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By Jordan Bartel, b | April 18, 2012
One thing is clear: Americans loved Dick Clark. As soon as the news of Clark's death at 82 of a heart attack reached the world Tuesday afternoon, tributes, thoughts, reflections (and a few loving jokes) flooded Twitter - both from famous folks and regular fans who grew up with the TV mainstay.  Here are some of our favorites so far: • Thanks for everything, Dick Clark. You changed the world of pop music and you will be sorely missed. -- Sony Music Global, @SonyMusicGlobal •  Am still amazed that Dick Clark was only 82...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at the age of 82, is rightfully being hailed as a pioneer of popular culture. And that's fair enough. In the 1950s, '60s and '70s, the reach of his daily"American Bandstand"show and his myriad prime-time special productions was enormous. He was one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, particularly in terms of his perceived ability to deliver a white, suburban, teenage audience to advertisers. His power was all the more valued on Madison Avenue because he was one of TV's first personalities associated with teen viewers at the very time that advertisers first started conceiving of teens as a lucrative audience with disposable income in its own right.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 30, 1995
If they ever gave an award for producing awards shows, Dick Clark would win in a walk.It isn't just that he has the American Music Awards airing live from Los Angeles tonight at 8 on ABC (WMAR, Channel 2). As it turns out, Clark has one awards show a week from now through the end of February."We did the Golden Globes last Saturday," he says, over the phone from his office in Los Angeles. "We'll be doing the Daytime Soaps shortly after this one, then the Daytime Emmys, followed by the Academy of Country Music thing."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | April 18, 2012
One thing is clear: Americans loved Dick Clark. As soon as the news of Clark's death at 82 of a heart attack reached the world Tuesday afternoon, tributes, thoughts, reflections (and a few loving jokes) flooded Twitter - both from famous folks and regular fans who grew up with the TV mainstay.  Here are some of our favorites so far: • Thanks for everything, Dick Clark. You changed the world of pop music and you will be sorely missed. -- Sony Music Global, @SonyMusicGlobal •  Am still amazed that Dick Clark was only 82...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Dick Clark, who died Wednesday at the age of 82, is rightfully being hailed as a pioneer of popular culture. And that's fair enough. In the 1950s, '60s and '70s, the reach of his daily"American Bandstand"show and his myriad prime-time special productions was enormous. He was one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, particularly in terms of his perceived ability to deliver a white, suburban, teenage audience to advertisers. His power was all the more valued on Madison Avenue because he was one of TV's first personalities associated with teen viewers at the very time that advertisers first started conceiving of teens as a lucrative audience with disposable income in its own right.
FEATURES
By Jean Prescott and Jean Prescott,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1991
BILOXI, Miss. -- "Hired hand" is one label you'd never think to apply to Dick Clark, but he insists that's what he'll be when he hosts CBS' prime-time telecast of "The Miss Teen USA Pageant" at 9 tonight live from the Mississippi Coast Coliseum and Convention Center.Madison Square Gardens Productions, not Mr. Clark's own company, is producing the pageant, but "This is a crew of terrifically talented people who run [the pageant] like a well-oiled machine," he says. "I'm just the hired host."
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
There are certain types of people who are drawn to Times Square on New Year's Eve - tourists, college students, frostbite enthusiasts and those who enjoy standing pressed against strangers for hour after excruciating hour. This year you can add one more group to the list - the men who would be Dick Clark. With the world's oldest living teenager sidelined by a stroke, the wannabes are scrambling to show America they can carry Clark's torch, while the networks see a chance to establish new New Year's traditions.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
Seacrest's name, in lights, on New Year's Eve Dick Clark is still Mr. New Year's Eve - but he'll be sharing the title with Ryan Seacrest. Starting this December, Clark's longtime end-of-year special will be called Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest, ABC and dick clark productions has announced. Seacrest will serve as co-host with Clark and as an executive producer on the broadcast for another three years, through the 2010 show ringing in 2011. New Year's Rockin' Eve will mark its 37th year on Dec. 31 and include the customary countdown to midnight from New York City's Times Square.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 31, 1990
Don't think of it as being stuck at home on New Year's Eve. Think of it as a chance to broaden your cultural, musical and sociological horizons.Here are New Year's Eve's TV highlights and lowlights."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 3, 2007
When the name of singer Ronnie Dove is mentioned, the phase "Baltimore's own" usually precedes it. Although born in Herndon, Va., Dove has been part of Baltimore's popular music scene since the mid-1950s. Retirement is not in his vocabulary. He'll be singing tonight in Queenstown at the Bay Country Moose Lodge. In February, he's leading a Caribbean cruise. "I sang all through high school," he said the other day from his home in Pasadena. He credited his grandmother as his musical inspiration.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | December 9, 2008
You don't have to be on 'Idol' to wear 'Idol' jewelry American Idol contestants who don't win on the Fox reality show don't go home empty-handed. Each season, Paula Abdul designs and distributes jewelry for the aspiring singers as a keepsake. Beginning this month, Idol and Abdul fans will be able to buy similar items on HSN. The new HSN Forever Your Girl line, which makes its debut Saturday, also includes handbags and other accessories, with a price range of $29 to $200. Among her newest pieces is a beaded leather cuff bracelet that will go to the female participants in the new season inscribed "reach for the stars."
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
Seacrest's name, in lights, on New Year's Eve Dick Clark is still Mr. New Year's Eve - but he'll be sharing the title with Ryan Seacrest. Starting this December, Clark's longtime end-of-year special will be called Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest, ABC and dick clark productions has announced. Seacrest will serve as co-host with Clark and as an executive producer on the broadcast for another three years, through the 2010 show ringing in 2011. New Year's Rockin' Eve will mark its 37th year on Dec. 31 and include the customary countdown to midnight from New York City's Times Square.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 3, 2007
When the name of singer Ronnie Dove is mentioned, the phase "Baltimore's own" usually precedes it. Although born in Herndon, Va., Dove has been part of Baltimore's popular music scene since the mid-1950s. Retirement is not in his vocabulary. He'll be singing tonight in Queenstown at the Bay Country Moose Lodge. In February, he's leading a Caribbean cruise. "I sang all through high school," he said the other day from his home in Pasadena. He credited his grandmother as his musical inspiration.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
There are certain types of people who are drawn to Times Square on New Year's Eve - tourists, college students, frostbite enthusiasts and those who enjoy standing pressed against strangers for hour after excruciating hour. This year you can add one more group to the list - the men who would be Dick Clark. With the world's oldest living teenager sidelined by a stroke, the wannabes are scrambling to show America they can carry Clark's torch, while the networks see a chance to establish new New Year's traditions.
FEATURES
By David Bauder and David Bauder,AP TELEVISION WRITER | December 27, 2004
NEW YORK -- Let the surfing begin. With an ailing king, two would-be successors and a ubiquitous substitute, New Year's Eve on television has more subplots than a party with three ex-girlfriends. Dick Clark and his "New Year's Rockin' Eve" on ABC has been the go-to party for 32 years, but he'll be away from Times Square Friday as he continues recovering from a stroke. Regis Philbin will fill in for him. NBC is launching its own party show from Rockefeller Center with Carson Daly. Ryan Seacrest, in his third year for Fox, is bringing his show east to New York for the first time.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 20, 2002
Brandy - Special Delivery, MTV's newest reality show documenting the daily life of R&B singer Brandy, proves one thing for sure: The Osbournes made it look a lot easier than it is. Brandy is MTV's effort to capitalize on the unexpected blockbuster success of The Osbournes. But there's a big difference between a camera-conscious 20-something young woman who's eight months pregnant and the foul-mouthed splendor of the first family of heavy metal rock. One thing that Brandy and her self-conscious clan - husband Robert Smith, her manager mother, her interior decorator and someone named "Drain" - need to learn is the value of "show" over "tell."
NEWS
By John Young | December 27, 1999
WACO, Texas -- Forget the computers.We should know the true significance of Y2K by watching Dibble Glacier.If in fact the new year has any significance beyond a few coffee makers spewing calve's blood, the glacier will tell us.For if the world ends at the stroke of 2000, it ends starting right there.And if if does, a lot of people will be hurrying west and rapidly praying.They'll have an hour, eight, 12, to make right with the heavenly landlord, or buy time racing the sun before the sifter separates wheat from chaff.
FEATURES
By Teresa Gubbins and Teresa Gubbins,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 20, 2002
Brandy - Special Delivery, MTV's newest reality show documenting the daily life of R&B singer Brandy, proves one thing for sure: The Osbournes made it look a lot easier than it is. Brandy is MTV's effort to capitalize on the unexpected blockbuster success of The Osbournes. But there's a big difference between a camera-conscious 20-something young woman who's eight months pregnant and the foul-mouthed splendor of the first family of heavy metal rock. One thing that Brandy and her self-conscious clan - husband Robert Smith, her manager mother, her interior decorator and someone named "Drain" - need to learn is the value of "show" over "tell."
NEWS
By John Young | December 27, 1999
WACO, Texas -- Forget the computers.We should know the true significance of Y2K by watching Dibble Glacier.If in fact the new year has any significance beyond a few coffee makers spewing calve's blood, the glacier will tell us.For if the world ends at the stroke of 2000, it ends starting right there.And if if does, a lot of people will be hurrying west and rapidly praying.They'll have an hour, eight, 12, to make right with the heavenly landlord, or buy time racing the sun before the sifter separates wheat from chaff.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 3, 1999
The NAACP will announce today that it will hold an industry-wide hearing in Los Angeles on the lack of diversity on network television shows, a spokesman for the civil rights organization said yesterday.The announcement will be made at a press conference in New York, where Kweisi Mfume, president of the organization, will describe the NAACP response to the matter.While actions could eventually include selected boycotting, the NAACP will not call for a full boycott of network television during the November "sweeps" ratings period, which starts tomorrow, according to John C. White, a spokesman for the NAACP.
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