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By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Under a banner celebrating the 25th anniversary of Diamond Ridge Golf Course, Baltimore County officials yesterday ushered in a new era for golf in the county.In a ceremony billed as "Golf Day in Baltimore County," the government officials announced plans for a new public course, recognized the head professionals of the three county courses and discussed national awards for two of the county's courses.Although there has been talk of another public facility for several years, Wayne Harman, director of recreation and parks, made Diamond Ridge II official, announcing that Lindsay Ervin of Crofton will be the architect for the 18-hole layout on county-owned land next to the current Woodlawn course.
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By Stefen Lovelace and Katherine Dunn and Stefen Lovelace and Katherine Dunn,Sun Reporters | October 3, 2007
Notebook The Patterson boys soccer team had won 16 straight Baltimore City league games, but City was not intimidated when it faced the Clippers last Wednesday. The Knights ended the Clippers' streak with a 2-1 win at Patterson. Nathal Ahmad and Dan Meade scored in the first half for the Knights. It was a big win for City and first-year coach George Sfikas. "I told them I was proud of them," Sfikas said after the win. "I told them as long as we get better every game, if you buy into what I tell you, things are going to get better."
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NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Golfers at The Woodlands/Diamond Ridge courses in Woodlawn are enjoying the new clubhouse, a $1.8 million project that opened in October after nearly 1 1/2 years in planning and construction. Almost all Woodlands/Diamond Ridge regulars had long tired of the small structure that had been the makeshift clubhouse since the birth of Diamond Ridge in the late 1960s. With the inception of The Woodlands, in its seventh season, came added expectation. It was only a matter of time and money, said Tim Butler, assistant general manager for the Diamond Ridge and the Woodlands courses, who described the former clubhouse as small but functional for one course.
NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2004
Golfers at The Woodlands/Diamond Ridge courses in Woodlawn are enjoying the new clubhouse, a $1.8 million project that opened in October after nearly 1 1/2 years in planning and construction. Almost all Woodlands/Diamond Ridge regulars had long tired of the small structure that had been the makeshift clubhouse since the birth of Diamond Ridge in the late 1960s. With the inception of The Woodlands, in its seventh season, came added expectation. It was only a matter of time and money, said Tim Butler, assistant general manager for the Diamond Ridge and the Woodlands courses, who described the former clubhouse as small but functional for one course.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
Months before it opens, northern Baltimore County's newest golf course is attracting interested golfers -- and criticism."On weekends last summer, it was like a park," Superintendent Drew Scully, says, describing the cars full of people who dropped by to see how construction was coming along at Greystone in White Hall. The course is due to open by June.But eager as the county's 70,000-plus golfers are to try the course's carpetlike grass and gorgeous vistas -- and an 18-hole Diamond Ridge expansion under way in Woodlawn -- they fear that the greens fees will be too pricey.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
Golfers seeking to end the headache of jammed Baltimore County public golf courses got some relief yesterday, when the County Council endorsed a plan designed to free money for new courses.The plan would transfer three county-owned courses to the semipublic Baltimore County Revenue Authority, which could use its bond-selling capabilities to finance course construction.The arrangement "will make for much better public golf courses in the county," said Council Chairman Vincent J. Gardina, a 5th District Democrat.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
Greystone, a northern Baltimore County golf project that has been on and off for more years than people care to remember, will open officially for play Thursday.The public, daily-fee facility incorporates the rolling countryside, presenting both tree-lined and wide-open holes, along with five ponds. From the under-construction clubhouse site at the highest point of the property in White Hall, the vistas are dramatic.Joe Lee, the Florida-based architect who was part of the original team, developed a design that includes five sets of tees and plays from 4,800 to 6,925 yards, with a par of 72.Greystone is owned by the financially independent Baltimore County Revenue Authority, which bought the property about the same time it was negotiating for control of the county's other three public courses in 1995.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | September 24, 1990
Golfers in the public sector, not to be confused with the more affluent private country club set, continue to be woefully neglected. The area has an appalling lack of facilities. There are five courses in Baltimore City, three in Baltimore County, one in Anne Arundel County and none in Harford and Howard counties.It would seem that men and women running for office could be assisted and maybe even elected by the "golfers' vote" if they promised to build courses. The pleasing part of any such proposition is golf courses pay for themselves and return funds to government.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Loading his golf clubs onto a battery-powered cart, semiretired builder Bill Hugel shrugged off an impending $2 rate increase at one of his favorite courses. "I think it's reasonable," said Hugel, 73, as he prepared to play 18 holes at the Diamond Ridge Golf Course in Woodlawn. "This is one of the best courses around for the money." Waiting to tee off at Diamond Ridge, Tony Clarke felt differently. "I played here when it was $7," said Clarke, a 42-year-old maintenance worker from Woodlawn who will now have to pay $20 on weekends and $17 on weekdays to play 18 holes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1995
Baltimore County's 70,000-plus golfers could see two new public courses by 1997 -- the first built in two decades -- if a Ruppersberger administration plan is adopted.The additions would help attract and retain businesses and residents, county officials believe, and bring back thousands of local golfers who now drive to less crowded courses in southern Pennsylvania.The new courses would be in Woodlawn, where the county's Diamond Ridge course would be expanded by 18 holes, and in White Hall, where a partially finished private course would be bought and opened to the public.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
Loading his golf clubs onto a battery-powered cart, semiretired builder Bill Hugel shrugged off an impending $2 rate increase at one of his favorite courses. "I think it's reasonable," said Hugel, 73, as he prepared to play 18 holes at the Diamond Ridge Golf Course in Woodlawn. "This is one of the best courses around for the money." Waiting to tee off at Diamond Ridge, Tony Clarke felt differently. "I played here when it was $7," said Clarke, a 42-year-old maintenance worker from Woodlawn who will now have to pay $20 on weekends and $17 on weekdays to play 18 holes.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
Greystone, a northern Baltimore County golf project that has been on and off for more years than people care to remember, will open officially for play Thursday.The public, daily-fee facility incorporates the rolling countryside, presenting both tree-lined and wide-open holes, along with five ponds. From the under-construction clubhouse site at the highest point of the property in White Hall, the vistas are dramatic.Joe Lee, the Florida-based architect who was part of the original team, developed a design that includes five sets of tees and plays from 4,800 to 6,925 yards, with a par of 72.Greystone is owned by the financially independent Baltimore County Revenue Authority, which bought the property about the same time it was negotiating for control of the county's other three public courses in 1995.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
Months before it opens, northern Baltimore County's newest golf course is attracting interested golfers -- and criticism."On weekends last summer, it was like a park," Superintendent Drew Scully, says, describing the cars full of people who dropped by to see how construction was coming along at Greystone in White Hall. The course is due to open by June.But eager as the county's 70,000-plus golfers are to try the course's carpetlike grass and gorgeous vistas -- and an 18-hole Diamond Ridge expansion under way in Woodlawn -- they fear that the greens fees will be too pricey.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1995
Golfers seeking to end the headache of jammed Baltimore County public golf courses got some relief yesterday, when the County Council endorsed a plan designed to free money for new courses.The plan would transfer three county-owned courses to the semipublic Baltimore County Revenue Authority, which could use its bond-selling capabilities to finance course construction.The arrangement "will make for much better public golf courses in the county," said Council Chairman Vincent J. Gardina, a 5th District Democrat.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1995
Baltimore County's 70,000-plus golfers could see two new public courses by 1997 -- the first built in two decades -- if a Ruppersberger administration plan is adopted.The additions would help attract and retain businesses and residents, county officials believe, and bring back thousands of local golfers who now drive to less crowded courses in southern Pennsylvania.The new courses would be in Woodlawn, where the county's Diamond Ridge course would be expanded by 18 holes, and in White Hall, where a partially finished private course would be bought and opened to the public.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Under a banner celebrating the 25th anniversary of Diamond Ridge Golf Course, Baltimore County officials yesterday ushered in a new era for golf in the county.In a ceremony billed as "Golf Day in Baltimore County," the government officials announced plans for a new public course, recognized the head professionals of the three county courses and discussed national awards for two of the county's courses.Although there has been talk of another public facility for several years, Wayne Harman, director of recreation and parks, made Diamond Ridge II official, announcing that Lindsay Ervin of Crofton will be the architect for the 18-hole layout on county-owned land next to the current Woodlawn course.
NEWS
By Stefen Lovelace and Katherine Dunn and Stefen Lovelace and Katherine Dunn,Sun Reporters | October 3, 2007
Notebook The Patterson boys soccer team had won 16 straight Baltimore City league games, but City was not intimidated when it faced the Clippers last Wednesday. The Knights ended the Clippers' streak with a 2-1 win at Patterson. Nathal Ahmad and Dan Meade scored in the first half for the Knights. It was a big win for City and first-year coach George Sfikas. "I told them I was proud of them," Sfikas said after the win. "I told them as long as we get better every game, if you buy into what I tell you, things are going to get better."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1998
Baltimore County's fifth public golf course opens Wednesday, its second new public course in 13 months and a facility that officials say will help make the county a more attractive location for businesses and their executives.Woodlands Golf Course, a premium 18-hole course on county-owned land next to the older Diamond Ridge course near Woodlawn, cost $6.5 million and features a challenging 7,000-yard course with trees hemming in the fairways designed by Lindsay Ervin.Its opening -- to be preceded by a VIP outing on the course today -- culminates a three-year effort by the county to put its public golf courses in the hands of the financially independent Baltimore County Revenue Authority, rather than have the courses compete for tax dollars as part of the Department of Recreation and Parks.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | September 24, 1990
Golfers in the public sector, not to be confused with the more affluent private country club set, continue to be woefully neglected. The area has an appalling lack of facilities. There are five courses in Baltimore City, three in Baltimore County, one in Anne Arundel County and none in Harford and Howard counties.It would seem that men and women running for office could be assisted and maybe even elected by the "golfers' vote" if they promised to build courses. The pleasing part of any such proposition is golf courses pay for themselves and return funds to government.
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