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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2005
Tea Leoni combines the talents of a crazy comic with those of a gorgeously bent straight gal. She and Jim Carrey, Mr. Malleable, appear made for each other. But they're not the match of your dreams as the storybook man and wife turned suburban Bonnie and Clyde in Fun With Dick and Jane. Whenever they cut loose here - not often enough - they detonate theater-quaking belly laughs. During one modest heist at a cafe, Dick distracts Jane with the prospect of low-fat muffins. She takes a headfirst plunge over a counter, landing in a sprawl off-screen.
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By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
The Anne Arundel County Council postponed its vote on a bill that would make changes to legislation regarding roadside and produce stands, after one councilmember expressed concern over how the businesses would affect their neighbors. The bill, dubbed the "Dick and Jane" bill by co-sponsor Edward R. Reilly, was drafted to "protect existing long-term businesses in the county," Reilly said, particularly the roadside stand Dick and Jane's in Harwood. "In my district they are very supportive to keep this 17-year location open and serving the neighbors," said Reilly, who represents the southern part of the county.
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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
IN EDUSPEAK, it's called the basal reader. It's been a staple of elementary education for generations. And it's going the way of the Chesapeake Bay oyster. You can still find basals in public and private schools, and textbook publishers still peddle them in colorful packages, accompanied these days by a plethora of supplements - workbooks, CD-ROMs, even Internet Web sites. But the place to look for basals in many schools is the storage closet. The basal reader is - supposedly - the foundation of schoolhouse reading.
FEATURES
October 28, 2006
Critic's Pick--A well-to-do couple loses it all, turning to crime to pay the bills in Fun With Dick and Jane (9 p.m.-10:35 p.m., Starz), with Tea Leoni (above).
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
SPOT IS UP and running again, and so we can join Dick and Jane in uttering the most famous sentence in 20th-century American schoolbooks: "See Spot run!"Yes, yes, the family's back after an absence of three decades -- those wholesome, winsome stars of the first-grade "basals" that helped teach 85 million Americans to read over a span of nearly 40 years.No, no, Dick and Jane aren't back in the classroom, where they were done in by phonics and cultural diversity about 1965. What's happened is that those embodiments of a near-perfect middle-class suburban life have been caught up in the wave of boomer nostalgia.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
When 200 actors auditioned for the latest production by Howard Community College's Student-Alumni Arts group, they faced an unusual challenge: The show had not been written. It was up to the people who were chosen to create the play, under the direction of Susan G. Kramer, using a method called rehearsed improvisation. "It's a very different process," said Kramer, artistic director for Student-Alumni Arts. Over three months, 13 ensemble members improvised dozens of scenes. Then the group chose those that worked best and rehearsed them to create the basic outline.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
OVER THE PAST couple of weeks, we've watched three reading textbook publishers pitch their wares to Baltimore school officials.It's a wonder!All parents should get a taste of a textbook sales routine, especially if they grew up with Dick and Jane, those dull siblings of midcentury readers who got their jollies watching their dog run and visiting grandfather's farm.Dick and Jane went out of business, but not before they were said to have ruined many of us for life because the readers in which they resided didn't have enough phonics.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
When 200 actors auditioned for the latest production by Howard Community College's Student-Alumni Arts group, they faced an unusual challenge: The show had not been written. It was up to the people who were chosen to create the play, under the direction of Susan G. Kramer, using a method called rehearsed improvisation. "It's a very different process," said Kramer, artistic director for Student-Alumni Arts. Over three months, 13 ensemble members improvised dozens of scenes. Then the group chose those that worked best and rehearsed them to create the basic outline.
FEATURES
October 28, 2006
Critic's Pick--A well-to-do couple loses it all, turning to crime to pay the bills in Fun With Dick and Jane (9 p.m.-10:35 p.m., Starz), with Tea Leoni (above).
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 23, 2005
Hollywood studios have become so desperate for material that they've begun remaking middling or just plain terrible movies - not only genre films like The Amityville Horror and Assault on Precinct 13 but odder ducks like the political comedy Fun With Dick and Jane. Too often the remakes don't improve on the original movies: They magnify the first films' shortcomings. Fun With Dick and Jane is a socially conscious farce about an unemployed upper-middle-class couple turned suburban Bonnie and Clyde.
FEATURES
January 27, 2006
Capsules are by critics Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Brokeback Mountain -- stars Heath Ledger as Ennis del Mar, the ranch-hand lover of small-time rodeo-man Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal). After their first summer of love, Ennis and Jack start families with their respective wives (Michelle Williams as Alma and Anne Hathaway as Lureen) but reconnect after four years. Soon they're taking semiannual "fishing trips" and comparing notes on lives of quiet desperation.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 23, 2005
Hollywood studios have become so desperate for material that they've begun remaking middling or just plain terrible movies - not only genre films like The Amityville Horror and Assault on Precinct 13 but odder ducks like the political comedy Fun With Dick and Jane. Too often the remakes don't improve on the original movies: They magnify the first films' shortcomings. Fun With Dick and Jane is a socially conscious farce about an unemployed upper-middle-class couple turned suburban Bonnie and Clyde.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2005
Tea Leoni combines the talents of a crazy comic with those of a gorgeously bent straight gal. She and Jim Carrey, Mr. Malleable, appear made for each other. But they're not the match of your dreams as the storybook man and wife turned suburban Bonnie and Clyde in Fun With Dick and Jane. Whenever they cut loose here - not often enough - they detonate theater-quaking belly laughs. During one modest heist at a cafe, Dick distracts Jane with the prospect of low-fat muffins. She takes a headfirst plunge over a counter, landing in a sprawl off-screen.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 18, 2005
NEW YORK -- Tea Leoni isn't one of those actors who becomes whatever she is playing. But roles tend to rub off on her a bit. "It does affect you," she says, her sky blue eyes widening for emphasis. That residual effect is one of the reasons she was so happy to act opposite Jim Carrey in Fun With Dick and Jane. In the comedy, opening Wednesday, they play an upper-middle-class couple who, after Dick's sleazy boss absconds with all the company's funds, resort to robbery to maintain their lavish lifestyle.
FEATURES
December 9, 2005
THE QUESTION You know you've felt it: A sneaking suspicion after watching a movie trailer that you've just seen the whole film. Or heard all the best jokes. So what's the point in paying to see the movie later? For example, the seemingly endless preview for Casanova, which opens Jan. 6. (It includes more than a fleeting glimpse of one of the film's climactic scenes.) We wonder: Why can't the producers of trailers add a little more mystery and subtract a few punchlines? What do you think are the worst recent offenders?
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
When 200 actors auditioned for the latest production by Howard Community College's Student-Alumni Arts group, they faced an unusual challenge: The show had not been written. It was up to the people who were chosen to create the play, under the direction of Susan G. Kramer, using a method called rehearsed improvisation. "It's a very different process," said Kramer, artistic director for Student-Alumni Arts. Over three months, 13 ensemble members improvised dozens of scenes. Then the group chose those that worked best and rehearsed them to create the basic outline.
FEATURES
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Arizona Republic | July 22, 1993
The monotonous Dick and Jane books that helped teach baby boomers to read are now considered by many educators to be a big B-O-R-E.But while Dick, Jane, Spot and Puff may be long gone from most elementary school classrooms, they are hardly forgotten.Nostalgia-crazed grown-ups have turned the primers into hot items, according to book dealers, libraries and the original publisher."From our contacts with the general public, we're finding that they're becoming collectors' items," says Nancie Mitchell, a librarian at Scott, Foresman and Co. of Glenview, Ill., which published the textbooks from 1930 until 1965.
NEWS
July 10, 1998
Sheldon Tromberg, a former college instructor and Washington resident, died Sunday of heart failure at home in Richmond, Calif. He was 68.Mr. Tromberg, who moved to Richmond in 1993, had lived in Washington for 40 years and taught motion-picture screen-writing and business at Georgetown University and the Corcoran School of Art.From the early 1960s to the mid-1970s, he owned Box Office Attractions, a motion-picture distribution company.The Brooklyn, N.Y. native earned a bachelor's degree from Columbia University and a master's degree in business from the University of Oklahoma.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
When 200 actors auditioned for the latest production by Howard Community College's Student-Alumni Arts group, they faced an unusual challenge: The show had not been written. It was up to the people who were chosen to create the play, under the direction of Susan G. Kramer, using a method called rehearsed improvisation. "It's a very different process," said Kramer, artistic director for Student-Alumni Arts. Over three months, 13 ensemble members improvised dozens of scenes. Then the group chose those that worked best and rehearsed them to create the basic outline.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
IN EDUSPEAK, it's called the basal reader. It's been a staple of elementary education for generations. And it's going the way of the Chesapeake Bay oyster. You can still find basals in public and private schools, and textbook publishers still peddle them in colorful packages, accompanied these days by a plethora of supplements - workbooks, CD-ROMs, even Internet Web sites. But the place to look for basals in many schools is the storage closet. The basal reader is - supposedly - the foundation of schoolhouse reading.
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