 2, 2004
In the spring of 1977, as The Mary Tyler Moore Show was about to end its extraordinary seven-year run on CBS, its leading lady was suffering mightily. "I could feel the separation anxiety welling up daily," Mary Tyler Moore wrote in her 1995 autobiography, After All. "I had spent more of my waking hours with the people on this show than I did my real family. ... The years that loomed ahead in my vision without the show seemed cold and gray and threatening. I would have to come to terms with what my abilities were.
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By Steve McKerrow | October 3, 1990
ODDS 'N' ENDS OFF THE BROADCAST BEAMS:* In a fun reader's poll earlier this year, Media Monitor discovered that "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961-66 on CBS) was the series viewers would most like to see return to the rerun airways. But have you noticed many of that show's veterans are popping up on new shows?Take "The Fanelli Boys," NBC's sitcom about four grown Italian sons who move back in with momma (at 9 tonight, Channel 2). The mother in question is played by Ann Guilbert, and if she has seemed vaguely familiar it's because she played Millie Helper in "The Dick Van Dyke Show," next door neighbor to Rob and Laura Petrie (Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 11, 2004
There are some television reunions that should not happen. The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited, which airs tonight at 9 on CBS, is one of them. At the core of the television viewing experience is an unstated compact into which we enter as we watch our favorite shows: We agree to suspend disbelief for 30 minutes or an hour to those writers and producers talented enough to invent imaginary worlds that bring us pleasure when we visit. The make-believe TV worlds that bring us the greatest pleasure live on in our memories like Camelot or Bedford Falls long after they have departed the prime-time airwaves.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 29, 1993
What's up tonight? Not much.* "General Hospital" (3-4 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Beginning today, Anthony Geary and Genie Francis are reunited as their old famous and familiar characters, Luke and Laura.* "Diagnosis: Murder" (8-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- This new Dick Van Dyke series opens with a memorable line of dialogue: A man in a confessional says ominously to the priest, "Forgive me, father, for YOU have sinned." Then it slips into more forgettable territory, casting Dick Van Dyke as a doctor who is equally passionate about medicine and mysteries -- and, somehow, equally devoted to both in terms of time and resources.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 3, 1992
Life is complicated and stressful, which is why we have TV to make us feel smart, and to help us sleep. CBS' "Diagnosis of Murder" is for those who find CBS' "Murder, She Wrote" too subtle. "Diagnosis" takes a basic three-suspect, two-clue "Murder" plot and stretches it out over two hours (Sunday at 9 p.m. on Channel 11), filling in the dead spots with obvious hints and a lot of footage of Dick Van Dyke tap-dancing.Mr. Van Dyke plays Dr. Mark Sloan, a fatherly internal medicine specialist with the proverbial penchant for sleuthing.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1994
Rob Petrie, the man who did more for the ottoman than anyone since the empire, returns to prime time tonight, nearly three decades after he, his family and his fellow writers for "The Alan Brady Show" ended their five-year run as the kings and queens of television comedy."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 17, 1991
Los Angeles"At first, I said it can't be done, because the memory of the show is too pure and respected," Mary Tyler Moore said yesterday. "But now I'm all for it."Mary's coming back. So is Lou. So is Archie, Edith and Meathead, too.CBS yesterday rolled out its February "sweeps" ratings strategy: reunions and retrospectives of shows that have earned a spot in our national memory.On Feb. 16, CBS will air the "All In The Family 20th Anniversary Special." On Feb. 17, Carol Burnett will host "The Very Best of The Ed Sullivan Show," and on Feb. 18, the network will offer "Mary Tyler Moore: The 20th Anniversary Show."
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December 23, 2003
Hope Lange, 70, who earned an Oscar nomination for her supporting role in the 1957 film Peyton Place and won two Emmys for playing the lead in the television series The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, died Friday in Santa Monica, Calif., after suffering an infection caused by intestinal inflammation, said her husband, former theatrical producer Charles Hollerith. Ms. Lange starred in dozens of films and television shows during a lengthy career and appeared with some of Hollywood's top actors. Her screen credits included The Best of Everything in 1959 with Joan Crawford, The Young Lions in 1958 with Marlon Brando, Wild in the Country in 1961 with Elvis Presley and Peyton Place with Lana Turner.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 11, 2004
There are some television reunions that should not happen. The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited, which airs tonight at 9 on CBS, is one of them. At the core of the television viewing experience is an unstated compact into which we enter as we watch our favorite shows: We agree to suspend disbelief for 30 minutes or an hour to those writers and producers talented enough to invent imaginary worlds that bring us pleasure when we visit. The make-believe TV worlds that bring us the greatest pleasure live on in our memories like Camelot or Bedford Falls long after they have departed the prime-time airwaves.
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December 23, 2003
Hope Lange, 70, who earned an Oscar nomination for her supporting role in the 1957 film Peyton Place and won two Emmys for playing the lead in the television series The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, died Friday in Santa Monica, Calif., after suffering an infection caused by intestinal inflammation, said her husband, former theatrical producer Charles Hollerith. Ms. Lange starred in dozens of films and television shows during a lengthy career and appeared with some of Hollywood's top actors. Her screen credits included The Best of Everything in 1959 with Joan Crawford, The Young Lions in 1958 with Marlon Brando, Wild in the Country in 1961 with Elvis Presley and Peyton Place with Lana Turner.
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By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | August 14, 2003
How can aging Hollywood figures stay youthful and relevant to young audiences? Increasingly, by becoming animated cartoon characters. Sunday night, Carl Reiner, 81, returns to TV, again portraying one of his most enduring characters - this time in cartoon form on TV Land's The Alan Brady Show. Producer Robert Evans, 73, will be two-dimensional this fall, playing his own legend in Kid Notorious on Comedy Central. And it was recently announced that Hugh Hefner, the 77-year-old founder of Playboy magazine, will lead an elite crime-fighting team of Playmates in Hef's Superbunnies, a cartoon being developed by comic book legend Stan Lee. The three will provide voices to the streamlined images of themselves.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
Despite all the secrecy, we do know a couple of things about tonight's "Seinfeld" finale.We know Kramer's not going to teach some Chinese POWs to play Mozart. We know Jerry's not going to finish his autobiography and have some big-name comedian agree to star in it. And we know the whole gang's not going to hug and exit singing "It's a Long Way to Tipperary."How do we know this? Because those endings have all been done before, as valedictories from some of the finest sitcoms ever to grace our TV screens.
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By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1997
At the close of the "Cosby" television show on Jan. 20, there appeared a still photograph of a man who was familiar onlyvaguely -- if familiar at all -- to most viewers. These words accompanied the picture: "In memory of Sheldon Leonard. My last father."Sheldon Leonard died Jan. 10 at age 89. He was a major player in producing entertainment programs for television in the early years of the medium. His career is a reminder that when great social forces are clashing in the United States, heroes can come from anywhere and epic victories can be won in unexpected places.
NEWS
January 12, 1997
Sheldon Leonard, 89, who went from playing Hollywood tough guys to producing such television hits as "The Andy Griffith Show," "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "I Spy," died Friday at his home in Beverly Hills.Leonard played underworld figures in the 1940s and 1950s, speaking out of the side of his mouth in such films as "Guys and Dolls" and "Pocketful of Miracles." One of his best-remembered roles was in 1946 when he played the bartender who threw Jimmy Stewart out on his ear in the classic "It's a Wonderful Life."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1996
A wonderful film, with Dick Van Dyke as an old-time movie comic fallen on hard times, is today's highlight, while an enjoyable trifle with Robert Downey Jr. protected by four ghosts should keep spirits high in the evening."
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By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | August 14, 2003
How can aging Hollywood figures stay youthful and relevant to young audiences? Increasingly, by becoming animated cartoon characters. Sunday night, Carl Reiner, 81, returns to TV, again portraying one of his most enduring characters - this time in cartoon form on TV Land's The Alan Brady Show. Producer Robert Evans, 73, will be two-dimensional this fall, playing his own legend in Kid Notorious on Comedy Central. And it was recently announced that Hugh Hefner, the 77-year-old founder of Playboy magazine, will lead an elite crime-fighting team of Playmates in Hef's Superbunnies, a cartoon being developed by comic book legend Stan Lee. The three will provide voices to the streamlined images of themselves.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
VCR alert: one of the greatest episodes of "The Dick Van Dyke Show" airs tonight. This one's a keeper."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In a repeat with more than its share of guest stars, Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders plays a professional musician hired by Central Perk to replace Phoebe (obviously they're going for a different sound), while Lea Thompson pops over from "Caroline In the City." NBC." 'Les Miserables' in Concert" (8 p.m.-11: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
VCR alert: one of the greatest episodes of "The Dick Van Dyke Show" airs tonight. This one's a keeper."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In a repeat with more than its share of guest stars, Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders plays a professional musician hired by Central Perk to replace Phoebe (obviously they're going for a different sound), while Lea Thompson pops over from "Caroline In the City." NBC." 'Les Miserables' in Concert" (8 p.m.-11: 30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1994
Rob Petrie, the man who did more for the ottoman than anyone since the empire, returns to prime time tonight, nearly three decades after he, his family and his fellow writers for "The Alan Brady Show" ended their five-year run as the kings and queens of television comedy."
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