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Diana Vreeland

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By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
Her personality was flamboyant, her looks were striking and her taste was impeccable. Now Diana Vreeland has been immortalized in a new biography, Diana Vreeland, by Eleanor Dwight (William Morrow, 320 pages, $50). Vreeland, long-time editor at Harper's Bazaar and editor-in-chief of Vogue, is famous for helping first lady Jackie Kennedy create her often copied "Jackie look." She transformed Vogue from a prim, conventional magazine into a daring one by doing such innovative things as sending models all over the world to be photographed on the edges of cliffs and in dazzling locales.
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NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
Her personality was flamboyant, her looks were striking and her taste was impeccable. Now Diana Vreeland has been immortalized in a new biography, Diana Vreeland, by Eleanor Dwight (William Morrow, 320 pages, $50). Vreeland, long-time editor at Harper's Bazaar and editor-in-chief of Vogue, is famous for helping first lady Jackie Kennedy create her often copied "Jackie look." She transformed Vogue from a prim, conventional magazine into a daring one by doing such innovative things as sending models all over the world to be photographed on the edges of cliffs and in dazzling locales.
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NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,Special to The Sun | September 10, 1995
"In and Out of Vogue: A Memoir," by Grace Mirabella with Judith Warner. New York: Doubleday. 257 pages. $25As I read "In and Out of Vogue," the autobiography of editor Grace Mirabella, I was reminded, forcibly, of a soldier of fashion. Ms. Mirabella had the courage and, perhaps, the lack of imagination of an enlistee.Born in Newark, N. J., of a middle-class, Italian-American, "Depression" parentage, Ms. Mirabella was self-made. While many other women of her generation hoped for the support of a husband, Ms. Mirabella relied on herself.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 4, 1996
Call it paint-chip paranoia. You have been burnt before; your confidence has been shaken.How many times have you taken these tiny samples home and tried to match them to fabric or a color in a painting? Even when you take a fabric or picture into the store for computer matching, the color rarely turns out the way you envisioned.The paint looks too dark or too light. The terra cotta that appeared sensational in a small chip looks disgusting on a big wall.So how can those chic decorating magazines and designer show houses use unusual colors that work perfectly?
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | August 4, 1996
Call it paint-chip paranoia. You have been burnt before; your confidence has been shaken.How many times have you taken these tiny samples home and tried to match them to fabric or a color in a painting? Even when you take a fabric or picture into the store for computer matching, the color rarely turns out the way you envisioned.The paint looks too dark or too light. The terra cotta that appeared sensational in a small chip looks disgusting on a big wall.So how can those chic decorating magazines and designer show houses use unusual colors that work perfectly?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 15, 2000
Towson University's Maryland Arts Festival kicks off tonight with a production of "Full Gallop," Mark Hampton's one-woman show about fashion legend Diana Vreeland, the late editor of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Maravene Loeschke, Towson's dean of fine arts and communication, stars under the direction of her husband, C. Richard Gillespie, founder of the theater program. Three other stage shows will be presented during this summer's festival: "Noises Off" (June 24-July 15), on the mainstage of the Center for the Arts; "The World Goes 'Round" (July 7-29)
NEWS
February 27, 1996
Anna Larina, 82, the widow of Nikolai I. Bukharin, a father of the Bolshevik Revolution who was executed under Stalin, and herself a survivor of a Soviet gulag, died Saturday in Moscow of lung cancer, said her daughter, Nadezhda Fadeyeva.Dorothy Maynor, 85, a highly regarded soprano recitalist who founded the Harlem School of the Arts in New York, died Feb. 19 in West Chester, Pa.Miss Maynor, whose career helped open the way for black artists such as Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price, possessed a voice that the New Grove Dictionary of American Music describes as "a soaring, bell-like soprano capable of exquisite musical effects, supported by a sincere and ardent temperament."
NEWS
By Joyce Saenz Harris and Joyce Saenz Harris,Dallas Morning News | February 27, 2000
Karen Graham believed that her days as the "Estee Lauder girl" were long behind her. After all, she was retired from modeling and had spent most of the past decade at her country home in upstate New York, teaching the sport she loves: fly-fishing. Then, "out of the blue" in the summer of 1998, Lauder senior vice president Robert Luzzi called her up. "Would you be interested in doing another ad campaign for us?" he asked. Graham was surprised, pleased and excited. Then she had "this moment of terror," as she puts it. "Do you know how old I am?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith James | December 18, 2003
Federal-era Riversdale House Museum opens its festively decorated doors Sunday for its Holiday Open House. Costumed interpreters will greet guests as they enter the mansion, which offers a punch bowl, open-hearth cooking, refreshments and activities for children. Visitors can tour the mansion, a National Historic Landmark, which will be decked out in 19th-century finery. The museum shop, featuring books, toys and other gifts, will also be open. Riversdale is at 4811 Riverdale Road, Riverdale Park, near the intersection of Kenilworth Avenue and East West Highway in Prince George's County.
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service | December 9, 1993
She has become part of the mythology of fashion, dominating the middle decades of this century.So it was altogether fitting and proper that the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York chose Diana Vreeland as the subject of its new exhibition.The exhibition captures some of the enthusiasms and style of the woman with craggy features and blue-black hair who served as an impresario of fashion from the mid-1930s until her death, in 1989, at age 86.She mesmerized designers as diverse as Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Issey Miyake, Valentino, Gianni Versace and Arnold Scaasi.
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,Special to The Sun | September 10, 1995
"In and Out of Vogue: A Memoir," by Grace Mirabella with Judith Warner. New York: Doubleday. 257 pages. $25As I read "In and Out of Vogue," the autobiography of editor Grace Mirabella, I was reminded, forcibly, of a soldier of fashion. Ms. Mirabella had the courage and, perhaps, the lack of imagination of an enlistee.Born in Newark, N. J., of a middle-class, Italian-American, "Depression" parentage, Ms. Mirabella was self-made. While many other women of her generation hoped for the support of a husband, Ms. Mirabella relied on herself.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
Billy Baldwin, the noted Baltimore-born interior designer whose clients included Cole Porter, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Mike Nichols, Harvey Ladew, William S. Paley and Diana Vreeland, among many others of the jeweled glitterati, is reported to have once said that "good taste is the dullest thing in the world." "Modernism at Evergreen: Baltimore's Billy Baldwin," a recently opened exhibition at the Evergreen Museum & Library, recalls the career of the man that The New York Times described on his death in 1983 as the "dean of American interior decorators, whose taste and sense of elegance enabled him to become the greatest influence on a generation of post-World War II designers."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | December 15, 1994
One of the lavish new fashion books out this holiday season might be just the gift for the impossibly stylish ones on your list. Fashion brings an intimacy to the coffee table in a way that garden-variety gift books cannot. Ramblings through stately homes and formal gardens only serve to reinforce the distance between there and here. Few of us inhabit palaces, but at one time or another all of us have attempted to disguise or enhance what nature dealt us.That's what makes closer looks at the vagaries of the fashionable world so fascinating.
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