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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Long-time ABC correspondent Lynn Sherr and I joined Howie Kurtz for some analysis Sunday on the change last week at the ABC News anchor desk involving Diane Sawyer, David Muir and George Stephanopoulos. I really like what Sherr had to say about it being so important for the person who is first in anything "to not mess up. " And Kurtz is right about where the money and power (what's left of it anyway) is in network news.   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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By Robert B. Reich | July 2, 2014
What's the reason for the tempest in the teapot of Hillary and Bill Clinton's personal finances? It can't be about how much money they have. Wealth has never disqualified someone from high office. Several of the nation's greatest presidents, who came to office with vast fortunes -- John F. Kennedy, Franklin D. Roosevelt and his fifth cousin, Teddy -- notably improved the lives of ordinary Americans. The tempest can't be about Hillary Clinton's veracity. It may have been a stretch for her to say she and her husband were "dead broke" when they left the White House, as she told ABC's Diane Sawyer.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1999
Out with the new, and in with the old.That's the plan, as of yesterday anyway, at ABC News for reviving its troubled "Good Morning America" show.In a major overhaul, two anchors and an executive producer were dumped yesterday to be replaced on an interim basis starting Jan. 18 by former "GMA" host Charles Gibson and Diane Sawyer, of the "20/20" newsmagazine. Sawyer's return to mornings, where she worked as co-host of "CBS This Morning" from 1981 to 1984, is one of the more surprising turns taken of late by the revolving chairs at the morning show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Long-time ABC correspondent Lynn Sherr and I joined Howie Kurtz for some analysis Sunday on the change last week at the ABC News anchor desk involving Diane Sawyer, David Muir and George Stephanopoulos. I really like what Sherr had to say about it being so important for the person who is first in anything "to not mess up. " And Kurtz is right about where the money and power (what's left of it anyway) is in network news.   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | January 14, 1997
IN THE EARLY DAYS of my newspaper career my mother often lamented the fact that I was not a television journalist."Can't you do what you do on TV where everyone would see you?" she asked often and in front of others. "You have such a pleasant face."I would wince and, skipping over the description of my face as "pleasant," I would respond the same way every time she asked: "Mother, I can't keep my hair set that long."Well, I have a new haircut and I am thinking of a career change.Diane Sawyer is about to sign a new contract that will pay her $10 million a year or more and I can do short, blond and limp, too, if that's the kind of hair it takes to make it on network television these days.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | December 3, 1992
Diane Sawyer and "PrimeTime Live" have won the Fergie chase. They'll get the first big TV interview with Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, since her headline-emblazing split last summer from Prince Andrew and her topless kissing romp with her financial adviser.The interview, which will air next Thursday on "PrimeTime Live," was conducted yesterday in Warsaw, where Fergie is visiting cancer-stricken children.NBC's Maria Shriver had a long-standing commitment from Fergie to do an interview, but Ms. Shriver was unable to fly overseas at this time because she's recovering from viral meningitis.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | March 18, 1991
The word is that CBS White House ace Lesley Stahl will replace maternity-bound correspondent Meredith Vieira on CBS's "60 Minutes." And Linda Ellerbee, for one, couldn't be happier."
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 16, 1994
They came to praise Nicole Brown Simpson last night. Of course, they had buried her months before.Her mother and father and three sisters went on TV to tell Nicole Simpson's side of the story. Much of it was predictably warm and fuzzy, complete with home movies of Nicole as a baby, Nicole in a red tutu, Nicole as the homecoming princess.Then came the rest of the story.Juditha Brown, Nicole's mother, was in tears three minutes into the show.But none of the story, no matter how ugly, was shocking.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
Diane Sawyer originally planned to interview Michael Jackson and Lisa Marie Presley live from the Temple of Dendur Egyptian exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. But the museum said no for security reasons, so tonight's heavily promoted talk is taking place on an MGM sound stage in Los Angeles.* "Special Edition: Reflections on Prejudice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Actress Anna Deavere Smith, currently starring in "Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn, and Other Identities" at Center Stage, joins host Ron Shapiro and a studio panel of city and county students to talk about racism.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 20, 1991
The woman who accused William Kennedy Smith of rape allowed herself to be identified on ABC-TV's "Primetime Live" in an interview with Diane Sawyer.In America, in 1991, this is called prime-time entertainment. At times, it was embarrassing to watch. The question is: Who's to blame.We can talk all kinds of high-minded journalistic talk about victims' rights and privacy, but last night on television it was not about that. It was about titillation, psycho-drama, the television news industry's preposterous sense of self-importance and even further blurring of the notions of public and private.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
It used to be that change at a network anchor desk was huge news. Now, with all the fragmentation, not so much. Anchor changes like the ones announced at ABC News today are a real barometer of how far network news has sunk in prestige and power -- though the networks are still making money off the nightly newscasts as they crawl on bloody knees to the media boneyard. ABC News announced today that it is shuffling its anchor desk. Diane Sawyer, who helped make "World News" a more aggressive operation and led a ratings surge that overtook Brian Williams and his sinking NBC News ship, is leaving the anchor desk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
After spending 15 hours Friday locked on coverage of the manhunt in Boston, here are my picks for the highs, lows and deeper media stories of this remarkable day and night. The best moment belonged to Diane Sawyer and ABC News for a phone interview Friday night with George Pizzuto, a next-door neighbor to the man who discovered a wounded and bloody Dzhokhar Tsarnaev lying under a tarp in a boat in his backyard and called police. The interview started at 8:02 p.m., and was the first clear explanation of how the police found the 19-year-old bombing suspect in Watertown Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
Ron Howard has made his best movie with Frost/Nixon, an electric political drama with a skin-prickling immediacy. Howard and his screenwriter, Peter Morgan (who also wrote the original play) have the wit to portray British TV interviewer David Frost (Michael Sheen) and disgraced former President Richard Nixon (Frank Langella) as David and Goliath. Frost's slingshot is a weapon that proved deadly to Nixon once before, during the Nixon/Kennedy TV debates: the all-seeing eye of the close-up lens.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 5, 2008
ABC News is clearing its slate of prime-time entertainment shows tonight to make room for Charles Gibson, Diane Sawyer and live wall-to-wall political coverage. On CBS, Katie Couric and newly hired political analysts such as Joe Trippi will supplant action-adventure drama, while NBC pre-empts one of its highest-rated series for Brian Williams and Tim Russert. With 24 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday, the networks - bolstered by rising interest in the primaries - have suddenly become super-serious about covering presidential politics.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | January 15, 2007
NEW YORK -- At ABC News, the talk lately has centered on one question: What's Diane going to do? After a year in which the television news industry absorbed Katie Couric's move to CBS Evening News and Meredith Vieira's jump to NBC's Today show, Diane Sawyer is poised to trigger more upheaval as she considers whether to continue her eight-year run on Good Morning America. The departure of Sawyer - perhaps the news division's biggest luminary - would be a substantial blow to GMA, the most profitable program at ABC News and a show on which she has considerable influence.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 10, 2002
The face of 50 has changed since most of us were kids. Heck, the whole philosophy of 50 has changed. "There's so much more joy associated with this period of life now," says Connie Collins, a contributing editor at More magazine, a publication for women between 40 and 60. "In our mothers' generation, many women felt life was over at 50. The children were grown, and there was nothing left to do. But for this generation, life is just beginning. We're experiencing a rebirth." This year, about 3.5 million baby boomers will turn 50, some fairly famous female mugs among them -- supermodel Beverly Johnson, author Amy Tan, former gymnast Cathy Rigby -- so Collins and the other editors at More decided to develop a book that showed the new look and attitude of the Big Five-O, Fifty Celebrate Fifty (Meredith Books; $30)
FEATURES
By Susan Stewart and Susan Stewart,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 7, 1994
There's a bright side to everything, even the decline and fall of network news-show standards. The August Vanity Fair features a hilarious story about bagging the big ones: the lengths to which TV anchors go to snare interviews with caning victims, felonious figure skaters and other "geeks of the week" whose tawdry tales constitute current events for many TV watchers.The anchors are million-dollar women -- Walters-Chung-Sawyer-Pauley-Couric. Their spiritual leader is Barbara Walters. Connie Chung (CBS' "Eye to Eye")
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 5, 2008
ABC News is clearing its slate of prime-time entertainment shows tonight to make room for Charles Gibson, Diane Sawyer and live wall-to-wall political coverage. On CBS, Katie Couric and newly hired political analysts such as Joe Trippi will supplant action-adventure drama, while NBC pre-empts one of its highest-rated series for Brian Williams and Tim Russert. With 24 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday, the networks - bolstered by rising interest in the primaries - have suddenly become super-serious about covering presidential politics.
FEATURES
By Joan Scobey and Joan Scobey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2001
NEW YORK -- Shortly after the World Trade Center disaster Sept. 11, chefs from New York City's top restaurants instinctively started doing what they do best: feed people. Some came from restaurants in lower Manhattan that were temporarily forced to close. Others, further uptown, mourned World Trade Center victims who were among their friends and customers, and jumped into action. Now, as New Yorkers again try to go about their normal lives, visitors and residents can eat some of the best food in town while showing their gratitude to these restaurateurs whose stars shine brighter today than any that Michelin could bestow.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 5, 1999
Out with the new, and in with the old.That's the plan, as of yesterday anyway, at ABC News for reviving its troubled "Good Morning America" show.In a major overhaul, two anchors and an executive producer were dumped yesterday to be replaced on an interim basis starting Jan. 18 by former "GMA" host Charles Gibson and Diane Sawyer, of the "20/20" newsmagazine. Sawyer's return to mornings, where she worked as co-host of "CBS This Morning" from 1981 to 1984, is one of the more surprising turns taken of late by the revolving chairs at the morning show.
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