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Dianne Feinstein

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December 4, 2005
Dec. 4-- 1816: James Monroe of Virginia was elected the fifth U.S. president. 1978: San Francisco elected its first female mayor, Dianne Feinstein.
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NEWS
November 22, 2009
ABC's 'This Week' Sens. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., and Ben Nelson, D-Neb.; Reps. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla. 9 a.m.:WMDT (Channel 47), 10 a.m.: WJLA (Channel 7), 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) CBS' 'Face the Nation' Sens. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., and Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. 10:30 a.m.:WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) CNN's 'State of the Union' Sens. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
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NEWS
November 22, 2009
ABC's 'This Week' Sens. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., and Ben Nelson, D-Neb.; Reps. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla. 9 a.m.:WMDT (Channel 47), 10 a.m.: WJLA (Channel 7), 10:30 a.m.: WMAR (Channel 2) CBS' 'Face the Nation' Sens. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., and Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. 10:30 a.m.:WUSA (Channel 9) and WJZ (Channel 13) CNN's 'State of the Union' Sens. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005
Dec. 4-- 1816: James Monroe of Virginia was elected the fifth U.S. president. 1978: San Francisco elected its first female mayor, Dianne Feinstein.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The broken-down 103rd Congress headed home yesterday to explain itself to voters after Senate Democrats claimed a last, sweet victory that might help at least one of their number in a dicey re-election bid.On its last roll call before adjourning, the Senate voted 68-23 to finally halt a Republican filibuster that had been blocking for weeks approval of a popular measure aimed at protecting 6.6 million acres of California desert.President Clinton called the desert bill vote yesterday "a clear-cut victory" not only for Californians, but "everyone who cares about this nation's natural resources."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 30, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The Ross Perot phenomenon is supposed to convey the message that the voters are fed up with politics as usual, including its negative and destructive tone. But that message obviously is not being taken to heart in the primaries for California's two U.S. Senate seats.The most outrageous commercial yet is one being run by state controller Gray Davis against former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein in their contest for the Democratic nomination to fill the two years remaining in the term that Pete Wilson vacated when he became governor.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 5, 1990
WASHINGTON -- As the California governor's race goes, so goes the 1990 election.That Republican claim sounds like a ploy to delay any downbeat analysis until most of the country is asleep in bed tomorrow. But there may be something to it.For one thing, capturing California, the biggest prize of 1990, would mean that the year was not a total loss for the party that grabs it. For another, winning California might be necessary to prevent a GOP wipeout in three key Sun Belt gubernatorial contests.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
If the polls are right, the election of a Democrat, Bill Clinton, will end the partisan standoff that has paralyzed Washington for years. Even the most optimistic Republicans now concede that Democrats will retain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate in next month's election.But exactly what the next two years in Washington will be like depends heavily on precisely who wins in the election this fall of 435 House members and 36 senators.Will Democrats keep enough seats to maintain a moderate-to-liberal working majority in the House?
NEWS
By ANNE TAYLOR FLEMING | July 22, 1992
Los Angeles -- Soon after the historic California primary put two women in Senate contention and 18 women among the finalists for the state's 52 congressional seats, I found myself amid a celebratory sea of women at a Los Angeles fund-raiser for State Treasurer Kathleen Brown, feeling a little grumpy around the edges.But why? After all, it had been a long haul for women in politics. It was time to celebrate, as a quartet of female luncheon speakers clearly aimed to do and as numbers of women did again at the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- In the current blame game over the Bush administration's failure to detect the Sept. 11 attacks in advance, there's a certain amount of unreality going on. For openers, what were the Democrats blaming the president for? Not, certainly, for knowing such a devastating attack was coming against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and not doing anything about it. Only the most jaundiced would believe any such thing. It wasn't necessary, therefore, for the president to make that steely-eyed, jut-jawed declaration before the television cameras that had he known what was coming, he would have done everything within his power to prevent it. Of course he would have.
NEWS
By Kristina Herrndobler and Kristina Herrndobler,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Gun control activists plan to file a lawsuit today alleging that the Bush administration has failed to enforce a ban on the production and sale of semiautomatic weapons, one of several efforts by advocates to raise awareness that the assault weapons ban is set to expire this fall. Advocates are trying to convince lawmakers to extend the ban, but experts say it is unlikely the Republican-controlled Congress will bring it to a vote in an election year. The 1994 law banned 19 specific semi-automatic assault weapons and copies of those guns.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 22, 2002
WASHINGTON -- In the current blame game over the Bush administration's failure to detect the Sept. 11 attacks in advance, there's a certain amount of unreality going on. For openers, what were the Democrats blaming the president for? Not, certainly, for knowing such a devastating attack was coming against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and not doing anything about it. Only the most jaundiced would believe any such thing. It wasn't necessary, therefore, for the president to make that steely-eyed, jut-jawed declaration before the television cameras that had he known what was coming, he would have done everything within his power to prevent it. Of course he would have.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2000
WASHINGTON -- This year's Senate elections seem likely to produce modest Democratic gains, but too small to help the party take control from the Republicans, leaders of both parties agree. Both sides will be watching the outcome closely, because it will probably set the stage for an even more intense fight for control in 2002. Democrats see great opportunities then, when 20 seats held by Republicans will be on the ballot, compared with 13 held by Democrats. In this year's races, 10 of the 19 Republican seats being contested are at various degrees of risk, compared with five of the 14 Democratic seats.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
Crippled cityThe residential and office explosions of growth in the counties around Baltimore have crippled this city terribly. Small and large businesses are flocking to the county at an alarming rate.Why? Cheaper space in the counties.Loose zoning policies still make it a lot cheaper to cut up a farm and build an office building than to renovate an old building downtown.Maybe the city of Baltimore should get more active in the zoning issues of the counties?The more restrictive the county zoning is, the more economic pressure there will be for builders to follow the lead of companies like Struever Bros.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 28, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- He's back. He's busy. And he wants redemption.Lesser operatives might have crumbled after such a spectacular collision with ignominy. They might have shriveled up and died, metaphorically anyway, to find themselves consigned to the status of a David Letterman joke. Saddled with labels like "liar" and "racist" -- his own dark vision of how his post-New Jersey obituary might read -- others might have limped off to the Sahara of corporate communications, the political junkie's notion of hell itself.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The broken-down 103rd Congress headed home yesterday to explain itself to voters after Senate Democrats claimed a last, sweet victory that might help at least one of their number in a dicey re-election bid.On its last roll call before adjourning, the Senate voted 68-23 to finally halt a Republican filibuster that had been blocking for weeks approval of a popular measure aimed at protecting 6.6 million acres of California desert.President Clinton called the desert bill vote yesterday "a clear-cut victory" not only for Californians, but "everyone who cares about this nation's natural resources."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2000
WASHINGTON -- This year's Senate elections seem likely to produce modest Democratic gains, but too small to help the party take control from the Republicans, leaders of both parties agree. Both sides will be watching the outcome closely, because it will probably set the stage for an even more intense fight for control in 2002. Democrats see great opportunities then, when 20 seats held by Republicans will be on the ballot, compared with 13 held by Democrats. In this year's races, 10 of the 19 Republican seats being contested are at various degrees of risk, compared with five of the 14 Democratic seats.
NEWS
By Kristina Herrndobler and Kristina Herrndobler,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Gun control activists plan to file a lawsuit today alleging that the Bush administration has failed to enforce a ban on the production and sale of semiautomatic weapons, one of several efforts by advocates to raise awareness that the assault weapons ban is set to expire this fall. Advocates are trying to convince lawmakers to extend the ban, but experts say it is unlikely the Republican-controlled Congress will bring it to a vote in an election year. The 1994 law banned 19 specific semi-automatic assault weapons and copies of those guns.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | February 24, 1993
Chicago. -- Not many people paid attention to the fate of Ricky Ray Rector during last year's presidential campaign. Only the left tried, without much success, to stir up interest in the black man with a damaged brain who was executed in Arkansas a year ago while Bill Clinton's campaign seemed to be foundering in the Gennifer Flowers scandal. Occasionally one read in The Village Voice or The Nation that Rector was the victim sacrificed to Bill Clinton's ambition.Marshall Frady has written a very long, very good, very dramatic account of Rector's violent life and zombie-like death in the current New Yorker.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
If the polls are right, the election of a Democrat, Bill Clinton, will end the partisan standoff that has paralyzed Washington for years. Even the most optimistic Republicans now concede that Democrats will retain control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate in next month's election.But exactly what the next two years in Washington will be like depends heavily on precisely who wins in the election this fall of 435 House members and 36 senators.Will Democrats keep enough seats to maintain a moderate-to-liberal working majority in the House?
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