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Diane Lane

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | May 12, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- It was one of those humbling moments at which a veteran actress might take offense. But not Diane Lane. Recalls Lane, who stars in the erotic thriller Unfaithful, which opened "Some lady came up to me in yoga class the other day and said, 'I loved you in A Little Romance and I'm glad you're back.' "Where was I? Out working. My checks clear." Lane laughs a throaty laugh. Lane has flirted with fame since her precocious turn as a 13-year-old with Laurence Olivier in A Little Romance (1979)
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
The only reason to see Nights in Rodanthe is to check in with Diane Lane. Rarely have movie fans had a chance to grow up with a star the way they have with Lane, from her youthful heartbreaker days in films like Streets of Fire (1984) to her mature vibrancy in Unfaithful (2002). If you've followed her career, you bring an affectionate familiarity to her movies that make them watchable even when they stink. Neither a femme fatale nor a girl next door, Lane has always had an intense prettiness and the confidence to let her passions crack it open.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
The only reason to see Nights in Rodanthe is to check in with Diane Lane. Rarely have movie fans had a chance to grow up with a star the way they have with Lane, from her youthful heartbreaker days in films like Streets of Fire (1984) to her mature vibrancy in Unfaithful (2002). If you've followed her career, you bring an affectionate familiarity to her movies that make them watchable even when they stink. Neither a femme fatale nor a girl next door, Lane has always had an intense prettiness and the confidence to let her passions crack it open.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 8, 2006
The producers of Hollywoodland reportedly couldn't get permission to use their original title, which was Truth, Justice and the American Way. That's a shame, because not only would Superman's motto have better reflected what the movie is about -- the suspicious 1959 shooting death of actor George Reeves, TV's original Superman -- it would have given the film sorely needed focus. Hollywoodland (Focus Features) Starring Adrien Brody, Diane Lane, Ben Affleck. Directed by Allen Coulter. Rated R. Time 126 minutes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE *** (three stars) American movies are generally so skittish about sexuality that Adrian Lyne's appetite - and aptitude - for exploring it in Unfaithful is a relief. In this variation on Claude Chabrol's ambiguously ironic La Femme Infidele, Lyne does the opposite of Chabrol: Lyne sensualizes everything, including an All-American family, so that watching this movie, at least for its first half, is like stretching out in a sauna set for different times at different temperatures: warm for the domestic scenes, hot-hot-hot for the illicit lovemaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bruce Newman and Bruce Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - When Audrey Wells set out to adapt the best-selling memoir Under the Tuscan Sun for the screen, she knew she would have one small obstacle to overcome. "There is no way to make a movie out of that book," says Wells, who was in San Francisco recently to discuss the film that she went ahead and wrote and directed anyway. It opens tomorrow. Despite the enormous popularity of Frances Mayes' book - her account of the restoration of an Italian villa spent 126 weeks on the New York Times best seller list - it lacked even a wisp of a plot.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 8, 2006
The producers of Hollywoodland reportedly couldn't get permission to use their original title, which was Truth, Justice and the American Way. That's a shame, because not only would Superman's motto have better reflected what the movie is about -- the suspicious 1959 shooting death of actor George Reeves, TV's original Superman -- it would have given the film sorely needed focus. Hollywoodland (Focus Features) Starring Adrien Brody, Diane Lane, Ben Affleck. Directed by Allen Coulter. Rated R. Time 126 minutes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1996
Put "Jack" back in the box.Robin Williams, the ultimate clown, is unfunny and overbearing in this irritating fable about a boy who ages four times faster than his peers and thus looks like a 40-year-old when he's just 10.Director Francis Ford Coppola has undisputed classics to his credit, among them "The Godfather" and "Apocalypse Now." Rack "Jack" up with that dreadful short film about a little girl that Coppola plopped in the middle of "New York Stories.""Jack" begins with promise, when Jack's mom (Diane Lane)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 9, 1999
Is any actress mellowing in a more interesting way than Diane Lane?She started out as another pretty face in movies like "Rumble Fish" and "The Outsiders," and she went on to appear in marginal films, her sultry beauty always a pleasant surprise. But in "A Walk on the Moon," Lane takes full hold of the screen, her weary, still-gorgeous face and smoky voice galvanizing everything around her.Seeing Lane in this wonderfully realized role is reason enough to see "A Walk on the Moon," but, gratefully, it isn't the only one. This intimate movie makes an unexpected impact, in part because of Lane and her fellow actors but also because Tony Goldwyn makes his directorial debut with uncommon assurance and restraint.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 23, 1993
"Knight Moves" does for chess what "Wind" did for sailing: nothing.A hysterically overwrought sex-crime thriller set at a chess tournament, it's so busy reminding people it's an actual movie that it all but forgets to tell its story. In fact, it's so hyperactive I suspect that the director, Carl Schenkel, about whom I know nothing, went to film school twice.It begins in a black and white past, where a child prodigy is whacking the bejabbers out of a regular child over a chess game. Except the regular child isn't so regular; when he loses in seven moves, he jumps across the board and begins to stab the chess boy in the throat with a fountain pen. When he goes home, the "regular" boy finds his dad has left and that his mom is lying in a blood-soaked bed, having slashed her wrists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bruce Newman and Bruce Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - When Audrey Wells set out to adapt the best-selling memoir Under the Tuscan Sun for the screen, she knew she would have one small obstacle to overcome. "There is no way to make a movie out of that book," says Wells, who was in San Francisco recently to discuss the film that she went ahead and wrote and directed anyway. It opens tomorrow. Despite the enormous popularity of Frances Mayes' book - her account of the restoration of an Italian villa spent 126 weeks on the New York Times best seller list - it lacked even a wisp of a plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
* BEST PICTURE Academy Pick: Chicago, because it thrillingly revitalizes the movie musical, and because Los Angeles knows, even better than Chicago does, how to turn notoriety into show-biz clout. Sragow Pick: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (above), for preserving the life of larger-than-life spectacles while conjuring awe-inspiring images -- and putting them at the service of an epic story that sees the good and evil within us all. * BEST DIRECTOR Academy Pick: Rob Marshall, because in Chicago he brings contemporary cutting and pizazz to singing, dancing and banter while showcasing his rich human material, the tip-top performers, instead of reducing them to hideous puppets a la last year's Moulin Rouge.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2003
The musical Chicago, the epic Gangs of New York and art-house hit The Hours sprinted out of the gate as Oscar's front-runners when the nominations for the 75th annual Academy Awards were announced yesterday. Julianne Moore received two nominations, for best actress in Far From Heaven and best supporting actress in The Hours. "In such a year of such wonderful performances, I am incredibly honored to be among these nominees," Moore said. "Never in my career have I ever imagined I would have two nominations!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | May 12, 2002
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- It was one of those humbling moments at which a veteran actress might take offense. But not Diane Lane. Recalls Lane, who stars in the erotic thriller Unfaithful, which opened "Some lady came up to me in yoga class the other day and said, 'I loved you in A Little Romance and I'm glad you're back.' "Where was I? Out working. My checks clear." Lane laughs a throaty laugh. Lane has flirted with fame since her precocious turn as a 13-year-old with Laurence Olivier in A Little Romance (1979)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 10, 2002
SUN SCORE *** (three stars) American movies are generally so skittish about sexuality that Adrian Lyne's appetite - and aptitude - for exploring it in Unfaithful is a relief. In this variation on Claude Chabrol's ambiguously ironic La Femme Infidele, Lyne does the opposite of Chabrol: Lyne sensualizes everything, including an All-American family, so that watching this movie, at least for its first half, is like stretching out in a sauna set for different times at different temperatures: warm for the domestic scenes, hot-hot-hot for the illicit lovemaking.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 9, 1999
Is any actress mellowing in a more interesting way than Diane Lane?She started out as another pretty face in movies like "Rumble Fish" and "The Outsiders," and she went on to appear in marginal films, her sultry beauty always a pleasant surprise. But in "A Walk on the Moon," Lane takes full hold of the screen, her weary, still-gorgeous face and smoky voice galvanizing everything around her.Seeing Lane in this wonderfully realized role is reason enough to see "A Walk on the Moon," but, gratefully, it isn't the only one. This intimate movie makes an unexpected impact, in part because of Lane and her fellow actors but also because Tony Goldwyn makes his directorial debut with uncommon assurance and restraint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
* BEST PICTURE Academy Pick: Chicago, because it thrillingly revitalizes the movie musical, and because Los Angeles knows, even better than Chicago does, how to turn notoriety into show-biz clout. Sragow Pick: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (above), for preserving the life of larger-than-life spectacles while conjuring awe-inspiring images -- and putting them at the service of an epic story that sees the good and evil within us all. * BEST DIRECTOR Academy Pick: Rob Marshall, because in Chicago he brings contemporary cutting and pizazz to singing, dancing and banter while showcasing his rich human material, the tip-top performers, instead of reducing them to hideous puppets a la last year's Moulin Rouge.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | November 24, 1990
There's no denying that George C. Scott is one of America's most watchable actors. When he's on screen he fascinates -- a presence who seems to swell and overwhelm anybody else. Yet Scott has fared better than he does in "Descending Angel," a new film premiering on cable tomorrow night (at 9 on the HBO premium service).This is one of those movies that seems to just miss working at every turn, at least in part because last year's theatrical film "The Music Box," with Jessica Lange, dealt more persuasively with similar material.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 18, 1997
How far we've come from the days when the president appeared in movies as the great white father, usually a presence so powerful and religious in meaning that, like Christ's, not even his face could be shown. In "Yankee Doodle Dandy," James Cagney's George M. Cohan stood as at Lourdes before the unseen radiance of FDR.Thus, while "Murder at 1600" is a little bit this side of OK as a movie, it is completely fascinating as a cultural artifact. That benevolent, theocratic force known as the commander-in-chief has been deconstructed by our impolite age to a whining, pitiful loser, frozen in the headlight-glare of onrushing catastrophe, indecisive, fretting and sniffling.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1996
Put "Jack" back in the box.Robin Williams, the ultimate clown, is unfunny and overbearing in this irritating fable about a boy who ages four times faster than his peers and thus looks like a 40-year-old when he's just 10.Director Francis Ford Coppola has undisputed classics to his credit, among them "The Godfather" and "Apocalypse Now." Rack "Jack" up with that dreadful short film about a little girl that Coppola plopped in the middle of "New York Stories.""Jack" begins with promise, when Jack's mom (Diane Lane)
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