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NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Dennis O'Brien and Andrea Siegel and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
The state's highest court temporarily suspended the law license of Towson lawyer Robert A. DiCicco yesterday, saying he was sloppy in the handling of his law practice funds. The Court of Appeals did not find that he had intentionally misappropriated clients' money from 1997 to 1999, but said he was negligent in handling accounts and did not keep separate client trust accounts as required. The indefinite suspension, however, could be brief. It allows DiCicco, a lawyer for nearly 38 years, to seek readmission after 90 days.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
With fall's youth soccer season starting up, Tony DiCicco and Colleen Hacker have two words of advice for coaches of female players: Play nice. "You have to ease them into it," DiCicco says of grade-school girls. "They may not be ready to mix it up on the field. You have to make it OK for them to compete and dominate." DiCicco and Hacker know a thing or two about getting female soccer players to perform. DiCicco coached the U.S. Women's National Team that won the 1996 Olympic gold medal and 1999 World Cup and now serves as commissioner of the WUSA, the women's professional soccer league.
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FEATURES
By John Powers and John Powers,BOSTON GLOBE | June 24, 1999
The coach from Mars is talking about communicating with players from Venus. "There is a different approach," Tony DiCicco says. "You can't be an in-your-face type coach with women. You have to recognize the differences."The 50-year-old DiCicco, who has directed the U.S. women's soccer team to 93 victories and an Olympic gold medal in five years, has collected enough data -- both empirical and anecdotal -- for a graduate-level seminar on gender subtleties.Female players take criticism much more personally than males do, DiCicco has observed, even if it's not directed at them individually.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Dennis O'Brien and Andrea Siegel and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
The state's highest court temporarily suspended the law license of Towson lawyer Robert A. DiCicco yesterday, saying he was sloppy in the handling of his law practice funds. The Court of Appeals did not find that he had intentionally misappropriated clients' money from 1997 to 1999, but said he was negligent in handling accounts and did not keep separate client trust accounts as required. The indefinite suspension, however, could be brief. It allows DiCicco, a lawyer for nearly 38 years, to seek readmission after 90 days.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
With fall's youth soccer season starting up, Tony DiCicco and Colleen Hacker have two words of advice for coaches of female players: Play nice. "You have to ease them into it," DiCicco says of grade-school girls. "They may not be ready to mix it up on the field. You have to make it OK for them to compete and dominate." DiCicco and Hacker know a thing or two about getting female soccer players to perform. DiCicco coached the U.S. Women's National Team that won the 1996 Olympic gold medal and 1999 World Cup and now serves as commissioner of the WUSA, the women's professional soccer league.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
Columbia-based homebuilder Ryland Group Inc. and a dissatisfied homeowner who had been picketing the company's headquarters have settled the lawsuits they had brought against each another, the attorney for the homeowner said Friday.The lawyer, Robert DiCicco of Towson, said the out-of-court agreement barred him from disclosing details of the settlement, reached Thursday, between Ryland and Baltimore County resident Mark Kukucka.Mr. Kukucka said he, too, could not comment on the agreement.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Tony DiCicco, still adjusting to life as a soccer guru, was patiently sharing his views on matters such as the future of the women's game, his famous players' strike over $2,000 a month and being dad to four sons instead of suitcase dweller. "Aren't you going to ask me about the convention?" he finally interjected from his home in Connecticut. Sure, coach. The National Soccer Coaches Association of America opens its 53rd convention in Baltimore today, and DiCicco will be in town -- as a coach apart.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
CRYSTAL CITY, Va. -- The Americans worked out and then were to watch some foreign films together -- of German women playing soccer.The Germans took yesterday off, some sleeping into the afternoon. They had a date for dinner across the Potomac River and exploring Georgetown.Thus two teams prepared for tonight's 7 o'clock Women's World Cup quarterfinal at Jack Kent Cooke Stadium in Landover between the favored, 3-0-0 U.S. team and Germany, generally considered Europe's second best despite its hardly fearsome 1-0-2 group-play finish.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Thori Staples lost her starting position on the U.S. women's national soccer team in training camp last fall, when she was struggling and veteran Brandi Chastain was moved from midfield to defense.Now Staples, a former Joppatowne High and North Carolina State star, seems in danger of losing out on a chance to be part of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team. Evidence of that came in yesterday's game against China at RFK Stadium.After playing a combined 54 minutes in the first two games of the three-game U.S. Women's Cup, Staples didn't leave the sidelines during her team's 1-0 victory yesterday.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
Tony DiCicco, still adjusting to life as a soccer guru, was patiently sharing his views on matters such as the future of the women's game, his famous players' strike over $2,000 a month and being dad to four sons instead of suitcase dweller. "Aren't you going to ask me about the convention?" he finally interjected from his home in Connecticut. Sure, coach. The National Soccer Coaches Association of America opens its 53rd convention in Baltimore today, and DiCicco will be in town -- as a coach apart.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1999
CLAREMONT, Calif. -- It is safe to say that no one from the cast of "On the Waterfront" had ever watched the women's national soccer team practice until Karl Malden showed up yesterday, along with about 2,000 members of The Sopranos, those adolescent warblers in full-throated Mia mania.The players needed a police escort in and out of practice at Pomona College, lest they be trampled by the Nickelodeon mob.A trio of cops even escorted reporters from one end of the field to the other, a sign either that the Women's World Cup has begun to take itself too seriously or Southern California's crime rate is suddenly less threatening than that of Mayberry RFD.Judging from the shrieking chorus, most people had come to see forward Mia Hamm and to get her to sign her name to anything.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
CRYSTAL CITY, Va. -- The Americans worked out and then were to watch some foreign films together -- of German women playing soccer.The Germans took yesterday off, some sleeping into the afternoon. They had a date for dinner across the Potomac River and exploring Georgetown.Thus two teams prepared for tonight's 7 o'clock Women's World Cup quarterfinal at Jack Kent Cooke Stadium in Landover between the favored, 3-0-0 U.S. team and Germany, generally considered Europe's second best despite its hardly fearsome 1-0-2 group-play finish.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
FEATURES
By John Powers and John Powers,BOSTON GLOBE | June 24, 1999
The coach from Mars is talking about communicating with players from Venus. "There is a different approach," Tony DiCicco says. "You can't be an in-your-face type coach with women. You have to recognize the differences."The 50-year-old DiCicco, who has directed the U.S. women's soccer team to 93 victories and an Olympic gold medal in five years, has collected enough data -- both empirical and anecdotal -- for a graduate-level seminar on gender subtleties.Female players take criticism much more personally than males do, DiCicco has observed, even if it's not directed at them individually.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
The 20 women chosen to wear America's colors in quest of the third Women's World Cup, the final round of which opens 31 days from today in East Rutherford, N.J., were named yesterday in Chicago.Coach Tony DiCicco's roster includes 13 players from his Olympic gold medalists three years ago, as well as six who helped the Americans win the first women's world championship in 1991.But it's no stand-pat roster. DiCicco has blended in eight young players, who will get to experience the intensity and glamour of competing in what, off ticket sales and world TV commitments, will be history's most widely watched women's sports event.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
FAIRFAX, Va. -- U.S. women's soccer coach Tony DiCicco prattles at times over the importance of what he calls "personality players."He means "stars." Such as Mia Hamm, possibly the most widely publicized No. 9 in sports today, and Michelle Akers, the chronic fatigue syndrome-coper, oldest U.S. player and legend in the sport. Such as Julie Foudy, the chattiest midfielder who ever rejected admission to Stanford's medical school and punctuated it by kicking a doc for a beer maker's Women's World Cup TV ad.Not that she's anonymous, but the name Brandi Chastain doesn't jump to mind as fast when DiCicco turns cliche-monger.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1995
McDonogh's Laurie Schwoy made an impressive showing in her first experience at the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team camp last week."She's an absolute talent," said national team coach Tony DiCicco. "She definitely has it. She was competing against some top-level collegiate stars and she did very well."A highly-driven athlete, Schwoy is a three-time All-American, two-time All-Metro Player of the Year and has received a full scholarship to play at perennial powerhouse North Carolina next fall.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Thori Staples lost her starting position on the U.S. women's national soccer team in training camp last fall, when she was struggling and veteran Brandi Chastain was moved from midfield to defense.Now Staples, a former Joppatowne High and North Carolina State star, seems in danger of losing out on a chance to be part of the 1996 U.S. Olympic team. Evidence of that came in yesterday's game against China at RFK Stadium.After playing a combined 54 minutes in the first two games of the three-game U.S. Women's Cup, Staples didn't leave the sidelines during her team's 1-0 victory yesterday.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1995
McDonogh's Laurie Schwoy made an impressive showing in her first experience at the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team camp last week."She's an absolute talent," said national team coach Tony DiCicco. "She definitely has it. She was competing against some top-level collegiate stars and she did very well."A highly-driven athlete, Schwoy is a three-time All-American, two-time All-Metro Player of the Year and has received a full scholarship to play at perennial powerhouse North Carolina next fall.
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