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SPORTS
February 6, 2007
Ray Frager's media blog On Dick Enberg, Charley Casserly and rock-paper-scissors. Go to www.baltimoresun.com/mediumwell Roch Around the Clock Roch Kubatko on the death of Steve Barber. Go to baltimoresun.com/roch Varsity podcast A look at high school sports. Go to www.baltimoresun.com/varsitypod
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SPORTS
February 6, 2007
Ray Frager's media blog On Dick Enberg, Charley Casserly and rock-paper-scissors. Go to www.baltimoresun.com/mediumwell Roch Around the Clock Roch Kubatko on the death of Steve Barber. Go to baltimoresun.com/roch Varsity podcast A look at high school sports. Go to www.baltimoresun.com/varsitypod
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 21, 1996
Let the viewer beware: Not everything you'll see during the Olympics will be live.That seems obvious with the sheer volume of activity and a tight NBC telecast schedule, but how will you know what's live and what's taped?You probably won't, not if yesterday's first day of competition is an early indicator. The network did a fair amount of, shall we say, fudging, about what was happening as you watched, and what had already taken place.Swimming and gymnastics commentators only casually, and we suspect, unintentionally, let a few time references slip in, but save for a few things on the schedule, like the swimming finals, most of what aired was on tape.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 7, 2000
Verne Lundquist chuckled heartily the other day at the memory of a dinner conversation he had with former Southern California quarterback Pat Haden and NBA great Billy Cunningham at a Masters buffet in 1986 that perfectly summed up his career. Lundquist, who will call Sunday's Maryland-Duke men's basketball game for CBS (Channel 13, 1 p.m.) with Billy Packer, had worked with Haden and Cunningham on the network's college football and basketball packages, respectively, only to see the two of them become lead analysts for those sports.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 18, 1999
In the wake of the April 20 shootings in Littleton, Colo., the nation has been forced to examine the interaction among teen-agerswithin our high schools.The latest "Outside the Lines" special, airing Monday at 7: 30 p.m., takes a look at the gap between high school athletes and the rest of the student body, one of the many themes in the midst of the Columbine tragedy.For lead reporter Shelley Smith, the topic is especially poignant, not only since the shootings took place not far from where she grew up, but, also because she is the mother of a 13-year-old daughter who is an athlete.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 13, 1995
It seems as though everyone in the known universe wants to watch Sunday's NFC championship game between Dallas and San Francisco.Even NBC's Dick Enberg, who will be calling the Pittsburgh-San Diego AFC title game, has gotten caught up in the NFC swirl."
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 31, 1993
It's not as if there isn't already enough pressure in the Super Bowl, but NBC had to go and add some more.Let's say you're a player, coach or official in today's Titanic Tilt (and if you are, thanks for taking the time to read this on such a busy day). Not only do you have to be concerned about performing at your best in the Ultimate Game, but you also are going to be scrutinized by NBC analyst Bob Trumpy.Trumpy, who ascended to the network's No. 1 analyst spot this season when Bill Walsh returned to coaching, takes up where the old instant replay rule left off. Upon further review, he's not shy to say, you blew it.This is Trumpy's first Super Bowl as a television analyst, though he's worked a couple on radio.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 5, 1992
One gold medal can no longer be considered up for grabs at the Olympic Summer Games from Barcelona -- or maybe it should be tin: the award for Single-handed Outrageously Gratuitous Plugs.And the winner is: Katie Couric of NBC.Whew! On loan to the network's sports coverage from the "Today" program, the co-host (with Dick Enberg) of the morning coverage package seems to have been instructed to let no one remain uninformed where she usually plies her trade.One morning, she offered greetings to "Today" co-host Bryant Gumbel.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 2, 1992
Buckle up that chin strap, hoss, for some mouth-smashin', leg-churnin', touchdown-scorin', pile-drivin', poll-determinin' football. Yessir, that's what we got right here.Eight bowlfuls of college football is more than enough for anyone, certainly for me. So I could have used Keith Jackson for a little pep talk 'round about halftime of the Rose Bowl, when I was fadin' faster 'n a big ole boy who's been runnin' wind sprints in the heat of a Texas August.Still, there was this little matter of who's No. 1, which should have been enough to hold my attention.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 18, 1995
NBC's NFL coverage always seems to be in a state of flux, with adjustments and fine tunings all over the place. In just the past five years, the network has had three different pre-game show hosts, broken in three new studio analysts and switched its No. 1 booth analyst three times.Those normally would be the signs of a network in panic, yet this year's changes -- adding Joe Montana to the studio and teaming Phil Simms and Paul Maguire together with Dick Enberg -- come after NBC won the regular-season race last season and drew its highest pre-game show rating in five years.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | June 18, 1999
In the wake of the April 20 shootings in Littleton, Colo., the nation has been forced to examine the interaction among teen-agerswithin our high schools.The latest "Outside the Lines" special, airing Monday at 7: 30 p.m., takes a look at the gap between high school athletes and the rest of the student body, one of the many themes in the midst of the Columbine tragedy.For lead reporter Shelley Smith, the topic is especially poignant, not only since the shootings took place not far from where she grew up, but, also because she is the mother of a 13-year-old daughter who is an athlete.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 21, 1996
Let the viewer beware: Not everything you'll see during the Olympics will be live.That seems obvious with the sheer volume of activity and a tight NBC telecast schedule, but how will you know what's live and what's taped?You probably won't, not if yesterday's first day of competition is an early indicator. The network did a fair amount of, shall we say, fudging, about what was happening as you watched, and what had already taken place.Swimming and gymnastics commentators only casually, and we suspect, unintentionally, let a few time references slip in, but save for a few things on the schedule, like the swimming finals, most of what aired was on tape.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 18, 1995
NBC's NFL coverage always seems to be in a state of flux, with adjustments and fine tunings all over the place. In just the past five years, the network has had three different pre-game show hosts, broken in three new studio analysts and switched its No. 1 booth analyst three times.Those normally would be the signs of a network in panic, yet this year's changes -- adding Joe Montana to the studio and teaming Phil Simms and Paul Maguire together with Dick Enberg -- come after NBC won the regular-season race last season and drew its highest pre-game show rating in five years.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | August 17, 1995
Deciding which of the networks' play-by-play callers and analysts you like best is a lot like figuring out which side you come down on on the old chicken-and-egg question.Meaning, to determine whether an announcer is a big-time player, you must first decide whether his or her presence at a certain event makes it big or does the event itself give an announcer credibility.For instance, Bob Costas has called an off-season softball game, involving major-league baseball players, for NBC in recent years.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 19, 1995
This weekend had the potential to be a disaster, or at least, very, very uncomfortable for Dick Enberg.Not long after NBC Sports pried away the rights to the U.S. Open golf championships -- men's, women's and seniors -- from ABC with a three-year, $40 million contract, the division's president, Dick Ebersol, thrust Enberg into the hot seat, making him host of NBC's burgeoning golf package.Enberg, a seven-time Emmy winner and three-time national Sportscaster of the Year, was certainly a worthy candidate, having been a part of virtually every major event NBC has had over the past 20 years, from baseball to football to basketball -- NBA and college -- to tennis and the Olympics.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 13, 1995
It seems as though everyone in the known universe wants to watch Sunday's NFC championship game between Dallas and San Francisco.Even NBC's Dick Enberg, who will be calling the Pittsburgh-San Diego AFC title game, has gotten caught up in the NFC swirl."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 19, 1995
This weekend had the potential to be a disaster, or at least, very, very uncomfortable for Dick Enberg.Not long after NBC Sports pried away the rights to the U.S. Open golf championships -- men's, women's and seniors -- from ABC with a three-year, $40 million contract, the division's president, Dick Ebersol, thrust Enberg into the hot seat, making him host of NBC's burgeoning golf package.Enberg, a seven-time Emmy winner and three-time national Sportscaster of the Year, was certainly a worthy candidate, having been a part of virtually every major event NBC has had over the past 20 years, from baseball to football to basketball -- NBA and college -- to tennis and the Olympics.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | January 7, 2000
Verne Lundquist chuckled heartily the other day at the memory of a dinner conversation he had with former Southern California quarterback Pat Haden and NBA great Billy Cunningham at a Masters buffet in 1986 that perfectly summed up his career. Lundquist, who will call Sunday's Maryland-Duke men's basketball game for CBS (Channel 13, 1 p.m.) with Billy Packer, had worked with Haden and Cunningham on the network's college football and basketball packages, respectively, only to see the two of them become lead analysts for those sports.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 31, 1993
It's not as if there isn't already enough pressure in the Super Bowl, but NBC had to go and add some more.Let's say you're a player, coach or official in today's Titanic Tilt (and if you are, thanks for taking the time to read this on such a busy day). Not only do you have to be concerned about performing at your best in the Ultimate Game, but you also are going to be scrutinized by NBC analyst Bob Trumpy.Trumpy, who ascended to the network's No. 1 analyst spot this season when Bill Walsh returned to coaching, takes up where the old instant replay rule left off. Upon further review, he's not shy to say, you blew it.This is Trumpy's first Super Bowl as a television analyst, though he's worked a couple on radio.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 5, 1992
One gold medal can no longer be considered up for grabs at the Olympic Summer Games from Barcelona -- or maybe it should be tin: the award for Single-handed Outrageously Gratuitous Plugs.And the winner is: Katie Couric of NBC.Whew! On loan to the network's sports coverage from the "Today" program, the co-host (with Dick Enberg) of the morning coverage package seems to have been instructed to let no one remain uninformed where she usually plies her trade.One morning, she offered greetings to "Today" co-host Bryant Gumbel.
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