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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
Linthicum-based Dialysis Corp. of America said Wednesday that it has agreed to be acquired for about $112 million by a fellow provider of outpatient dialysis care. The cash offer from U.S. Renal Care Inc., a privately held company in Texas, is for $11.25 per share. That's more than 70 percent above Dialysis Corp.'s $6.52-a-share closing price on Tuesday. The companies said they will provide services to 5,500 patients after the merger, which must be approved by Dialysis Corp.
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NEWS
July 23, 2013
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing a 10 percent cut to the Medicare payment for dialysis - a proposed reduction that is ill-advised, to say the least ("Medicare cuts hit dialysis hard," July 15). Dangerous would be a far better term. Dialysis providers faced with this eventuality will of necessity have to cut back. Each cutback will result in a reduction of quality care. I am living with kidney failure. Dialysis has been my life-saving therapy for more than 13 years.
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TRAVEL
By KATHLEEEN DOHENY and KATHLEEEN DOHENY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2006
If it's been a long time between vacations, you might feel as though you are chained to work and home responsibilities. For the 300,000 Americans who suffer kidney failure and need dialysis, that tethered feeling is a reality: Without blood-cleansing treatments, they can't survive. But that doesn't mean they can't take a vacation. In fact, it's encouraged, as long as a dialysis patient is in stable health and other health issues are under control, says Dr. Leslie Spry, a nephrologist in Lincoln, Neb., and a spokesman for the National Kidney Foundation, based in New York.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
On July 1, Medicare proposed a dramatic and disappointing reduction in dialysis payment rates that could jeopardize local dialysis care. As a dialysis professional I am responsible for some of the sickest and most vulnerable patients in Maryland, those with kidney failure who depend on dialysis three times each week to stay alive. Most people on dialysis, regardless of age, have Medicare. The new Medicare cuts worry me. The cost impact could result in reduced dialysis services and clinic closures at a time when kidney disease is rising in our state.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | January 22, 1994
Kevin C. Anderson, one of the longest-living dialysis patients in the United States, died Wednesday of internal bleeding at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The resident of Ten Hills in Baltimore was 52.He was stricken with kidney disease four days before his 26th birthday and underwent hemodialysis two to three times a week for more than 20 years, until he received a kidney transplant 2 1/2 years ago."He waited 11 years for a kidney," recalled the former Marta Lopategue of San Juan, Puerto Rico, whom Mr. Anderson married in 1964.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES | June 26, 2008
A 67-year-old Baltimore woman is suing a dialysis staffing company, alleging that she was sexually molested by an employee during a treatment in May 2007. The lawsuit, filed on behalf of Elizabeth Adams yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court, says that Malcon Jones of Baltimore caressed her breast during the visit, asking, "Does it feel good?" The suit against Independent Technicians Inc. and Jones is seeking $1 million. David Ellin, a lawyer for Adams, said his client filed suit with the hope that the news coverage would lead to Jones' arrest.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Dagmar M. Maszun, 39, who died after a heart attack Sunday at Francis Scott Key Medical Center, will be offered at 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 5502 York Road.Mrs. Maszun, who lived in Woodlawn, had suffered from kidney disease for many years. She had been active in recent weeks as an opponent of proposed budget reductions in the state's kidney dialysis program. The program was subsequently saved.Mrs. Maszun's husband, Joseph D. Morton Jr., said he did not think his wife's death was caused by her activities as a demonstrator and spokeswoman for dialysis patients.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
Reversing an earlier decision on one of the most controversial cuts to Maryland's deficit-threatened budget, Gov. William Donald Schaefer said today that he will restore about $6 million for continued payments for the state's kidney dialysis and pharmacy assistance programs.The governor's decision last month to cut state payments on dialysis treatment, a health service offered to nearly 4,200 Marylanders stricken with kidney disease, prompted emotional outcries across the state.At the time the cuts were announced, health officials said patients could find other ways to pay for treatment, particularly through private insurance or Medicaid, a health program for low-income earners.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 15, 1993
The logistics of how to have a benefit dance at North Carroll High School in honor of a teacher -- without harming the rubberized gym floor -- were solved with a 1950s approach.They're having a sock hop tonight: Students and teachers will check their shoes at the door along with their coats and hats, said physical education teacher Marsha Herbert, who is organizing the dance.The dance is the first in a long time at North Carroll High School, Ms. Herbert said. It will benefit Carroll Transit System's dialysis transportation service, which suffered from state budget cuts this year.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
No matter what Eric Washington is doing - be it catch-up work from the classes he has missed or a game of pick-up football that his doctors have forbidden - he must be home by 10 p.m. No exceptions. As he has every night for nearly three years, the Polytechnic Institute senior must hook himself up to a suitcase-sized contraption that will clean his blood as he sleeps. It's something Eric's kidneys used to do on their own, before they failed him when he was just 14. Now, as he waits for a kidney transplant, he relies on a dialysis machine beside his bed to keep him alive.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
Jan Chapin, a social worker who enjoyed the arts and sports, died March 14 from metastatic melanoma at her Cockeysville home. She was 65. The daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, the former Elizabeth Jan Iaderosa, who was known as Jan, was born in Bradford, Pa. She was raised in Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Virginia, Kansas, Maryland and Hawaii, where she graduated in 1965 from Bradford High School. Mrs. Chapin earned a bachelor's degree in 1969 from Villa Maria College, which is now Gannon University College, in Erie, Pa. In 1975, she earned a master's degree in clinical social work from the University of Maryland School of Social Work and Community Planning.
NEWS
By Kathe Lebeau | October 8, 2012
On Tuesday, I'm lucky to be speaking at Home Dialyzors United's third-annual meet up and conference in Baltimore. As an end stage renal disease patient currently doing home hemodialysis treatment, this is an issue I am passionate about. And, mostly because I'm an actual home dialysis patient, I'm able to attend the conference — since my dialysis travels with me — to speak firsthand about the benefits of home dialysis and help spread the word. It's an important conversation that I don't think happens nearly enough.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Dialysis is a lifesaving treatment for those with kidney disorders. But during emergencies, particularly bad weather, sometimes patients don't want to go — or can't get to — their usual dialysis center. There are some steps patients can take to prepare, says Brandon Eck at the DaVita dialysis centers, who volunteers with the company's emergency response team, DaVERT. What is dialysis and why it so important? Dialysis is a life-sustaining therapy for patients whose kidneys no longer function properly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 26, 2011
Josephine D. "Josie" Davis, a dialysis patient for 36 years who continued to work for the Social Security Administration during her treatment, died Aug. 19 from kidney disease at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She was 63 and lived in Pikesville. The daughter of a truck driver and a homemaker, Josephine Dorothy Owens was born one of 13 children in Baltimore and raised on China Street. After graduating from Edmondson High School in 1966, she attended Strayer's Business College and the Community College of Baltimore City on an academic scholarship.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
Dr. Jimmy Boyd Zachary, a retired Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center physician who was a pioneer in the study of kidney disease, died of cancer Feb. 15 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 83 and lived in Ruxton. Born and raised in Pontotoc County, Miss., Dr. Zachary earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Mississippi. He received his M.D. at Harvard Medical School and came to Baltimore as an intern and then chief resident at the old Baltimore City Hospitals, now Bayview.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
Linthicum-based Dialysis Corp. of America said Wednesday that it has agreed to be acquired for about $112 million by a fellow provider of outpatient dialysis care. The cash offer from U.S. Renal Care Inc., a privately held company in Texas, is for $11.25 per share. That's more than 70 percent above Dialysis Corp.'s $6.52-a-share closing price on Tuesday. The companies said they will provide services to 5,500 patients after the merger, which must be approved by Dialysis Corp.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
At 71, with more than two years of a punishing schedule of dialysis under his belt, William Kavadias thought a new kidney would never come. Transplants, he assumed, were for the young. But last year, Kavadias' life-saving chance came in an unlikely package - a kidney from an older donor became available. The transplant was successful, and today he's feeling great. It's the kind of surgery that many surgeons won't bother to perform. While kidneys from older donors are not suitable for younger patients, they can save seniors' lives, say some transplant surgeons.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers | October 26, 2000
Forced into a wheelchair by diabetes and kidney disease, Albert Hammond of South Baltimore signed up with Mobility in 1998 and experienced problems from the start. One night last year, exhausted from dialysis and disoriented after waiting 2 1/2 hours to be picked up, the 57-year-old fell out of his wheelchair, opened a leg sore and was hospitalized. On Christmas Eve, his ride home didn't show and a relative had to rescue him. "He hated dialysis to begin with, but he was so aggravated by the transportation," his sister, Josephine Brown of Southwest Baltimore, says.
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