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Dick Ebersol

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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
PALM DESERT, Calif. -- The stage has been set for the biggest high-stakes television poker game in the history of the NFL.The NFL's negotiations for its next TV contract will start later this year against the backdrop of network complaints that they're losing money on the four-year, $3.6 billion contract negotiated in 1990.They say the downturn in the economy has prevented them from charging enough for commercials to offset the rights fees.The networks even negotiated a deal for a two-year extension of the contract at the current average -- $32.5 million per team -- in 1994 and 1995 in exchange for a $224 million rebate this fall, when the contract will jump to about $40 million per team.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
Television has often been called the Great Hype Machine for its tendency to inflate the importance of events and the quality of products that it covers and sells. But in recent weeks, the medium has also become the Great Hope Machine for a nation mired in a dark summer of uncertain economic times. In what are supposed to be the dog days of the TV season when viewership is at its lowest, huge audiences have turned out for the Olympics and the Democratic National Convention. On average, an audience of more than 30 million viewers tuned into the Olympics each night, while some 27.5 million Americans came nightly last week to TV to witness the nomination of the first African-American presidential candidate by a major party.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | June 30, 1999
Marv Albert, who was banished from broadcast sports television nearly two years ago after his conviction on assault charges, will return to NBC Sports and the NBA. The network announced yesterday that Albert, a 20-year NBC veteran, will return to call NBA games next season, as well as boxing in the Summer Olympics next year and men's hockey during the 2002 Winter Olympics. For Albert, who had been wooed by Fox to do NFL games, the chance to return to the sport he has been most closely associated with, basketball, and the network he has been identified with, NBC, were too strong to pass up. "I love the NFL, but, to me, the NBA is everything," Albert said in a national conference call.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Wherever Westminster girls basketball coach Dick Ebersole goes during practice, a yellow sheet of paper follows. On that piece of paper is the types of drills he plans to run his squad through. And beside each notation is the starting and ending times for each drill. For Ebersole, who doesn't shy away from the "basketball junkie" label, that yellow sheet of paper is a blueprint for success. "I'm a stickler for perfection and this is my classroom," he says, referring to the gymnasium.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
Television has often been called the Great Hype Machine for its tendency to inflate the importance of events and the quality of products that it covers and sells. But in recent weeks, the medium has also become the Great Hope Machine for a nation mired in a dark summer of uncertain economic times. In what are supposed to be the dog days of the TV season when viewership is at its lowest, huge audiences have turned out for the Olympics and the Democratic National Convention. On average, an audience of more than 30 million viewers tuned into the Olympics each night, while some 27.5 million Americans came nightly last week to TV to witness the nomination of the first African-American presidential candidate by a major party.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | June 11, 1993
Susan St. James, late of "Kate and Allie" and the great 1979 vampire sendup "Love at First Bite," completes the segue from radio patter to music with flawless timing at her computerized broadcast board."
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
ATLANTA -- In his makeshift office in the bowels of the Olympic broadcast center, NBC Sports President Dick Ebersol tries, with premium cigar in hand, to convince you that he's not a star."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Wherever Westminster girls basketball coach Dick Ebersole goes during practice, a yellow sheet of paper follows. On that piece of paper is the types of drills he plans to run his squad through. And beside each notation is the starting and ending times for each drill. For Ebersole, who doesn't shy away from the "basketball junkie" label, that yellow sheet of paper is a blueprint for success. "I'm a stickler for perfection and this is my classroom," he says, referring to the gymnasium.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | October 21, 1997
By now, it has become passe to lament the lack of backbone among the people who run baseball, but it's way past time that someone in charge of the Grand Old Game put his foot down in terms of its relationship with NBC.Goodness knows, the Peacock Network and its representatives have been walking all over baseball in the past two years:To wit:Before the dissolution of The Baseball Network two years ago, NBC Sports president Dick Ebersol said his network and...
SPORTS
By Kevin B. Blackistone and Kevin B. Blackistone,Dallas Morning News | February 24, 1991
When CBS Inc. started an unprecedented spending spree for sports programs 2 1/2 years ago, it was a broadcasters' market. More fans were tuning in. More advertisers were paying the highest prices for commercial time. And the economy was rolling along.So, CBS had no qualms about paying $243 million for the 1992 Winter Olympics, $300 million for the 1994 Winter Olympics, $1 billion for the college basketball tournament and another $1 billion for major league baseball. The competition followed.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | June 30, 1999
Marv Albert, who was banished from broadcast sports television nearly two years ago after his conviction on assault charges, will return to NBC Sports and the NBA. The network announced yesterday that Albert, a 20-year NBC veteran, will return to call NBA games next season, as well as boxing in the Summer Olympics next year and men's hockey during the 2002 Winter Olympics. For Albert, who had been wooed by Fox to do NFL games, the chance to return to the sport he has been most closely associated with, basketball, and the network he has been identified with, NBC, were too strong to pass up. "I love the NFL, but, to me, the NBA is everything," Albert said in a national conference call.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
ATLANTA -- In his makeshift office in the bowels of the Olympic broadcast center, NBC Sports President Dick Ebersol tries, with premium cigar in hand, to convince you that he's not a star."
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | June 11, 1993
Susan St. James, late of "Kate and Allie" and the great 1979 vampire sendup "Love at First Bite," completes the segue from radio patter to music with flawless timing at her computerized broadcast board."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
PALM DESERT, Calif. -- The stage has been set for the biggest high-stakes television poker game in the history of the NFL.The NFL's negotiations for its next TV contract will start later this year against the backdrop of network complaints that they're losing money on the four-year, $3.6 billion contract negotiated in 1990.They say the downturn in the economy has prevented them from charging enough for commercials to offset the rights fees.The networks even negotiated a deal for a two-year extension of the contract at the current average -- $32.5 million per team -- in 1994 and 1995 in exchange for a $224 million rebate this fall, when the contract will jump to about $40 million per team.
SPORTS
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Tribune Newspapers | October 4, 2009
COPENHAGEN - - That Rio won the 2016 Summer Games is easily understandable. The International Olympic Committee fancies itself a force in global affairs. As in the case of breaking Olympic ground by giving the 2008 Olympics to China, the world's most populous country, Friday's vote was a chance for the IOC to say that by giving the first Olympics to South America, it will have aided the development of Brazil, the most populous country on the continent. That Chicago was eliminated in the first round, as shocking as it seemed, also was understandable, given the IOC's Byzantine internal politics, its fractious relationship with the country whose companies have been its cash cow and the way the host-city election system is structured.
SPORTS
By David Kelly and Alan Abrahamson and David Kelly and Alan Abrahamson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2004
DENVER - A charter jet crashed on takeoff yesterday morning from a small southwest Colorado airport, killing at least two people and injuring NBC Sports chairman Dick Ebersol, his son Charles and an unidentified passenger. The pilot and co-pilot were killed. Another Ebersol son, Teddy, 14, was missing. Police used helicopters to search for him late last night. The seat he had occupied also had not been found. The CL-601 Challenger aircraft crashed at Montrose Regional Airport, just outside the ski resort of Telluride in southwest Colorado.
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