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Diane Keaton

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By Chicago Tribune | December 3, 1991
What kind of director is actress Diane Keaton?Very good, to judge by her directorial film debut in a grim but ultimately uplifting movie called "Wildflower," premiering on the Lifetime cable network at 9 tonight.Having previously directed a CBS afternoon special, a couple of TV series episodes and a documentary titled "Heaven," Ms. Keaton is a little arty behind the ears, indulging in such showboating as slow motion and weird camera angles. But she displays an obviously effective way with actors, especially the young ones upon whose shoulders the film rests.
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By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
When Renee Fleming appears Sept. 15 with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for the BSO's Gala Celebration, the appeal will be both sound and sight. The world-renowned soprano is famous not just for her voice, but for her gowns, designed for her by the likes of Gianfranco Ferre, John Galliano for Dior, Karl Lagerfeld, Christian Lacroix, Oscar de la Renta, Douglas Hannant and Angel Sanchez. We chatted with her about some of her favorites. Is it fun to play dress-up in a way most of us just dream about?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | February 2, 2007
If grating is what you are looking for, then by all means, don't miss Because I Said So. Watching this movie, with Diane Keaton cast as the ne plus ultra of irritating, overbearing mothers, is roughly the equivalent of listening to fingernails on a chalkboard for nearly two hours. With her skittishness and her near-constant state of fluster, Keaton as a comic actress can be wonderfully endearing, the sort of lovable ditz you can laugh with and desperately want to protect. But here, as a mother who can't bear the thought of her lovelorn daughter (Mandy Moore)
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By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | February 6, 2007
The best that Hollywood could do for women who don't care about football or hot wings is, apparently, Because I Said So, a movie for mothers who want to show their daughters how much worse things could be. I went to this movie so I could feel better about myself, and it worked. I am not only a better mother than Diane Keaton - not nearly so over-involved and controlling despite the protestations of my children to the contrary. I am also a better actress. In this movie, Keaton reprises the character she played in Something's Gotta Give and amps her up until you can no longer bear to watch.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 12, 2003
Sun Score 3-stars Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton are so good in Something's Gotta Give, it's a shame writer-director Nancy Meyers couldn't rein herself in a little more. At 90 minutes, this would have been a top-of-the-line romantic comedy, cleverly written, wonderfully acted and marvelously paced. At two hours, it's still wonderfully acted - Keaton hasn't been this appealing since Annie Hall - but displays a dangerous tendency to drag. Had Meyers done away with some of the twists and turns crammed into the last half-hour, as well as an ending that strains both credulity and patience, she would have had a classic.
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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 24, 1995
The man with the most memorable on-camera entrances in show business lives up to his billing in the film "Unstrung Heroes," a touching drama directed by Diane Keaton.Michael Richards, who has turned the offbeat Kramer on TV's "Seinfeld" into a national cult figure, makes his grand entrance in the film through a window. It is one of many hysterical moments in a film that is not what one would consider a comedy.Being light among the dark was of serious concern to Mr. Richards, who says he turned down considerably more lucrative offers to do film comedies so that he could appear in this relatively low-budget drama.
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By Jay Carr and Jay Carr,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1996
Just when we were getting used to the idea of Diane Keaton as a director, here she comes roaring back as an actress. Before the year ends, she'll be seen opposite Meryl Streep, Hume Cronyn and Robert De Niro in "Marvin's Room." But first, she gets mad -- then gets even -- as one of three discarded wives in "The First Wives Club," opposite Goldie Hawn and Bette Midler. The movie opened Friday.Well, maybe roaring back is putting it a little strongly. The word from the "First Wives Club" set was that if all three were served a bad meal, Hawn and Midler would send it back -- while Keaton would smile, eat it and get sick.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
A lot of folks have never met a clown they liked. At the circus, they suffered the clowns until the tigers and acrobats showed up. They were polite to clowns at birthday parties, assuming -- falsely --that children might like Bozo better than they did. Ronald McDonald did not make meals any happier. What could dampen their good spirits quicker than a clown? Perhaps a painting of a clown ... or a whole book of them. "How much do I have to pay to not have one of these paintings hanging in my house?"
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November 23, 2005
Watch for the holiday movie preview - filled with stories, listings and an interview with Diane Keaton (below, who stars in The Family Stone) as well as regular weekly features -in The Sun's Movies Today section.
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September 12, 1990
Kathryn Grody, who stars with Diane Keaton and Carol Kane in ''The Lemon Sisters,'' currently showing at local theaters, will do a one-woman show called ''A Mom's Life,'' Sunday, Sept. 23, at 3 p.m. at Westminster Hall (515 West Fayette St.). All tickets are $10.Grody is married to actor-singer Mandy Patinkin (''Dick Tracy''). Her show is ''about the joys and frustrations of being a mother.''Grody is a two-time winner of the off-Broadway Obie Award. Her presentation is part of the Command Performance program sponsored by the University of Maryland at Baltimore.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | February 2, 2007
If grating is what you are looking for, then by all means, don't miss Because I Said So. Watching this movie, with Diane Keaton cast as the ne plus ultra of irritating, overbearing mothers, is roughly the equivalent of listening to fingernails on a chalkboard for nearly two hours. With her skittishness and her near-constant state of fluster, Keaton as a comic actress can be wonderfully endearing, the sort of lovable ditz you can laugh with and desperately want to protect. But here, as a mother who can't bear the thought of her lovelorn daughter (Mandy Moore)
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November 23, 2005
Watch for the holiday movie preview - filled with stories, listings and an interview with Diane Keaton (below, who stars in The Family Stone) as well as regular weekly features -in The Sun's Movies Today section.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
Naomi Watts sparkled in a gorgeous Versace gown. Nicole Kidman wore Chanel couture and her hair in a cascade of curls. Liv Tyler's Givenchy gown was a fabulous study in black. This year's Academy Awards show was a high-glam, leap day's journey into night. Fashion faux pas were few as actresses - draped in chiffon, tulle and silk - chose to emulate bygone eras of elegance. Hair was softly curled, shoulders were bare, and cleavage ruled the night. The Oscars ritual returned to its showy self after two years of relative solemnity imposed by the Sept.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 28, 2004
A13-year-old New Zealand girl. An actor channeling a member of the Rolling Stones. A violent, gritty Brazilian film cast with amateur actors. An ostensible sure thing whose reception instead proved nearly as cold as its name. It's nice to see the Oscars haven't lost their ability to surprise. The 2003 Academy Award nominations, announced at a pre-dawn ceremony yesterday in Beverly Hills, proved a delightfully adroit mix of the expected and unexpected. Yes, the early favorites dominated - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King led all films with 11 nominations, including a Best Picture nod. But movies that lie off most people's radar screens also were recognized.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 26, 2004
Loosey goosey speeches - Mary Louise Parker thanking her newborn son for making her low-cut dress work - overdressed stars, prizes for The Lord of the Rings, Mystic River, Lost in Translation and Fox TV's 24 and HBO's Angels in America, for which Parker won her trophy. And a lot of plugs for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Welcome to the 2004 Golden Globes, the New Hampshire Primary of the movie awards season. Like New Hampshire, the Globes, awarded last night in Beverly Hills, Calif.
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By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 2003
Forget Paris Hilton. The most interesting naked people on-screen these days are savvier and more talented than Hilton. Wrinklier, too. Think of them as the naked and the two-thirds dead -- actors over 50 who are baring all. It's the biggest trend in the movies, with five of them this month alone. The trend didn't come out of nowhere. Sir John Gielgud was revealing his titled, nonagenarian privates as far back as 1991 in Prospero's Books. But Kathy Bates' gutsy hot-tub scene in last year's About Schmidt seems to have kick-started a real trend, to the extent that five former Oscar nominees (Diane Keaton, Jack Nicholson, William H. Macy, Danny DeVito and Helen Mirren)
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By Lou Cedrone | December 23, 1991
Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor did a much better ''Father of the Bride'' in 1950, but the new version, starring Steve Martin, Diane Keaton and Martin Short, has its laughs.The film's basic flaw is that it mixes high comedy with low comedy, and the melange doesn't quite work.Martin, doing the role originated by Tracy, plays the father of a 22-year-old girl who arrives home to announce that she is planning to marry a young man she has met in Rome.Dad is nonplused. This is his little girl.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
An ABC special pays tribute to television's funniest women over the years, but other funny females can be found in the lineup tonight.* "50 Years of Funny Females" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) nTC -- So what's John Ritter doing in this show? Evidently something to do with his work on "Three's Company." At least everybody else listed by the network in the special fits the gender, including Annie Potts, Paula Poundstone, Pam Stone and Debbie Allen as presenters of memorable clips featuring Lucille Ball, Vivian Vance, Mary Tyler Moore, Valerie Harper, Gilda Radner, Diane Keaton, Roseanne, Brett Butler and Ellen DeGeneres.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 12, 2003
Sun Score 3-stars Jack Nicholson and Diane Keaton are so good in Something's Gotta Give, it's a shame writer-director Nancy Meyers couldn't rein herself in a little more. At 90 minutes, this would have been a top-of-the-line romantic comedy, cleverly written, wonderfully acted and marvelously paced. At two hours, it's still wonderfully acted - Keaton hasn't been this appealing since Annie Hall - but displays a dangerous tendency to drag. Had Meyers done away with some of the twists and turns crammed into the last half-hour, as well as an ending that strains both credulity and patience, she would have had a classic.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
A lot of folks have never met a clown they liked. At the circus, they suffered the clowns until the tigers and acrobats showed up. They were polite to clowns at birthday parties, assuming -- falsely --that children might like Bozo better than they did. Ronald McDonald did not make meals any happier. What could dampen their good spirits quicker than a clown? Perhaps a painting of a clown ... or a whole book of them. "How much do I have to pay to not have one of these paintings hanging in my house?"
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