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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 12, 1994
Diana Ross is about to turn 50 and to make yet another comeback.This time, it's as an actress.It's been 16 years since Ross' last film, "The Wiz."Sunday night, she returns to the screen in her first made-for-TV movie, ABC's "Out of Darkness."Ross met with TV critics yesterday to promote the film and talked about the ups and downs of one of the most spectacular show business careers in our lifetime."Since my last film, which I won't tell you how many years it'sbeen, I have been reading scripts, and I've been with a few different agents," Ross said.
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By EILEEN AMBROSE | July 12, 2009
Despite the high drama over Michael Jackson's estate, the late pop singer did many things right when it came to end-of-life planning. The big thing is that the 50-year-old had a will - critical to anyone with young children. Jackson's will named business associates as executors to carry out his wishes and designated guardians for his three young children. He also set up a family trust that can keep the division of his estate out of the public eye. More people could learn from him. Too often people don't get around to making a will.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | December 21, 2006
Is Deena Jones Diana Ross? Are the Dreamettes really the Supremes? Dreamgirls, the much-buzzed-about movie version of the 1981 hit Broadway musical, doesn't say so flat out. But the costumes in the film (in theaters nationally Christmas Day) -- from the many extravagant gowns to those used for the transformation of the once-meek lead character into a fabulous, fashionable diva -- say it all too well. "This is pure, unadulterated glamour," says Jacqui Stafford, executive style director for Shape magazine, about the outfits worn in the film by Deena Jones (Beyonce Knowles)
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | July 11, 2007
Diana Ross gave it her fabled all last week at Manhattan's Jazz at Lincoln Center in a one-woman concert sponsored by Qatar Airlines, celebrating their inaugural flights to New York City. Colin Cowie covered the room in burgundy flowers, which matched Diana's gown. A glam coincidence? Perhaps. Ross changed midset into a lime-green number with more sequins and chiffon. She was in fine voice, earthy and electric with the joy of performing. The best sight? An audience of sophisticated New Yorkers throwing the aforementioned blooms at Ross' feet as she took her final bows.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 16, 2000
Who would have thought that Diana Ross and the Supremes would have made their comeback as an opening act? But that's pretty much what happened Wednesday night, when Ross and the Supremes kicked off their "Return to Love" tour at the First Union Spectrum in Philadelphia. The show opened with an hour-long set in which the reconstituted trio ran through its greatest hits, everything from "Where Did Our Love Go" to "The Happening." Then, after a brief intermission, the crowd was treated to a set by the show's headliner: Miss Diana Ross.
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 15, 2007
NOW HERE'S a little flash! Bill and Hillary Clinton have their eyes on the ball when it comes to 2008, but in the meantime, has anyone noted that they bought a piece of beach property in the Dominican Republic right next to the beautiful domain of designer Oscar de la Renta and his wife, Annette? Struggles pay off The Supremes -- Mary Wilson, Flo Ballard and Diana Ross -- used to sing "Nothing but heartaches ... nothing but heartaches," way back when. Heartaches by the number actually then came to all three women.
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 23, 1991
Washington--Another unauthorized biography. Another no-holds-barred, warts-and-all portrait of a glitzy, high-profile, enigmatic figure. Another hefty tome of sex, lies and, in this case, videotapings. More luscious scandal. More good dirt.But Michael Jackson biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli, a white kid from Philly who used to dream of being one of the Temptations, wants to make one thing clear:He's no Kitty Kelley.On a tour to promote "Michael Jackson, The Magic and the Madness," Mr. Taraborrelli has heard it over and over again: "People like you and Kitty Kelley . . ."
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | July 23, 1991
WATCH OUT, Madonna.J. Randy Taraborrelli's coming.If Taraborrelli's planned and certainly "unauthorized" biography of the Material Girl uncovers as much dirt as his best-selling tomes on Diana Ross and Michael Jackson, then mud will certainly be flung."
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 20, 2007
Poised and elegant in a satiny, pearl-colored gown, it looked as though Lakisha Jones was ready to receive her diva crown. And on last week's American Idol -- whose special guest was pop's ultimate diva, Diana Ross -- the Fort Meade resident's performance matched her regal presence. Jones turned out a soulful rendition of "God Bless the Child," the Billie Holiday classic that Ross crooned in the 1972 film Lady Sings the Blues. So far, Jones, 27, has nailed every Idol performance, imposing her gospel-seared style onto sweeping ballads made popular by Whitney Houston (1992's "I Have Nothing")
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By GREGORY N. KROLCZYK and GREGORY N. KROLCZYK,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1993
It's a shame that Diana Ross' memoirs, "Secrets of a Sparrow," aren't available on CD. If it were, you could fast-forward, getting 30- or 40-second snippets from each chapter and be done with it -- rather than wading through all 280 pages.Which is not to say this is a bad book -- you just have to looooooove Diana Ross in order to finish it without a couple of tablets of No-Doz and a high tolerance for overwriting.Despite the title, there are no secrets here. Ms. Ross has not revealed anything we didn't already know -- or suspect.
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By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 15, 2007
NOW HERE'S a little flash! Bill and Hillary Clinton have their eyes on the ball when it comes to 2008, but in the meantime, has anyone noted that they bought a piece of beach property in the Dominican Republic right next to the beautiful domain of designer Oscar de la Renta and his wife, Annette? Struggles pay off The Supremes -- Mary Wilson, Flo Ballard and Diana Ross -- used to sing "Nothing but heartaches ... nothing but heartaches," way back when. Heartaches by the number actually then came to all three women.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 20, 2007
Poised and elegant in a satiny, pearl-colored gown, it looked as though Lakisha Jones was ready to receive her diva crown. And on last week's American Idol -- whose special guest was pop's ultimate diva, Diana Ross -- the Fort Meade resident's performance matched her regal presence. Jones turned out a soulful rendition of "God Bless the Child," the Billie Holiday classic that Ross crooned in the 1972 film Lady Sings the Blues. So far, Jones, 27, has nailed every Idol performance, imposing her gospel-seared style onto sweeping ballads made popular by Whitney Houston (1992's "I Have Nothing")
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | December 21, 2006
Is Deena Jones Diana Ross? Are the Dreamettes really the Supremes? Dreamgirls, the much-buzzed-about movie version of the 1981 hit Broadway musical, doesn't say so flat out. But the costumes in the film (in theaters nationally Christmas Day) -- from the many extravagant gowns to those used for the transformation of the once-meek lead character into a fabulous, fashionable diva -- say it all too well. "This is pure, unadulterated glamour," says Jacqui Stafford, executive style director for Shape magazine, about the outfits worn in the film by Deena Jones (Beyonce Knowles)
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By DAN RODRICKS | September 13, 2000
FRANK LIDINSKY, who collects records, is himself something of a broken one, but I kind of like him that way. Almost every year at this time, he slips me a little reminder of what happened on this date in Baltimore history: The Beatles came to town. The Beatles. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Paul McCartney's band before Wings. John, Paul, George and the luckiest drummer boy who ever lived. They appeared at the then-new Arena (nee Civic Center) for two shows on Sept. 13, 1964. It was the biggest thing to happen to downtown Baltimore since the Great Fire of '04. It was certainly the biggest thing that ever happened to Frank Lidinsky, who was there.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 16, 2000
Who would have thought that Diana Ross and the Supremes would have made their comeback as an opening act? But that's pretty much what happened Wednesday night, when Ross and the Supremes kicked off their "Return to Love" tour at the First Union Spectrum in Philadelphia. The show opened with an hour-long set in which the reconstituted trio ran through its greatest hits, everything from "Where Did Our Love Go" to "The Happening." Then, after a brief intermission, the crowd was treated to a set by the show's headliner: Miss Diana Ross.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 15, 1999
"Double Platinum" is an urban fairy tale.Once upon a time in a poor part of an old city in the South, a young singer (Diana Ross) abandoned her husband and baby. This was hard, but the singer had to "follow her dream."She went to the big, magical city of New York and, sure enough, she became a star. In fact, she's now the queen of all divas, bigger even than Whitney Houston.But she also found it "lonely at the top" and now, 18 years later, returns to find the daughter she left behind (Brandy)
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By KEVIN COWHERD | January 25, 1996
ONCE AGAIN this Sunday, millions of us will gather in front of the TV to watch a dull, one-sided football game, high-five each other listlessly with our orange, Chee-tos-stained fingers and pretend we're having fun.This is the rich legacy of the Super Bowl, America's premier sporting event, which combines the best features of modern society: sedentary behavior and the ingestion of fatty, artery-clogging foods and alcohol.It's a wonder the day doesn't dissolve into a wail of ambulance sirens, as anxious paramedics burst into countless living rooms, slap jellied defibrillator pads to the chests of unconscious patients and scream "Clear!"
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By Kevin Cowherd | February 4, 1999
IT WAS SURE NICE of Cher to get all dressed up to sing the National Anthem at the Super Bowl.Let's see if we can follow her thinking as she peeked into her closet before the big game for something to wear:It's the most celebrated sporting event of the year.A national TV audience of 127 million is tuning in.She's singing "The Star Spangled Banner," this country's most revered song.So what does she do?She shows up looking like it's fifth-period algebra.She takes the microphone at Pro Player Stadium wearing blue denim boots, faded jeans and a pink mesh top that looked like something from the Gap.Oh, that was a nice touch.
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By Kevin Cowherd | February 4, 1999
IT WAS SURE NICE of Cher to get all dressed up to sing the National Anthem at the Super Bowl.Let's see if we can follow her thinking as she peeked into her closet before the big game for something to wear:It's the most celebrated sporting event of the year.A national TV audience of 127 million is tuning in.She's singing "The Star Spangled Banner," this country's most revered song.So what does she do?She shows up looking like it's fifth-period algebra.She takes the microphone at Pro Player Stadium wearing blue denim boots, faded jeans and a pink mesh top that looked like something from the Gap.Oh, that was a nice touch.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 1998
Aretha Franklin, looking every inch the Queen of Soul in a doozy of a black felt hat bedecked with silver studs, is sitting at the piano. She's talking about Smokey Robinson -- singer, songwriter and genius.Franklin stops talking in mid-sentence, and her fingers take to the keyboard. She lays down a soft blanket of gospel chords -- slow, deliberate, seductive. It's the opening of "Tracks of My Tears," only it's done at a tempo less than half that of the Robinson classic, and it's juiced in the blues.
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